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Old 12-16-2010, 02:33 PM   #16
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Indoor humidity


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Originally Posted by 47_47 View Post
I'm with Ron, unplug or turn off the water supply to your humidifier.
I suggested unplugging the unit from the electric. If the unit runs without water it might damage the motor.
Ron

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Old 12-16-2010, 03:13 PM   #17
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Indoor humidity


Thanks for suggesting I clean the dryer duct. I haven't done that since last winter and I'm sure it needs it again.

The humidity in the basement is 57% and upstairs right now is 61%. I guess it's called a 'garden level' basement. The bottom of the windows are a little bit above ground level.

I found something that looks like it would turn the water off to the humidifier, but it doesn't stop turning. It's where the water pipe and a thin copper tubing meet and the copper tubing goes over to the furnace.

This is a picture of the stationary side of the slider door. It has no condensation.

Indoor humidity-humidity-4.jpg

I wonder why there isn't condensation on both sides?

Is it possible that the seal on the sliding side is not keeping the cold air out like it should and is causing condensation to form when it meets the warm air at the top of the door frame.

The seal looks like it's still in good shape though.

Last edited by gma2rjc; 12-16-2010 at 03:21 PM.
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Old 12-16-2010, 03:20 PM   #18
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Indoor humidity


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Originally Posted by Ron6519 View Post
I suggested unplugging the unit from the electric. If the unit runs without water it might damage the motor.
Ron
Thanks Ron. I wouldn't have thought of that. I ran down there to unplug it and there isn't a plug coming out of it anywhere. There is only one outlet on that side of the utility room and the only thing plugged into it is for the little box that sits on the floor next to the furnace that pumps water to the sump pump, maybe when the central air is running.

Is it possible that the humidifier doesn't have to be plugged in?

Barb
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Old 12-16-2010, 03:29 PM   #19
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Indoor humidity


It sounds like the valve that you have is very likely a saddle valve, and if so, it's not surprising that it just turns, and does nothing. See if you have another valve, upstreeam, that you can shut off. If not, you will want to address that as a separate issue, but in the mean time, as the guys suggested, unplug the unit. As for the air flow, warm air actually moves toward cold air, and warm air has the ability to hold more moisture than cold air, so it is when the warm air hits the cold surface that the condensation occurs. Not that we're going to have a science test, but it may help you to better understand what is happening. As for the difference in condensation between the fixed and sliding unit, it makes perfectly good sense. As someone mentioned previously (but I can't scrll back up to see who without loosing my text), you are quite likely dealing with a relatively small area of cold air, right at the doors and windows, so although you may not be able to feel the difference, there is enough to allow the condensation to form on one and not the other.
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Old 12-16-2010, 03:40 PM   #20
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Indoor humidity


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Originally Posted by gma2rjc View Post
Is it possible that the humidifier doesn't have to be plugged in?

Barb
It might be wired directly. The unit needs to atomize the water, so it needs electricity. My mother in law has it plugged into an outlet on the side of the furnace.
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Old 12-16-2010, 03:41 PM   #21
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Indoor humidity


Do you have bath exhaust fans? Kitchen exhaust fans? Are they vented to the exterior? Where?
Have you taken readings on each floor?
Have you taken readings at the vents?

The bath exhaust vents out through the roof. Kitchen exhaust vents back into the kitchen, but is hardly ever used. I haven't baked, boiled or cooked anything today.

The humidity at the vents is 57%, the same as the basement.

I read the older post about the moisture on the ceiling and I think they are related. Is air from the soffit actually getting behind the vents that you added? Does your roof have venting at the peak, ridge vents or turbine vent? If not how does the air in the attic leave the attic?
Yes, air is going up through those baffles. The insulation you see was stuffed in there to cover the top plate and to keep the cellulose insulation from blowing down into the soffit.

I ended up cutting out the bottom 6" to 8" of all of the baffles - the part that comes down over the top plate. The rest of each baffle is still in place in the attic.

The reason for this is that there is only 2.5" of space in the soffit opening between the sheathing and the top of the top plate. When the baffles were in place, that only left about 1" of space for insulation over the top plate. Post #28 in the other thread has a picture of this.

Cocobolo suggested using the core plast to allow air to flow up into the attic, but also leave room to insulate over the top plate. That worked really well because not only is there air flowing up through the core plast, there is also a small gap between the sheathing and the core plast. There's a picture of this in post #28 of the other thread also.

