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-   -   Gas Dryer - Electric Dryer (http://www.diychatroom.com/f2/gas-dryer-electric-dryer-29711/)

gannys 10-10-2008 05:36 PM

Gas Dryer - Electric Dryer
 
Hello,

I've recently moved into a furnished house with, what appears to be, a broken dryer. The dryer's exhaust doesn't seem to come out of the duct, but simply emits out of the back of the machine. This fills the entire room with a sickening humidity.

I'm trying to understand the health hazards of this as I haven't been feeling well lately. How can one tell if their dryer is gas or electric simply by looking at it? This dryer simply plugs into the wall and has no other connection whatsoever. Does this render it an 'electric dryer'?

A stupid question, perhaps. But, I'd like to confirm.

Thank you.

gannys 10-10-2008 05:45 PM

Also, according to this: http://www.buildersbest.com/indoor.htm (the article below), it can cause health problems.

DangerMouse 10-10-2008 06:14 PM

sounds like electric to me! also sounds like your exhaust duct is plugged. it needs a good cleaning, i'd guess. you'll probably need a few basic tools to open it up.

DM

micromind 10-10-2008 06:25 PM

Both types of dryers need electricity to operate. A gas dryer has a regular plug on it, and a gas connection, usually some sort of flexible corrugated tubing. An electric dryer has a much larger plug on it, about 2" in diameter.

All dryers have a 4" outlet in the back or the side, and must be vented outside. You've already found out why! If a gas dryer is not vented outside, the carbon monoxide (from burning gas) will be released into the house. This is a pretty dangerous situation.

Carbon monoxide isn't poisonous in and of itself, but it does displace oxygen. Human bodies need oxygen in order to stay alive. If you breathe carbon monoxide, the oxygen level in your blood goes down. You feel sleepy, and if you don't get some fresh air soon, you'll join the non-living. Car engines produce carbon monoxide, it's a well-known fact what happens if you run a car in an enclosed garage.

Either type of dryer emits very humid air and if vented indoors, will eventually cause mold. Mold will cause a myriad of health problems for most people.

Rob

Termite 10-10-2008 07:44 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by micromind (Post 170655)
Carbon monoxide isn't poisonous in and of itself, but it does displace oxygen. Human bodies need oxygen in order to stay alive. If you breathe carbon monoxide, the oxygen level in your blood goes down. You feel sleepy, and if you don't get some fresh air soon, you'll join the non-living. Car engines produce carbon monoxide, it's a well-known fact what happens if you run a car in an enclosed garage.

:no: Carbon monoxide itself is highly poisonous.

From Wikipedia...

Carbon monoxide is a significantly toxic gas, and CO poisoning is the most common type of fatal poisoning in many countries. Symptoms of mild poisoning include headaches, vertigo, and flu-like effects; larger exposures can lead to significant toxicity of the central nervous system, heart and even death. Following poisoning, long-term sequelae often occur. Carbon monoxide can also have severe effects on the fetus of a pregnant woman.
The mechanisms by which carbon monoxide produces toxic effects are not yet fully understood, but hemoglobin, myoglobin, and mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase are thought to be compromised.

Here's how little it takes for symptoms to occur...


The effects of carbon monoxide in parts per million are listed below:
  • 35 ppm (0.0035%) Headache and dizziness within six to eight hours of constant exposure
  • 100 ppm (0.01%) Slight headache in two to three hours
  • 200 ppm (0.02%) Slight headache within two to three hours
  • 400 ppm (0.04%) Frontal headache within one to two hours
  • 800 ppm (0.08%) Dizziness, nausea, and convulsions within 45 minutes. Insensible within two hours.
  • 1,600 ppm (0.16%) Headache, dizziness, and nausea within 20 minutes. Death in less than two hours.
  • 3,200 ppm (0.32%) Headache, dizziness and nausea in five to ten minutes. Death within 30 minutes.
  • 6,400 ppm (0.64%) Headache and dizziness in one to two minutes. Death in less than 20 minutes.
  • 12,800 ppm (1.28%) Unconsciousness after 2-3 breaths. Death in less than three minutes.
Carbon monoxide will kill you before you realize that anything's wrong. It is nothing to mess with.

Gannys, you need to verify that you don't have a gas dryer. Any unvented dryer is a fire hazard as well. If nothing's coming out of the vent, you probably need to have it professionally cleaned and serviced.

DangerMouse 10-11-2008 05:28 AM

by his own words, i'm PRETTY sure it's electric!

"This dryer simply plugs into the wall and has NO OTHER CONNECTION WHATSOEVER."

did you guys read the post? how about some answers how to FIX it now? =o)

DM

Termite 10-11-2008 09:43 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by MdangermouseM (Post 170810)
by his own words, i'm PRETTY sure it's electric!

"This dryer simply plugs into the wall and has NO OTHER CONNECTION WHATSOEVER."

did you guys read the post? how about some answers how to FIX it now? =o)

DM

Pretty sure isn't sure enough DM. Not in this case.

DangerMouse 10-11-2008 10:31 AM

of course you are correct (as usual) from a safety standpoint, but we still need to help the OP FIX the problem, yes? =o) so, grab a flashlight, look ALL around the machine to establish for sure. if electric, as posted above, it will be a 220v LARGE plug, not a standard "lamp or tv" 110v outlet and plug. (although they DO make 110v dryers. little mini apartment things. we have one stored.... "just in case".) even look UNDER the thing with the light, some 'creative' home installer may have even HIDDEN the gas line. (not likely, but you never know) if 100% sure it's electric, unplug it and disconnect the ducting and clean out ducts, this may be the only thing you have to do. if you find a big gob of damp lint, that would certainly cause what you describe. it would most likely be on the outside vent. you should go out and look at that first! might be as simple as pull the goop out and be done! but with it venting into the house, i doubt that will be all you need to do. if it were me, i'd also open the rear cover (front cover too, if applicable) and peek inside to be sure there is not a coating of lint all over the inside. i found that once. a hole inside the machine in the duct before it emerged from rear. a screw had let go on the cowling. big fire hazard there, just an extra precaution i would take. i imagine you will find some. finally, check seals around lint trap and door. they can 'open' and allow lint inside as well. you could do all this with a gas dryer as well, but more inspection would be advised, of course.

DM

hope this is better. Po)

gannys 10-13-2008 04:50 PM

Repaired
 
Thank you everyone for your responses. The problem is solved.

Strangely, this model has three separate portals for exhaust (2 of the 3 need to be covered by a plastic lid), and it appears that the lid on the back portal fell off somehow; thus releasing all of the exhaust into the house. Now that the lid is tightly secured on the 'rear portal', the exhaust is being fully released from the right-sided portal, whereon the duct leading to the outside is connected.

Seeing as I am not in the US now, the voltage is different (it is not 110v and 220v); however, the plug is a thick, three-pronged plug. Therefore, I can only suspect that it is electric (fortunately).

Thank you again.


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