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Old 06-13-2009, 01:32 PM   #1
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How would you repair this rotted door jamb. (pic inside)


Hi everyone,

Can I just amputate the bottom section of this exterior door jamb and match it and patch it? If so, what tools would work best? I have a 6" circular saw, sawzall, chisel, and flush cutter. These are the tools that I would opt for first, but I am no expert, but I am slightly handy.

I am worried that swapping out just damaged portion might compromise the structural integrity.

This is on a property I own, but rent out. It is in a condo association, so I need to do it quickly.

If I hired someone to fix it, what should i expect to pay?
I am in Edison, NJ
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Old 06-13-2009, 01:39 PM   #2
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How would you repair this rotted door jamb. (pic inside)


You might be able to use an epoxy material if you can stabilize the rotted out section above the hole.
Ron

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Old 06-13-2009, 02:05 PM   #3
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How would you repair this rotted door jamb. (pic inside)


That's pretty bad
I'd cut the whole thing out & pout new wood in
You'd need to call someone & have them give you an estimate
Costs differ widely by area
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Old 06-13-2009, 02:12 PM   #4
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How would you repair this rotted door jamb. (pic inside)


Thanks for the response Ron.

I should also mention that the metal threshold has some play, so the wood supporting that might be affected too.

To patch with epoxy wouldn't acheive the aesthetic standards required by the association.

What is the right way to do this job, without overkill?
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Old 06-13-2009, 02:16 PM   #5
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How would you repair this rotted door jamb. (pic inside)


Cut the area out
Install a new 2x in the cavity
Install new pieces of trim
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Old 06-13-2009, 02:17 PM   #6
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How would you repair this rotted door jamb. (pic inside)


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That's pretty bad
I'd cut the whole thing out & pout new wood in
You'd need to call someone & have them give you an estimate
Costs differ widely by area
Yeah, my question is, can i just cut out the bottom 6 - 10 inches, or do I need to replace the whole length of the door jamb.
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Old 06-13-2009, 02:21 PM   #7
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How would you repair this rotted door jamb. (pic inside)


I would just cut out the bottom & make sure the 2x is a tight fit
Does the door open & close without a problem?
Usually these are secured pretty well, so even if the bottom rots out the door is still secured in place
Support for the door mainly occurs at the hinges
Sounds like the threshold wood may need to be replaced (front piece)
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Old 06-13-2009, 02:23 PM   #8
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How would you repair this rotted door jamb. (pic inside)


To do it right, have the door removed and a whole new leg installed. That way you can also assess if the water has started to reach further in the building, flash the opening, attach the aluminum threshold to the new leg, put preservative on the new leg to prevent this from happening again, and keep it from looking like a beaver fixed your door.
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Old 06-13-2009, 03:02 PM   #9
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Thanks for the response Ron.

I should also mention that the metal threshold has some play, so the wood supporting that might be affected too.

To patch with epoxy wouldn't acheive the aesthetic standards required by the association.

What is the right way to do this job, without overkill?
If the repair was done correctly, the only person who knew it was done would be the individual who did it.
If it was my door, I'd remove it from the opening and replace the whole side.
The epoxy advice was meant for someone with minimal carpentry skills. If the overseerers don't like an epoxy repair, how do you think they'll like a butchered jamb repair?
Ron
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Old 06-13-2009, 05:41 PM   #10
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How would you repair this rotted door jamb. (pic inside)


you might check w/ the condo assoc first ... generally speaking, exterior wood is the responsibility of the HOA.
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Old 06-13-2009, 05:46 PM   #11
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How would you repair this rotted door jamb. (pic inside)


My wife lived in a Condo
Who pays for what can differ from one to the other
Her porch roof covered 2 entrances, so that was common property & repairs were paid for by the Assoc as a whole. However, in many cases major repairs everyone then has to pay an extra fee to cover what is above & beyond normal repairs

Her front door & trim were her responsibility
Good idea to check with the Condo Assoc to verify 1st
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Old 06-13-2009, 06:32 PM   #12
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How would you repair this rotted door jamb. (pic inside)


doing an expert ''invisible'' repair with epoxy is easier said than done,it takes considerable expertise to pull it off properly,much eaasier to dutch man or replace the leg

i think i saw new extierior door frames in the HD were the first foot or so is a composite

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Old 06-14-2009, 06:04 AM   #13
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How would you repair this rotted door jamb. (pic inside)


Checking with the Association may answer some questions and also may stir the nest. Your "Contract Documents" may require you to get a permit, and hire a licensed carpenter.

For someone with experience that type of repair isn't all that difficult. In lieu of replacing the entire leg (which can be a major repair, as that is the hinge side), there are other fixes. The door comes off, and the section is cut out. A new section can be made up to fit.

Or, the area can be cleaned out to good wood, and Bondo can be used to do the repair. If Bondo is used, a wood build up section can be added so there is very little Bondo needed to create the final shape. It's quick and easy to shape, dries fast.






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Old 06-14-2009, 09:34 AM   #14
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How would you repair this rotted door jamb. (pic inside)


I've actually done quite a few of these in my business. The real decision gets to be-do you want to pay to repair this or to replace the damage? It always seems to come out about the same dollar amount and time spent. These used to be somewhat of some trouble to cut out the bad wood and replace with good wood, making it look as if I had not been there. But, I will have to say since I bought one of those "Multi-Master" type saws this particular task is much easier. If you do the repair, do go back enough to determine the full extent of the damage, don't just mask over something that will be covered up-out of sight. The threshold area in particular needs attention as to the repairs lasting a long time. Using a PT wood or some type preservative on raw wood is good. The advice about checking with the Association is good, I've run into this and it seems to be always in the middle of the repair. I do it to suit some of them, and can't satisfy the others. Good Luck, David
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Old 06-14-2009, 09:45 AM   #15
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How would you repair this rotted door jamb. (pic inside)


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Or, the area can be cleaned out to good wood, and Bondo can be used to do the repair. If Bondo is used, a wood build up section can be added so there is very little Bondo needed to create the final shape. It's quick and easy to shape, dries fast.
While Bondo may work well in southern Florida, it is much too hard a product for most climates. It will not expand and contract the same as the wood it is bonded to and the repair will fail. There are 2 part epoxy wood fillers that are made for this type repair and will expand and contract as the same rate as the patched wood.

Personally I would remove the door and replace the hinge side jamb. This will allow you to re-secure the threshold properly to the side jambs. I would replace all the brick mold with a composite if your Association allows it.

An earlier poster mentioned a door where the lower 6-8 inches are composite. I have used these doors and it is a great product to use when the door is not well protected from the weather (especially if the door is subject to rain bouncing up against the bottom of the jambs and door). I wish I could buy replacement jamb stock made up this way.

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