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-   -   Getting Rid of Case Iron Piping from Boiler & Ceiling (http://www.diychatroom.com/f2/getting-rid-case-iron-piping-boiler-ceiling-127318/)

management 12-21-2011 05:14 PM

Getting Rid of Case Iron Piping from Boiler & Ceiling
 
3 Attachment(s)
I recently paid an abatement company to remove all the boiler asbestos insulation. I have all this case iron piping come from the boiler. But if you look at the pictures about half of the piping for the boiler is not even connected to the boiler. It's just distribution piping that does nothing.

Attachment 42890

Attachment 42891

Also, I notice that some small piping and much of the old electrical is ran right under the subfloor. They also looked like they dropped the ceiling so I would love to raise the ceiling back up. Would it be expensive to move these pipes up under the floor joints? This is a basement shot.

Attachment 42892

1910NE 12-21-2011 06:28 PM

That looks a lot like my basement, except mine is all old steam pipe (and there was never any insulation.) It's still in use for the current hot water radiators. As for moving all that plumbing? Yeah, I think it would be expensive to relocate it. Wouldn't do it personally unless there was a serious need to.

management 12-21-2011 08:17 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by 1910NE
That looks a lot like my basement, except mine is all old steam pipe (and there was never any insulation.) It's still in use for the current hot water radiators. As for moving all that plumbing? Yeah, I think it would be expensive to relocate it. Wouldn't do it personally unless there was a serious need to.

Well I have to remove the useless piping. Half of it is not even connected to the boiler. I'd like to know from everyone if it's worth anything and if I can get someone to take it out if I let them keep it. Any suggestions?

Also the ceiling was dropped below the old ceiling. I plan to replace the 30 year old boiler.

jburd964 12-21-2011 09:45 PM

You may find someone to haul it off for free but I doubt they would take it for total payment of removal. Get you a saws all and go to town cutting or out. With a pocket full of new blades and a days work you could knock it out. If you have away to haul the scrap pipe to the recycle yard you could buy enough beer for the weekend.

I'm not a professional., But I did stay at Holiday Inn Express last night.

danpik 12-22-2011 07:46 AM

The last time I had to remove a bunch of old steel pipe like that I used a two pound hammer. Several good whacks, and I mean hard ones, will crack the cast elbows. I removed about 500 lbs of pipe in about 1 hour that way. My brother was trying to cut it with his sawzall and managed to get thru one pipe joint in the time it took me to break about 10. I had him cut the hangers with it instead. Wear safety glasses and leather gloves when doing this.
Dan

oh'mike 12-22-2011 07:56 AM

You don't want some scrap guy in your basement with a saws all---pay a pro or do it yourself.

If you are installing a new boiler--have the heating company tag the old pipes to be removed.

By the way --that is steel pipe--not cast iron

Reapp@cox.net 12-22-2011 04:41 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by management

Well I have to remove the useless piping. Half of it is not even connected to the boiler. I'd like to know from everyone if it's worth anything and if I can get someone to take it out if I let them keep it. Any suggestions?

Also the ceiling was dropped below the old ceiling. I plan to replace the 30 year old boiler.

Why would you replace the boiler. I see boilers that are 50 years or more frequently. I would just have a furnace guy that knows about boilers (many don't) clean and adjust. For 150 bucks or so you will have a system that will work for years with regular maintenance. Plus he can tell you the story on the pipe. I would want to be sure those pipes are really not needed. I do home inspections and hot water and steam heat is a big thing in houses built in the early 1900's. I don't ever remember one with disconnected pipes. Perhaps what your seeing are old galvanized water pipes that were replaced with copper or plastic. Still I would want somebody that knows looking at the pipes before I would remove them. A pipe that you thought was unused and suddenly starts spurting running water can cause quite a mess. I sure would want to know where the main water shut off was before I started

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ernieb19 10-22-2013 04:05 PM

use a 4 inche metal cutter, cost about $20.00 , each disc $1.50. easy fast and safe, didhttp://ts3.mm.bing.net/th?id=H.45907...7&rs=1&pid=1.7 it in my basement, and sold the scrap.

gregzoll 10-22-2013 04:55 PM

ernieb19, did you happen to look at the date of the thread that you resurrected?

bbo 10-22-2013 05:52 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by gregzoll (Post 1256716)
ernieb19, did you happen to look at the date of the thread that you resurrected?

maybe the op is as good at procrastinating as I am.:thumbup:


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