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-   -   Which items would you DIY? Which would you hire out? (http://www.diychatroom.com/f2/items-would-you-diy-would-you-hire-out-155071/)

IdahoEv 08-28-2012 02:07 AM

Which items would you DIY? Which would you hire out?
 
So, I get the keys to my new house tomorrow. First one I've owned!

Here's the list of things (so far) I've considered doing or having done in the first year. I'm fully aware I can't do them all, but I want to do some of them - more for the fun and satisfaction of doing them than to save money. Though I don't mind saving money, either. The list is in rough order of priority - the things at the top are ones I consider more important to get done sooner.

If you had this list, which things would you do yourself, and which would you hire out? And why?
  • Fix bathrub drain leak
  • Fix jacuzzi tub PVC joint leak
  • Fix running Toilet
  • Drywall garage interior walls
  • install garage door opener
  • Install reverse osmosis filter in kitchen
  • Replace/repair damaged crawl space screens
  • Paint garage interior
  • Repair / replace mater shower door that doesn't close at the top
  • Replace ugly glass around guest bath showertub door with curtains
  • Elastomer coat the garage roof -- before el nino hits this winter!
  • Run ethernet - stopgap to offices to get the two non-wifi computers online.
  • Fix pipe/faucet vibration in hall bath faucet
  • Add ground wire to jacuzzi pump
  • Run non-softened water line to back of house (copper pipe, run through crawlspace, about 70')
  • Add shelves to master closet
  • Replace kitchen sink
  • Hang sliding closet doors in guest room
  • Paint the house & garage exterior
  • Sandblast/strip paint off the front stone facade. (Someone covered the pretty natural granite with white paint!)
  • Sprinklers / irrigation in front yard
  • Sprinklers / irrigation in back yard
  • Landscaping -- xeriscape front yard
  • Repair damaged joint in A/C ducts
  • Replace carpet with wood floor in the two offices
  • De-squeak hardwood floors
  • Run ethernet - done properly to most rooms with wall panels
  • Tile the kitchen floor
  • Epoxy coat garage floor

Thanks everyone!

chrisn 08-28-2012 04:15 AM

They make wi-fi adapters like this that you just plug in to the computer and it connects, no wires. As to the rest, I would probably tackle most except plumbing and carpentry and probably what ever you were doing on the roof

http://www.outletpc.com/gc5492.html?...FUfd4AodeGYADQ

md2lgyk 08-28-2012 06:12 AM

I would do (and mostly have done) all of them except the sandblasting.

Just Bill 08-28-2012 06:25 AM

As a remodeler for 27 years, I have done it all at one time or another. I used to do electrical on a friends license, but now I sub that out. Most localities allow the live in owner to do their own electrical, but it must still be inspected. Some plumbing I do, but leave drains to the experts. I don't do concrete, it is not a one man job!!!!!

There is very little I can't do or won't try. Wisdom often dictates otherwise.

bbo 08-28-2012 06:28 AM

i'd sell and get a new house :)

kidding .. kidding ... i would probably try to tackle them all, though I would consider a plumber for all the plumbing related ones. you might be able to get him to to them all in one trip.

ooh and I'd get someone to go on the roof.

user1007 08-28-2012 07:09 AM

Beyond whether you could or should do any or all of them is being honest about how much you have to budget in terms of time and money---and learning curve. There is nothing worse than oodles of started projects that never seem to get finished.

You also need to "triage" your list to see what has to happen quickly and what can wait. Then again, do the exercise in paragraph one. Are you going to be able to get to the membrane roof in time? Can you live without painting the garage?

PoleCat 08-28-2012 08:11 AM

You got enough there to keep a feller busy for quite some time. The leaks warrant immediate attention but the rest of that stuff you can address whenever you get around to it. When we got our dilapidated house almost twenty years ago I had ambitious plans too. But rather than go charging in I let the ideas mature over the course of several years and saved a lot of time and money not doing things that would have turned out being a waste.

bbo 08-28-2012 08:13 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by PoleCat (Post 998179)
But rather than go charging in I let the ideas mature over the course of several years and saved a lot of time and money not doing things that would have turned out being a waste.

