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Old 09-12-2007, 12:29 PM   #1
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Which goes in first?


Almost done with my addition.......

I am putting laminate florring down in the hallway and pre-hung doors from the hallway to each bedroom, etc.

Which do I install first? floor or doors?

thanks!

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Old 09-12-2007, 01:31 PM   #2
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Which goes in first?


I'd do doors, floor, then trim.

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Old 09-12-2007, 02:24 PM   #3
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Which goes in first?


You do the floors first, then trim & set the doors to fit.
Any other way is ridiculous.
Stop & THINK about it...
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Old 09-12-2007, 02:47 PM   #4
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Which goes in first?


Ithought doing the doors after the fllor creates a better finished look....but I was concerned because the laminate floor is supposed to be "floating"
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Old 09-12-2007, 03:41 PM   #5
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Which goes in first?


but couldn't figure out what does the "laminating floor being floating" has anything to do with this?....

my vote is door last also...
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Old 09-12-2007, 05:22 PM   #6
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Which goes in first?


ALWAYS - Do the laminate floor first (when you have a choice)

That way, you leave your laminate's expansion gap between the floors and any edges (like the door rough opening) and the gap gets covered-over by the bottom of the door jambs and their corresponding casings. It's functional and clean looking.

Otherwise, you would have to go back and cut out all the door jambs with a cut-off saw or jamb saw in order to slide the laminate floor under it. (which is the proper method to install a floating laminate floor, when the doors are already in place)....
Why in the world would you want to do all that cutting on your hands and knees, when you can make your life so much easier by installing the door "over" the flooring?

Last edited by AtlanticWBConst.; 09-12-2007 at 05:42 PM.
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Old 09-13-2007, 07:50 AM   #7
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Which goes in first?


Okay, Atlantic, I understand, but should the door framing sit on the floor, or have a small gap? (do I have to get out a "feeler gauge" from my lawnmower repairing days?) this was my concern with doing the floor first.
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Old 09-13-2007, 07:27 PM   #8
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Which goes in first?


Quote:
Originally Posted by mt232 View Post
Okay, Atlantic, I understand, but should the door framing sit on the floor, or have a small gap? (do I have to get out a "feeler gauge" from my lawnmower repairing days?) this was my concern with doing the floor first.
It can sit right over the floor. You can leave a 1/16" gap and that should suffice, unless you were living in a very humid region/area. If that were the case, you could leave 1/8" and fill it in with a color matched caulking (color of the door casing). Otherwise, you'll be fine.
The concept of a floating floor (laminate) is the point of allowing it to expand and contract. The main concern is laterall movement horizontally. If the floor expands and does not have the space to do so lengthwise (i.e.= expansion gap on the edges), it can buckle or ripple.
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Old 09-13-2007, 07:42 PM   #9
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Which goes in first?


Just call me old fashion... Flooring last except for final punch out.
**** (stuf) happens do you want it to happen on your new finished floor?

Yes it is possible to save a few man hours. I don't feel it is worth the risk.
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Old 09-18-2007, 12:48 PM   #10
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Which goes in first?


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Just call me old fashion... Flooring last except for final punch out.
**** (stuf) happens do you want it to happen on your new finished floor?

Yes it is possible to save a few man hours. I don't feel it is worth the risk.
Ditto. The only tedious area would be between the door jambs (threshold), which I cut the floor to an exact fit. Other than that, the trim will cover the ends.

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