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cips 04-05-2009 05:55 PM

Help: Installing Faux stone over interior concrete surface
 
Hello.

Just purchased about 30 plus sq ft of individual faux stones that I want to put over a masonary wall (cinder block concrete block) in my basement that we are refinishing. The area is about 51 inches wide by 82 inches tall and like I mentioned, the surface is just small concrete block area that we want to spice up. The faux stone is the no grout variety that you stack on top of each...so there is no grouting involved.

My questions are:

Can I just mortar the light faux stone right to the block working my way from the bottom up ( or is top to bottom better?)? or is it recommended to tack up a metal lath and do a scratch coat. Reason I am asking is that I have heard conflicting responses in just mortoring them up right to the wall versus prepping a wall with metal lath and scratch coat??

Thanks

Bob Mariani 04-05-2009 07:28 PM

metal lathe and scratch coats are used for heavier stones. These can most likely be "glued" with mortar working from the bottom up. Run a few rows at a time and let dry. do not attempt placing too many on top of each other at one time.

jomama45 04-05-2009 07:55 PM

As long as the block wall isn't painted, the stone will stick great. I would recommend starting at the top & working your way down so mortar droppings don't smear your work below. I would also consider a colored mortar somewhat close to your stone, as grouting can get messy for newbs, & mortar smears won't be as obvious. Good Luck. :thumbup:

Tscarborough 04-05-2009 07:58 PM

Use thinset to set them, and unlike most faux stone, this particular one should be laid from the bootm up.

cips 04-06-2009 05:47 PM

Thanks for the input guys. This will be the weekend project. I will probaly start from the bottom up as well as that is what I have been hearing more consistently, though to be honest , it makes sense to me to go top to bottom due to mortar drippings..any reasoning why one is preferred over the other for this particular faux stone?

Also, any tips on laying the faux stone when it comes to the edges since I am sure I will need to make cuts etc to get it all to fit nicely. I want to avoid too many little cut stones to fill in the edges..know what I mean...

I am sure when the stones arrive their will be directions, but thought I would ask here first..

Thanks

jomama45 04-06-2009 09:19 PM

I don't no how I didn't notice you were using a stackstone/no grout!? I must be blind. Either way, you can lay from the bottom, too. I cant say I've ever layed these stone in thinset, but maybe TS can elaborate why. I would still tint whatever you use to stick them, as it hard to remove any excess between this application, & you dont want gray block sticking thru either. When it comes to cutting, you can use a 4" diamond wheel in a grinder as deep as you can, snap the rest off. I useally try to pick a thinner (depth) stone to cut, & place against a deeper stone. Take your colored mortar/thinset & smear over cut end to help camoflauge.

Tscarborough 04-07-2009 08:32 AM

Thinset has much better adhesion. For this (all, really), application, the stone should be 100% back-buttered. That is the thinset should be applied to the back of the stone, not the wall surface. As a rule, if the stacked stone is dark, use gray, if light use white.

cips 04-08-2009 03:31 PM

Here are some updates
 
OK I am back:

I got my stones today here is the exact name on the box

Manufactuer: Lone Star Stone
Type: Architectural Stone Veneer; Cordova Ledgestone ( see link)
http://www.lonestarstone.com/ledge/cordova.html

I went on the website and DL 'dthe installation PDF:
http://www.lonestarstone.com/pdf/LoneStarsingle.pdf

After a quick glace, it seems quite complicated, it seems that they recommend the metal lathe etc? and I was thinking that I could pop these right to the cinderblock wall without any prep to the wall. I must admit the stones to have some weight to them, I think about 8-10 lbs per square foot? friggin boxes were heavy

Thoughts guys

P.S. I did call the customer service line and left a message with a rep to call em back. Again, thought I would ask here first

Bob Mariani 04-08-2009 03:34 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by cips (Post 257016)
OK I am back:

I got my stones today here is the exact name on the box

Manufactuer: Lone Star Stone
Type: Architectural Stone Veneer; Cordova Ledgestone ( see link)
http://www.lonestarstone.com/ledge/cordova.html

I went on the website and DL 'dthe installation PDF:
http://www.lonestarstone.com/pdf/LoneStarsingle.pdf

After a quick glace, it seems quite complicated, it seems that they recommend the metal lathe etc? and I was thinking that I could pop these right to the cinderblock wall without any prep to the wall. I must admit the stones to have some weight to them?

