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Old 04-09-2013, 03:17 PM   #16
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How can this big house be so small (Floorplans)


My vote goes for attic conversion over bump-out. That said, attic conversion isn't trivial. You have to get the insulation and ventilation right, which usually means spray-foam insulation, possibly after furring out the rafters to get enough depth. Also, there are code requirements re: ceiling height in attics, something like at least X% of the ceiling area has to be Yft high, so you might want to research those first to see if you even have the necessary height.

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Old 04-09-2013, 04:05 PM   #17
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How can this big house be so small (Floorplans)


Yeah the more I think about it from cost and practicality this seems to be the best option.
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Old 04-09-2013, 05:30 PM   #18
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How can this big house be so small (Floorplans)


Never like it when there's that many steps from the fridge to a working counter. Think about it, when cooking you'd he schlepping all the way over to the fridge and have nowhere to set anything down. So you've got to traipse back over to a counter. Talk with a local kitchen designer.

Second, never liked powder rooms right off an eating area. Noise being the issue, and then, well, smells. Where's the vent for it going to go? Right out onto the deck? Smells again. Went through this with a powder room in our new place, ended up running the vent up to the roof.

Remember, doors and windows can be moved. Don't commit yourself to a given layout just because of where the windows are currently located. Especially not when it's just a clapboard exterior. Brick would complicate things, but only because of matching the style.

I'd lean toward losing the kitchen door entirely, allowing the fridge to go in place of the door. Then reorient the door to the powder room so it faced the basement stairs. Making the opening between the study and kitchen wider in the process. That'll give it a more open feel.

But the study's plan currently leaves a lot of dead space. What're you expecting to use that room for?

2nd floor bath, you have the tub's wet wall facing the wrong way. If there's enough length I'd lean more toward putting it left/right just behind the door. That'd make the use of the right-hand sink better too.

There's also the fundamental question of flow. Just which door will you be using more regularly? Front or back? You want to be thinking about how you'll be walking through the house on a daily basis. That might lead to really re-thinking the whole first floor. Don't let yourself get stuck with the current windows/doors and room placements. If you're always coming in from the back/side then maybe swapping things around would give better flow. Put the dining room back where the study is. Move the living room to the dining room, opening it up as a kitchen/family room space. Then put the study in the front corner where the living room was. This would leave a better outside-kitchen-family room-stairs flow. Instead of having to plod through the dining room all the time.
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Old 04-09-2013, 06:19 PM   #19
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How can this big house be so small (Floorplans)


The steps from the fridge to the center counter/working area is 3 steps tops.

I am not crazy about the powder room placement either, however if I were to make the 2 baths to 1 big bath on the 2nd level, not having at least a power room is pretty nutty. There is no other good design that works for it.

Windows in general will not be moved. This is a Colonial Revival with uncanny symmetry. If I start to move windows around it would change the character of the house entirely. As it is I am trying to reclaim one missing element, the typical center window on the 2nd floor / front facing.

As for the kitchen door. This is our primary door into the house. Our front door is used primarily for guests. Our driveway runs adjacent to the DR and Kitchen. Makes no sense to make the primary door the Study and then have to walk into the Kitchen. I see your thoughts on the fridge orientation, just not sure if it would work well in this case. I'll have to envision more not having door access to the kitchen and see if it's even plausible.

I didn't do a lot of placement of things in the design so it wouldn't be cluttered. The study would be a combo-use room. Book storage, two desks, center area for the kids to play in (have a 5 and 6 yr old).

I might be able to turn the tub. Have to try that. Worse solution is I don't put the door dead center.

I could swap the living spaces, right now the flow is OK, but to me it would make more sense to have the Kitchen most open to the DR, not the LR. I originally thought of swapping the DR with the study only, but I think structurally it would be impossible to work. The center area is supporting two bath areas, and it would take a lot (and look odd) to keep that support there. Plus the waste/water lines run up that wall.

I could turn the right side to DR/Kitchen but swapping the rooms to give me more kitchen space. Not sure. I know having the kitchen where the study is would lose room because of the French Doors.
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Old 04-09-2013, 08:16 PM   #20
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How can this big house be so small (Floorplans)


Symmetry? For what purpose? "Because"? Bad excuse. Sure, the front facade works with it, but the rear? Why deprive yourselves of useful alternatives?

Actually you probably DON'T want the kitchen open to the dining room. Not unless you're not going to treat it as a dining room, but more of a breakfast table.

Again, don't get hung up on where doors or windows are today. I'm not saying they have to move, just that coming up with a really workable floorplan often benefits quite a lot from putting all the cards on the table.

It really does help to step back and think about daily traffic patterns. If things were in different places, how would the patterns work better...
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Old 04-09-2013, 09:53 PM   #21
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How can this big house be so small (Floorplans)


Disregarding the budget issues, combining both of your ideas would certainly make the best house in the long run. That would give you 3 1/2 bathrooms with 5 bedrooms. You could use the area you planned for a powder room in the attic proposal is a very nice walk-in pantry! That would also make the home much more attractive in the long run.
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Old 04-09-2013, 09:56 PM   #22
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How can this big house be so small (Floorplans)


Oh no doubt, but to do both I would need some lottery proceeds to help the cause.
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Old 04-09-2013, 10:14 PM   #23
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So taking a few ideas that wkearney99 suggested, one general room location, I decided to flip the Study and the Dining Room, and do some modification. Lost the kitchen door which allowed for a pantry and a slightly larger bath (but lost the double oven).

I am liking the layout a little bit more than my first Master Suite layout.

References:

Bumpout
Master Suite #1
Master Suite #2 (room reorg)
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Old 04-10-2013, 10:00 PM   #24
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That new plan is definitely much better than both of the originals. It not only makes the house much more usable, but also provides a much elevated resale potential when that time comes.
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Old 04-10-2013, 11:06 PM   #25
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Msradell View Post
That new plan is definitely much better than both of the originals. It not only makes the house much more usable, but also provides a much elevated resale potential when that time comes.
much better than both of the originals indeed !

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