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-   -   Home Depot Classes; are they any good? (http://www.diychatroom.com/f2/home-depot-classes-they-any-good-41786/)

RyanD 04-04-2009 12:55 PM

Home Depot Classes; are they any good?
 
Just browsing around the store and they grabbed my attention. They have some tomorrow for fixing drywall and there are some ones of electrical and tiling coming up. Has anyone gone to these, are they any good?

Bob Mariani 04-04-2009 01:19 PM

Any class will offer some knowledge which is always good. If not sure of something they say it would be good to learn more about it here.

gma2rjc 04-04-2009 01:35 PM

It probably depends on the level of knowledge of the employee teaching the class. And, they are only given a set amount of time, so who knows if they're able to give you very thorough instructions.

As far as the electrical class goes, I would love to learn how to fix electrical problems around my house. But....taking a 30-60 minute class at Home Depot would, IMO, give me just enough knowledge and confidence to get myself killed. That's just my .02 cents worth.

Scuba_Dave 04-04-2009 03:55 PM

I went to one for tiling
They guy knew what he was talking about
It was very helpful

bjbatlanta 04-04-2009 06:10 PM

It can't hurt, and I'm sure you can learn some basics. Just don't take their instruction for "gospel". When in doubt, come back to this site....

slickshift 04-04-2009 06:26 PM

Definitely check them out
Most presenters are at least well prepped if not actually experienced (but some are experienced), and the actual visuals of seeing it live and responses to real-time questions, and sometimes hands-on time...the actual interaction...can be very, very, helpful compared to a video or book

Worth the cost (usually just some time) if not more, given the caveats presented in this and the previous responses
Possibly worth much more if you get a good presenter and you respond more to this type of thing than a video or book instructions

Scuba_Dave 04-04-2009 09:50 PM

One thing the tiling did not touch on was waterproofing for a shower/tub area. But that would be a little more advanced I guess

Bob Mariani 04-05-2009 07:47 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by gma2rjc (Post 254951)
It probably depends on the level of knowledge of the employee teaching the class. And, they are only given a set amount of time, so who knows if they're able to give you very thorough instructions.

As far as the electrical class goes, I would love to learn how to fix electrical problems around my house. But....taking a 30-60 minute class at Home Depot would, IMO, give me just enough knowledge and confidence to get myself killed. That's just my .02 cents worth.

You are right on with this electrical troubleshooting comment. But it is more the fact that this subject demands a lot of experience in different was electrical and the building are constructed to visualize where the electrical problem can be resolved. No class can cover this in a short time. But sites likes this can help, since we narrow down the problem to one issue at a time.

Bob Mariani 04-05-2009 07:48 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Scuba_Dave (Post 255103)
One thing the tiling did not touch on was waterproofing for a shower/tub area. But that would be a little more advanced I guess

This is what my post was about. It is a good start and then post here for more details and verification on any issues you are not sure off. Also HD will only cover the basic installation and not offer any higher end installation methods or materials.

sunjwd 04-16-2009 10:31 AM

I can see that the answer is "it depends on the instructor".
From personal experience another factor is the format of the class.

I went to part of a drywall class (I was in the store and saw the
class so I stood and listened-watched).
The instructor had a set up there to demonstrate what he was
talking about. It was awesome and really instructive. For DIY,
there is nothing like seeing it done at least once.

I signed up for a deck class to prep for building my deck.
That one was crappy. There was no demo - it was purely lecture
by 2 kids filling in for the instructor who was sick. Some kids really
know their stuff, but these were just starting out.
Nice guys but not experienced. During the talk they showed things
from a shopping cart. It was memorable to me when they pulled
out one of those shadowtrack-like things and didn't know what
it was for or how to use it.

Since I am a DIY newbie, I will take advantage of more Home Depot
seminars in the future (and Lowes when they start having them in Canada). However, I will ask ahead of time if there is a demo or not.
I'll probably avoid the non-demo seminars - you get more watching
HGTV.

gma2rjc 04-16-2009 11:34 AM

Luckily, if you have done some diy at home and also spent some time on this forum, you probably have an idea of how something should be done. At least maybe enough to know when something they're teaching doesn't seem right.

You're right, it does depend on the instructor.

Imagine being those poor kids and your boss tells you that you're giving a demonstration on something you really don't know much about. Yikes!

Caromsoft 04-22-2009 02:06 PM

I went to the one on patching drywall last Sunday. I was the only one who came for the class so I had one on one instruction. The instructor did the demo based on what I told him I needed, and then I was able to ask a lot of questions. Was very helpful for me! :)

Bob Mariani 04-22-2009 03:07 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by sunjwd (Post 260739)
I can see that the answer is "it depends on the instructor".
From personal experience another factor is the format of the class.

I went to part of a drywall class (I was in the store and saw the
class so I stood and listened-watched).
The instructor had a set up there to demonstrate what he was
talking about. It was awesome and really instructive. For DIY,
there is nothing like seeing it done at least once.

I signed up for a deck class to prep for building my deck.
That one was crappy. There was no demo - it was purely lecture
by 2 kids filling in for the instructor who was sick. Some kids really
know their stuff, but these were just starting out.
Nice guys but not experienced. During the talk they showed things
from a shopping cart. It was memorable to me when they pulled
out one of those shadowtrack-like things and didn't know what
it was for or how to use it.

Since I am a DIY newbie, I will take advantage of more Home Depot
seminars in the future (and Lowes when they start having them in Canada). However, I will ask ahead of time if there is a demo or not.
I'll probably avoid the non-demo seminars - you get more watching
HGTV.

Be careful trying to only learn by DIY and HGTV shows. These are for entertainment and rarely if ever are jobs done correctly.

Jack of most 04-27-2009 10:53 AM

I wouldn't recommend HD to anyone. Go to LOWES!

gma2rjc 04-27-2009 10:57 AM

Quote:

I wouldn't recommend HD to anyone. Go to LOWES!
Any special reason? Just wondering.


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