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Old 03-26-2009, 09:09 AM   #1
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Installing Window Jambs


Soon I intend to install replacement windows. I find that the existing jambs are not looking that good and would like to replace them also. Since replacement windows are installed using the current jamb and after the old windows are removed I'm concerned about being able to install new jambs and if there are any suggestions about a hardware piece that I just learned about called a jamb jack. This item claims to be able to eliminate having to shim between the rough opening and the new jamb. Has anyone used them ? The concept seems okay but do they really do the job and make the jamb fitting task any easier ? I would prefer not o go all out and install new construction windows and feel that replacing the jambs may not be that much fun but is workable.

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Old 03-26-2009, 12:15 PM   #2
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Installing Window Jambs


What do you mean by, "not looking too good". Usually if the jambs are bad the sill is in worse shape.
The jambs need to be connected top and bottom as well as to the sheathing.
Try to post a picture of the jamb issue.
Ron

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Old 03-26-2009, 12:55 PM   #3
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Installing Window Jambs


Hi Ron,

Thanks for the response. I think I should have worded that differently. The windows are stained wood. The thought is to use white vinyl windows and to also have white matching jambs. I consider the jambs to be in very good condition but should have referred to "not looking so good" as just a cosmetic condition with some scratches and dingies that have occurred over time. The jambs could be sanded, cleaned up and painted. I'm not sure that would be the best but is an option.

Your thoughts ?
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Old 03-26-2009, 03:02 PM   #4
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Installing Window Jambs


If the jambs and sill are in good physical condition leave them. Sand, putty and paint the insides. You could also do the outside the same way but, I would suggest you get someone to wrap them with vinyl coated coil stock. You will never have to paint the outside again.
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Old 03-26-2009, 04:30 PM   #5
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Originally Posted by rde476r View Post
Hi Ron,

Thanks for the response. I think I should have worded that differently. The windows are stained wood. The thought is to use white vinyl windows and to also have white matching jambs. I consider the jambs to be in very good condition but should have referred to "not looking so good" as just a cosmetic condition with some scratches and dingies that have occurred over time. The jambs could be sanded, cleaned up and painted. I'm not sure that would be the best but is an option.

Your thoughts ?
When you install a replacement vinyl window, you don't see the jamb. It's covered by the new window and the stop molding. The only thing you would possibly see is the 1/8" reveal that the trim molding that goes around the window exposes. That's easy to cover up without removing the whole jamb.
Ron
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Old 03-26-2009, 05:09 PM   #6
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To Ron6519 and HWConstruction.

Your input is very much appreciated. Living here in the Northeast with weather that just isn't right yet for me to get started gives me some time to take into account your thoughts and plan accordingly. I'm not a construction person but for many years have handled some easy and not so easy tasks. For the most part things come out fairly well in the end and I can claim the reward and the pleasure of doing it. There is always the time for the pros but I can't let them take away the fun when I think I can handle it myself. So far I've given myself an "A". Hope I can hold onto that when the window installation is completed.

Thanks...........Rich Scranton, PA
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Old 03-26-2009, 10:05 PM   #7
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Rick, this forum is littered with people who have measured incorrectly for replacement windows and have suffered the consequences for it. While the installatin of these can be done by monkeys with caulking guns, the measuring needs to be done by somone who knows what they're doing.
There are many sources on the internet as well as the company you're buying the windows from for guidance.
DIY doesn't mean you have to do it all by yourself.
Ron
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Old 03-27-2009, 08:56 AM   #8
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Originally Posted by Ron6519 View Post
Rick, this forum is littered with people who have measured incorrectly for replacement windows and have suffered the consequences for it. While the installatin of these can be done by monkeys with caulking guns, the measuring needs to be done by somone who knows what they're doing.
There are many sources on the internet as well as the company you're buying the windows from for guidance.
DIY doesn't mean you have to do it all by yourself.
Ron
I have to disagree on one point, as easy as windows are conceptually, small screwups can cause major problems especially with vinyl windows. It is imperative that the windows are installed square, shimmed properly, insulated properly, and then flashed and caulked properly. Failure to do any of those things will result in air and/or water infiltration. If its only air, you've just wasted money on windows because they are leaking anyway, however if its water, you are risking damage to the structure of your home as well as mold issues. I'm not trying to scare anyone, it can be a DIY job, however there are too many people running around thinking that a window install is just 4 screws and caulk.
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Old 03-27-2009, 11:04 AM   #9
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To Home Sealed,



I agree with you on all of your comments. It may not be an extremely difficult job but it's that small stuff that can mess you up.

Wondering......from my first post.....have you ever used jamb jacks when installing a jamb as opposed to shims ? The idea seems okay but I've heard no pros or cons on them.

Measurements I agree must be precise. Over the years I've always wondered why, when I cut a piece of wood I never made a mistake and cut it too long. It was always the other way.
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Old 03-27-2009, 05:36 PM   #10
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Installing Window Jambs


Okay, I might have over simplified the installation a bit, but screwing up the measuring process guarantees a Craig's List posting in your future.
Ron

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