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Old 08-10-2008, 03:37 PM   #1
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gas stove installation


We are installing a new gas stove where there was once electric. My son is a HVAC installer and said we can use flexible gas lines from the main gas line in the basement to the stove (approximately 60 feet). I am only aware of the standard iron pipe. Is he correct about this? Pros and cons? Any info would be appreciated.

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Old 08-11-2008, 07:15 PM   #2
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gas stove installation


There is a Flexible Gas line that is mentioned in prev. threads for this purpose, but I would rather have Black Iron pipe over any flexible piping.

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Old 08-11-2008, 09:26 PM   #3
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gas stove installation


What your son is talking about is called corrugated stainless steel tubing, or CSST. It commonly is sold under the names WardFlex, GasTite, or TracPipe. It is not usually a DIY product. I've heard of people buying it, but the distribution is largely protected to plumbers only. I'd plan on having a plumber do it. The major benefit is that there don't have to be all sorts of joints, elbows, unions...And all the labor involved in running it. It is very flexible and comes in very long rolls.

I think it is a great product and strongly reccommend its use. From a safety standpoint, black iron pipe doesn't have anything on correctly installed CSST. Correct installation involves electrical bonding as required by 2 of the 3 manufacturers and protection from nail/screw impact if it is running in finished walls.

Nothing wrong with black iron pipe. Lots more joints, which makes leak testing even more critical. Have your job priced both ways and go from there.

Either way, be sure that the 60' run of pipe is correctly sized to the BTU/H demands of your new stove. 1/2" pipe may very well not do the trick! In some cases, 3/4" pipe won't even do the trick. A lot of plumbers do not know how to size the pipe correctly, so make sure they pull a permit to ensure that you're getting a proper installation.
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