Thoughts guys

P.S. I did call the customer service line and left a message with a rep to call em back. Again, thought I would ask here first

The lathe is the way to go if they have some weight and that is their directions.

NJ Brickie 04-08-2009 03:57 PM

I would agree with TS. Thinset all the way. If the wall is pretty clean with no paint I would do exactly like TS said. No wire and butter the back of the stones. This type of stone you would want to start at the bottom. As far as the edges go, Did you order any corner stone? If the edge will be exposed you will need corner stone to have a finished edge. If not maybe you can trim around the area to hide the edge.

cips 04-08-2009 06:52 PM

Thanks again for the replies...

Well, the Lone Star Stone customer service/install guy gave me a call back right away. Like TS and Mariani originally recommended, he said if the concrete wall is clean and free of defects and agents, just butter them up real good and pop them in place. I also read the install PDF on the site more thoroughly versus my quick glance :wink: and under "Surface Preparation" for clean and untreated concrete, it says no further prep needed. It does say apply scratch coat as needed, but the tech guy said a scratch coat is not really needed. He did say laying them either bottom to top or top to bottom was fine either way, he kind lead toward the top to bottom just due to the less likely hood of drippings getting on the stone. NJ Brickie: I did not get corner stones as the concrete wall is kinda depressed into the wall, so no right angle edges etc..I should be able to just butt them up with some cutting here and there of course.

One more question ( Sorry, true amateur here )

According to the install PDF for Mortar components, it says 1 part type N or S masonry cement with 2-3 parts masonry sand or 1 part portland with 1 part lime and 5-7 parts sand. It also says for Dry Stacking ( which is what this stone is ) it recommends to add latex modifier or bonding agent to above mixes.

I have in my garage a couple left over 50lb bags of Laticrete Grey Multi purpose 253 Gold thin-set Mortar (no joke, the name is that long) which I used about a year and 1/2 ago when I tiled the basement. I did not see any reference to type N or S...you guys think I can use this stuff..I read the directions on the bag and it did did say can be used stone along with tiles etc..

Tscarborough 04-08-2009 06:56 PM

Exactly advantage what will lathing provide? Nothing at all is the correct answer. Over clean concrete or masonry, thinset them and go. If you are concerned with warranty issues, read the stupid warranty. It provides NO remedies for adhesion issues under any circumstance.

I have sold 10s of thousands of Sq Ft of Faux stone for, and applied 1000s in exactly the manner I describe.

Tscarborough 04-08-2009 06:57 PM

If the thinset you have is not lumpy, use it.

cips 04-08-2009 07:58 PM

TS- Word Up :thumbsup:

When I used the thin-set for my floor tiles. It mixed up nice & smooth with hardly any lumps. The mixing drill bit came in handy..best $20 bucks I ever spent on a tool. Worked like a charm and saved a lot of manual work. I must admit, I kinda eyeball the measurements when adding mortar and water ( prob not the best thing to do)..I make sure it is not to watery or too thick..I go for a somewhat peanut butter consistency, maybe a bit thicker, that is easy to spread but holds it's shape...

Well..looks like I may be in good shape..just gotta buy a masonary blade for cuts and a new trowel and I thinik I am good to go.

T.S. Should I forget about adding a bonding agent?

Tscarborough 04-09-2009 07:23 AM

It already has bonding agents in it. For wall application, mix it a little drier than for tile.


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