Go Back   DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum > DIY Repair > General DIY Discussions

CLICK HERE AND JOIN OUR COMMUNITY TODAY...IT'S FREE!

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 12-26-2010, 01:17 PM   #1
Newbie
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Posts: 3
Share |
Default

hot water heater


I have an 80 gallon hot water heater that is about 18 years old. I think the tank must be filled up about half way with sediment, as I tried to fill a jacuzzi with water and it ran out of hot water after filling only 20%. I tried to drain the tank, but nothing would come out of the spigot on the bottom. I have been trying to decide whether to take the easy way out and just replace the electric hot water heater or install a new tankless heater. Has anyone had any experience with the tankless units? Is there much trouble to install one after having an electric tank model? Thanks for any information

mikey135 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-26-2010, 01:37 PM   #2
Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Location: Albany, GA
Posts: 295
Default

hot water heater


Quote:
Originally Posted by mikey135 View Post
I have an 80 gallon hot water heater that is about 18 years old. I think the tank must be filled up about half way with sediment, as I tried to fill a jacuzzi with water and it ran out of hot water after filling only 20%. I tried to drain the tank, but nothing would come out of the spigot on the bottom. I have been trying to decide whether to take the easy way out and just replace the electric hot water heater or install a new tankless heater. Has anyone had any experience with the tankless units? Is there much trouble to install one after having an electric tank model? Thanks for any information
The thing about tankless water heaters is the ability to raise temperature instantaneously, where a conventional tank can take the necessary time to heat a reservoir. This is an oversimplification, but basically it means that the faster you draw water from a tankless system, the less heated the water will be.

The decision to switch from a tanked to tankless system will be based on many factors (fuel type, typical groundwater temperature, typical water usage in your home, etc.). Without knowing those factors, it's hard to say whether a tankless system will be right for you, but in general, a whole-house tankless system provides the best results when it is powered by natural gas/propane in environments where the groundwater temperate is moderate and water usage is not extraordinary heavily. Some of these factors can be offset by using multiple tankless generators in a single house.

clashley is offline   Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to clashley For This Useful Post:
mikey135 (12-26-2010)
Old 12-26-2010, 03:12 PM   #3
Newbie
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Posts: 3
Default

hot water heater


I live near Myrtle Beach In S.C., and although we do not have access to natural gas, propane is an option. I can just hear my wife scream "NO" now! My wife and I are the only ones living at home now, and our water usages are moderate. Only a shower everyday and a load of clothes every other day is all that our water usage consists of. I'm not quite sure about the power requirements of a large tankless unit would be, as the present tank unit has a 30 amp breaker run with #10 wire.
mikey135 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-26-2010, 03:58 PM   #4
Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Location: Albany, GA
Posts: 295
Default

hot water heater


Quote:
Originally Posted by mikey135 View Post
I live near Myrtle Beach In S.C., and although we do not have access to natural gas, propane is an option. I can just hear my wife scream "NO" now! My wife and I are the only ones living at home now, and our water usages are moderate. Only a shower everyday and a load of clothes every other day is all that our water usage consists of. I'm not quite sure about the power requirements of a large tankless unit would be, as the present tank unit has a 30 amp breaker run with #10 wire.
Two considerations are the temperature of your groundwater and your desired flowrate. If you have municipal water service, your groundwater temp will probably be reasonably equal to the average ambient temperature in your area (probably around 65 degrees or so for SC), but if you have a well, it could be a lot lower. If you want to heat 65 degree water to 110 degrees, you need something that can rise the temperature by about 45 degrees.

Next up is flowrate (how much water do you need?). If you are going to stick with an electric heater, the highest flow rate with a 45 degree temo rise you'll get from a tankless system is probably around 4.0 gallons/minute. If you need more flow and/or higher temp rise, you'll probably need to look at a fossil-fueled system.

An electric system like I described is going to cost around $700 or so (not counting installation), plus it will draw about 120A, so you'll need to have some electric work done, also.

Quite frankly, in your position, unless you are specific about going with a tankless system, I'd probably replace the WH with another tank (possibly a smaller one).
clashley is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-26-2010, 04:16 PM   #5
Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: Long Island, NY
Posts: 9,519
Default

hot water heater


It would be odd that the tank would be half filled with sediment.
Has the anode ever been replaced? This is an old heater, I don't know how cost effective the repair would be.
The spigot could be clogged with some sediment. When was the last time you drained the sediment from the tank?
You might try snaking in a wire to break the clog.
Ron
Ron6519 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-26-2010, 08:49 PM   #6
Electrical Contractor
 
jbfan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Location: Newnan GA
Posts: 5,697
Default

hot water heater


One thing to consider is the size of your electric service.
Don't buy an electric instant water heater without making sure the service is large enough to handle it.
I would just replace with the same type you have now.
__________________
Yes I am a Pirate, 200 years too late. "Jimmy Buffett"
jbfan is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 12-27-2010, 09:38 AM   #7
Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Posts: 1,724
Default

hot water heater


I can't add anything to what has already been said regarding the pro's and con's of tankless versus what you have now, but in regard to your existing unit, I agree with Ron in regard to trying a wire in the drain valve, in order to dislodge the crud. Also, and I apologize if I missed it in a previous post, while you are at it, you may want to check the heating elements, to see if one of them is bad. With the power OFF, you can remove the side covers, and check them with an ohm meter. Then all you have to decide if it's worth repairing, but as for being 18 years old, I replaced our 30 year old electric how water heater a couple of years ago, just because, and we have relatively hard well water.

DexterII is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
How to properly drain and flush a hot water heater? speedster1 Plumbing 9 04-17-2012 09:55 PM
no water at sink after water heater removal rebelbull Plumbing 2 07-19-2011 12:37 AM
A blocked water line causing water to loose heat? Snav Plumbing 6 05-07-2010 02:18 PM
water heater drip kdange1 Plumbing 5 05-04-2010 03:24 PM
Water heater pressure relief valve confusion Flt_Simulation Plumbing 4 07-11-2009 10:02 AM




Top of Page | View New Posts

Copyright © 2003-2014 Escalate Media. All Rights Reserved.