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zmindyk 11-01-2011 05:06 PM

Insulation between garage and bathroom above
 
We are remodeling the master bath which happens to be above the garage. Currently there is R-22 insulation between the two. I want to add some more to that, but am unsure of the easiest route to get it there. Should I pull up the subfloor, add batting and then new subfloor? OR should I make holes in garage ceiling and blow in some more insulation? Or make holes in subfloor to blow in more? How much more insulation can I add? The joists are engineered I beams that are 12 inches high and 16 inches apart.


thanks in advance
Mindy in Richardson, TX

Ron6519 11-01-2011 05:26 PM

I'd pull the ceiling down and spray a closed cell foam in there.

zmindyk 11-01-2011 05:29 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Ron6519 (Post 761709)
I'd pull the ceiling down and spray a closed cell foam in there.


I hear that can be fairly expensive, and I am not certain it will fit in the budget at this time. But maybe I am wrong on the cost.

Mindy

zmindyk 11-01-2011 06:21 PM

Anyone know what a double garage approximately costs to foam insulate in the Dallas TX area?

Mindy

Wildie 11-01-2011 08:30 PM

Assuming that the R22 insulation is in batt form and that there is a vapor barrier under the subfloor, I would suggest that you would blow cellulose insulation into the cavity that is between the insulation and the vapor barrier.
The cellulose can be blown into the cavities by drilling 1" holes through the subfloor.
After the joist cavities are filled, close the drilled holes using expanding foam insulation.

Msradell 11-01-2011 09:12 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Ron6519 (Post 761709)
I'd pull the ceiling down and spray a closed cell foam in there.

The only way to go! We used this solution a couple of years ago in exactly the same situation. The change in temperature of the bathroom is huge! You should at least check the price, it's probably not as bad as you're thinking.

zmindyk 11-01-2011 09:35 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Wildie (Post 761871)
Assuming that the R22 insulation is in batt form and that there is a vapor barrier under the subfloor, I would suggest that you would blow cellulose insulation into the cavity that is between the insulation and the vapor barrier.
The cellulose can be blown into the cavities by drilling 1" holes through the subfloor.
After the joist cavities are filled, close the drilled holes using expanding foam insulation.

Yes, the current insulation is in batt form with the attached vapor barrier to the underside of the upstairs floor. So blowing from the top would put insulation, vapor barrier, insulation.

Mindy

zmindyk 11-01-2011 09:36 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Msradell (Post 761921)
The only way to go! We used this solution a couple of years ago in exactly the same situation. The change in temperature of the bathroom is huge! You should at least check the price, it's probably not as bad as you're thinking.


Do you know how many inches of foam you used? Just curious.

Mindy

Wildie 11-01-2011 10:27 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by zmindyk (Post 761953)
Do you know how many inches of foam you used? Just curious.

Mindy

The foam is rated @ R5/inch!

Wildie 11-01-2011 10:29 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by zmindyk (Post 761952)
Yes, the current insulation is in batt form with the attached vapor barrier to the underside of the upstairs floor. So blowing from the top would put insulation, vapor barrier, insulation.

Mindy

The cellulose fills the void between the existing insulation and the vapor barrier that is immediately under the sub floor.

Msradell 11-02-2011 10:42 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by zmindyk (Post 761953)
Do you know how many inches of foam you used? Just curious.

Mindy

We put 6 inches of closed cell foam (about R-40). The big advantage is not only does it provide insulation but are also completely prevents air infiltration.

Gary in WA 11-03-2011 11:36 PM

You would still get a temperature difference from the cold garage air (thermal bridging), similar to a crawl space. You would also need a foam board under the new 5/8" fire-rated drywall. I would add more fasteners to the drywall, and possibly wood strapping, for the added weight of 12" of cellulose.
http://www.buildingscience.com/docum...n-crawlspaces/

http://gypsum.org/pdf/GA-216-2010.html

Gary


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