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handy man88 09-05-2007 07:02 AM

Home Inspection
 
I have a relatively new house (4 years). What would you do to prepare the house to make sure there are no issues when the buyer's inspector rolls by to do his inspection?

Main areas that the inspector should be focusing on are structural, electrical, plumbing, and appliances (ie. HVAC).

dcd22 09-05-2007 07:59 AM

Have it inspected first. The cost will be about $300 and you can know before the time comes if there is anything to address.

I guess you would call it a pre-sale inspection.

Clutchcargo 09-05-2007 08:04 AM

Keep in mind that anything that your inspector finds will be subject to disclosure.

KUIPORNG 09-05-2007 08:18 AM

find any water marks in all ceilings including the garage.... if there is... paint them... especially those under the bathroom... those most of the times is not caused by leak but rather than regular wet floor overflow...etc....

Big Bob 09-05-2007 09:43 AM

4 years old? Don't worry unless you have issues you suspect like water & mold in the walls.

Your sales contract will have X $ amount you might have to fix.

The HI will find stuff no matter how much prep you do. It's their job.:laughing:

Minor (thought it was just dirty) frosted insulated windows seems to be one of the items HI's have keyed on lately. Ghee! if you wash the window then dry it well with a hair dryer the frosting goes away for a while.

handy man88 09-05-2007 10:49 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Big Bob (Post 61417)
4 years old? Don't worry unless you have issues you suspect like water & mold in the walls.

Your sales contract will have X $ amount you might have to fix.

The HI will find stuff no matter how much prep you do. It's their job.:laughing:

Minor (thought it was just dirty) frosted insulated windows seems to be one of the items HI's have keyed on lately. Ghee! if you wash the window then dry it well with a hair dryer the frosting goes away for a while.


Is this "frost" scum that can usually be scraped with a razor? Why would this be an issue, as long as there's no condensation between the glass.

chitown55 09-05-2007 11:38 AM

As someone mentioned, that inspector is paid to find problems, so problems will be found.

I would just go through with your best critical eye and fix whatever you can within reason.

A few notes, and items that almost always get picked on that I can related after going through a few home inspections in the past few months:


-Check the pitch of the ground along your house, and make sure that it is angled away from your foundation. If not, and it's easy to re-grade by adding dirt and correct it, do so.
-Cut any vegetation away from contact with your house.
-Make sure you have GFI outlets within 6 feet of sinks, in any outdoor outlets, and in the garage
-If you haven't done so recently, get your furnace serviced and cleaned. Make sure the filters are clean and that the pad in your humidifier has been replaced recently.
-Make sure your toilets are bolted down tightly. This is a minor issue, but I've seen inspectors scare people into thinking that it might be a broken flange.
-Have receipts ready for any obvious repair work that has been done professionally, especially foundation cracks

Big Bob 09-05-2007 12:08 PM

"Frosting" is that condition the insulated window appears to have prior to a noticeable condensation problem. Easy temp fix is heat up air inside glass ( hot air expands finds tiny hole or break in seal taking higher Rh inside the window out with it). Try to do this on a cool dry low Rh day for better results.

Frosting means the seal has been broken and ambient air with water vapor has entered. Replacement might be called for on the inspectors report.

MJW 09-05-2007 02:37 PM

My bro-in-law does home inspections for private buyers and some realtors.

Just an FYI, the stuff the guy finds doesn't necessarily mean you HAVE to fix it. It is just brought to the attention of the buyer. Some things may have to be fixed to legally sell, but you can sell a house as-is also.

handy man88 09-05-2007 07:54 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by MJW (Post 61455)
My bro-in-law does home inspections for private buyers and some realtors.

Just an FYI, the stuff the guy finds doesn't necessarily mean you HAVE to fix it. It is just brought to the attention of the buyer. Some things may have to be fixed to legally sell, but you can sell a house as-is also.

Great point. Thanks.

troubleseeker 09-05-2007 08:06 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by dcd22 (Post 61393)
Have it inspected first. The cost will be about $300 and you can know before the time comes if there is anything to address.

I guess you would call it a pre-sale inspection.

I think that would just be a waste of money, since every inspector has his own agenda. I have seen them not even mention what should have been serious structural or mechanical concerns, and submit a 20 page report full of trivial crap; holes in the insect screen on windows , peeling paint on the metal roof jacks, automatic closer on a screen door that they felt did not close properly, burned out light bulbs, etc.(all real items from reports, and I could list another 50 such "problems"). These seem to come from the little independent guys who jumped on the inspection bandwagon for the prospect of easy money, and they don't want to find too many serious problems because if the get the reputation of being a "deal breaker" among the real estate agents, they will not get any referrals from them.

On the other end of the spectrum are the guys that are engineers, who expanded their business into this for diversication. They are gauranteed to find a couple of "major structural" problems that need to be addressed.
An acquaintence recently had his house for sale (1.5 million $ property, about 7 yrs old and well maintained) , and the inspector (engineer) totally trashed it structurally, even describing one wing of the house (contiguous slab on grade foundation) as being so structurally unsound an addition that it was in danger of cracking off of the house. When the owner showed him the original house plans with this as part of the original contruction, it made no difference to him. Coupled with two other "major structural" problems that were in the report, of course the deal fell through, and there is now legal action involving the inspector.

timmy 09-06-2007 10:30 AM

Many buyers use the house inspection as a way to lower the sale price after the fact. If you do have an inspection that you think is unfair you can always have an inspector come in afterwards to make sure the buyers are trying to exaggerate their claims. It may be silly but a clean house with new paint does seem to attract a less critical eye. But dont forget as mentioned earlier that housing inspectors always find things because it is their job.


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