All together, I believe there is about the same amount of air going up into the attic as the baffles were providing, because air is able to enter under all of the sheathing instead of just through the baffle. I hope I explained that right.

Thanks for posting the 2 pictures of how the attic should be vented. There are 5 square ridge vents up on the roof.

The moisture on the ceiling in that thread was due to the lack of insulation over the top plate and over the drywall just inside the soffit opening. Now that there is insulation over all of that, there hasn't been an issue with condensation on the ceiling. I've been checking a couple times a day, just to make sure.

Barb
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Old 12-16-2010, 03:42 PM   #22
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Indoor humidity


I would say your door seal is leaking. Is it colder near that door section than the other?

Can you measure the temp at that location and then compare it to the other side.
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Old 12-16-2010, 03:42 PM   #23
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Indoor humidity


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I'm trying to lower the humidity in my house and can't seem to keep it under 61%.

I have a humidifier attached to my furnace. The knob is turned to the off position and the damper is closed.

We run the bathroom fan when someone is using the shower.

I've opened the windows and can get it down to about 52%, but then the whole house is cooled off and the humidity eventually goes back up after I close the windows.

Here is what it looks like at the top of my slider door. Notice the black stuff near the drops.

Attachment 27692

The threshold and lower sides of the door frame look awful from staying wet all the time.

Side note: The stationary side of the door does not have this problem. There are no drops of water collecting at the top of it.

Any suggestions or ideas?

Thanks for looking at this.

Barb
This could be a bad weatherstripping piece. Cold air is getting in and condensing on the door.
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Old 12-16-2010, 03:48 PM   #24
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Indoor humidity


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Originally Posted by Ron6519 View Post
It might be wired directly. The unit needs to atomize the water, so it needs electricity. My mother in law has it plugged into an outlet on the side of the furnace.
Ron
I'll go down there and look above the furnace with a flashlight. The outlet the box on the floor is plugged into is on the side of the furnace.

The only other two outlets in that room have the washer and dryer plugged in and the sump pump and the water heater (which is gas, but there is something in it that requires electricity).

Barb
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Old 12-16-2010, 04:34 PM   #25
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Indoor humidity


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I suggested unplugging the unit from the electric. If the unit runs without water it might damage the motor.
I am not familiar with this particular model, but, based on others that I have seen, I was also concerned about the possibility that water flowing through the unit, even if unplugged or turned off, could cause a rise in humidity. Perhaps unplugging AND shutting off water supply may be a good idea.
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Old 12-16-2010, 05:15 PM   #26
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I don't know if these pics will tell you anything, but these are the only other wires I see.

Indoor humidity-humidity-5.jpg

Indoor humidity-humidity-7.jpg

Sorry about the tape. The wires were sticking out away from the furnace and I was catching my sleeve on them when I walked past.

The wires under the tape lead down to the little metal box next to the outlet.

Indoor humidity-humidity-6.jpg

Barb
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Old 12-16-2010, 05:50 PM   #27
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Indoor humidity


There should be wires coming out of the dehumidifier. Trace them to a source. It might be to the transformer next to the outlet.
Tell us what you find.
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Old 12-16-2010, 05:59 PM   #28
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Indoor humidity


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I don't know if these pics will tell you anything, but these are the only other wires I see.
That top picture is not of a wire, but of a water supply line. The little T-bar handle is the valve that would shut off the flow of water. If this small copper tube is the supply to your dehumidifier, I would shut this down (tighten, like a screw). Like Ron6519 said, however, it may be best to first wait until your unit is powered down.
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Old 12-16-2010, 07:24 PM   #29
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It looks like these are the only wires that come out of the humidifier. I looked all the way around it and on top. One wire goes from that bundle of wires taped to the furnace, down around and behind the pipes and hooks into the transformer next to the outlet box.

Indoor humidity-humidity-8.jpg

The wire that runs off to the right, where the arrow points, goes up and over the top and connects to another wire on top of the furnace that leads to the controller.

Indoor humidity-humidity-10.jpg

Indoor humidity-humidity-9.jpg

I opened the lid of the humidifier and didn't see any wires in there either. But I didn't pull the filter out to look for wires behind it.

Barb

Last edited by gma2rjc; 12-16-2010 at 07:29 PM.
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Old 12-16-2010, 08:08 PM   #30
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I assume that the brass device attached to the bottom of the blue-and beige housing is the valve through which water and power flows. Follow the wire from this and temporarily disconnect. The plastic tube coming from the bottom (attached to the black fitting) is likely the drain. Do you see any signs of water here?
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