I need to tell the wife that when she asks ... "Let's let that idea mature while we finish all the other crap."

of course, i'm the one who likes starting projects though.

PoleCat 08-28-2012 08:23 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by bbo (Post 998181)
I need to tell the wife that when she asks ... "Let's let that idea mature while we finish all the other crap."

of course, i'm the one who likes starting projects though.

I am blessed with a wife that has nearly infinite patience. Were it not for that I would have been swiftly painting walls that were to be torn down and putting a 6th layer of shingles on the roof and , and, well too much to mention here but I understand the delima of a demanding spouse. My cousins wife went off the deep end on one of his projects and went through the house with a hammer knocking holes in the walls everywhere.

chrisn 08-28-2012 05:00 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by PoleCat (Post 998199)
I am blessed with a wife that has nearly infinite patience. Were it not for that I would have been swiftly painting walls that were to be torn down and putting a 6th layer of shingles on the roof and , and, well too much to mention here but I understand the delima of a demanding spouse. My cousins wife went off the deep end on one of his projects and went through the house with a hammer knocking holes in the walls everywhere.

:eek:


nice:laughing:

hammerlane 08-28-2012 05:10 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by IdahoEv (Post 998084)
If you had this list, which things would you do yourself, and which would you hire out?

If I had that list of repairs/projects on a home I'm taking possession of tomorrow, I'd be hoping the purchase price of the home reflected that list.

rossfingal 08-28-2012 05:11 PM

Do the plumbing leaks first.
Kitchen sink? - think about a new faucet.
Post a separate thread in the "Electrical Sub-Forum" concerning a
ground-wire on the Jacuzzi.
"RF"

ratherbefishing 08-28-2012 05:39 PM

I would most likely attempt most of it myself, because I'm that way. But, I've learned a few things along the way. I don't really like painting and drywall. And, hanging drywall is easier with two people. If I have to ask for help, I might as well hire someone who's good at it. (I don't like drywall anyway) My wife seems to like painting.

I think plumbing is a good skill for a homeowner to have. Start with easy, non critical things. Like the toilet that runs. Next time you need a plumber, it may be late Sunday night. That's when your plumbing skills are really valuable. And I think plumbing is kinda fun, even if every project does take three trips to the store.

IMO, a roof is what makes a house a house, and not a fancy courtyard. So spreading roof sealer is your first project, and it's an easy one. Just wear old clothes. Find a local roofing supply house, instead of the big orange box.

There really isn't much on the list beyond the scope of DIY. It's not all gonna happen in one weekend. And a few of those items are hardly critical. But you'll be surprised what you can do once you pull on your overalls and decide to get dirty.

mgp roofing 08-29-2012 12:25 AM

I'd do all except the electrical & maybe the copper pipe. Knowing how to do basic plumbing is a godsend; while staying at a friend's house while doing a job in another city, one evening the toilet decided to leak all over the floor, just as I was about to head out the door to the nearby kendo club.. I was the only one in the house who knew what to do - I shut off the tap beside the cistern & dealt with the water everywhere; the next day I replaced the inlet valve. Problem fixed for $40.

IdahoEv 08-29-2012 10:53 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by hammerlane

If I had that list of repairs/projects on a home I'm taking possession of tomorrow, I'd be hoping the purchase price of the home reflected that list.

As it turns out, the price per square foot we paid is very low for this neighborhood. Most the houses around here are classic teens and 20's bungalows that have been heavily upgraded with very modern interiors, and ours is 1960's house with a 90's addition and only medium level upgrades.

That said, it actually needs very little - the electrical is in great shape; fully updated during the 90's addition with a 200 amp main and all new copper wiring. The main roof is only 5 years old. The garage roof is older and not as high quality, but still probably fine for another 5.

The only thing it really *needs* is to repair two slow plumbing leaks and fix one banging pipe. Everything else on my list is a voluntary upgrade. For example the garage would look nicer if it were drywalled, and I'd like to change the exterior color. The carpets are fine, I'd just prefer to put in wood in the room I'm using as an office, for example.


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