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tripflex 11-16-2009 12:28 PM

Garage Ideas?
 
Alright so i plan on redoing my garage now that i have my 8k government check. Anyways, i want to refinish the floor, and was thinking about using some epoxy type stuff that i can pick up from home depot. I also need to install new lighting in the garage as there currently is none.

Any suggestions on the epoxy for the floor, or tips from someone who has already done it?

What about the lighting, i was just going to go with a bunch of fluorescent lighting that i could find on craigslist or just pick up at home depot. Any suggestions or ideas on that?


I also have another issue where the washer and dryer used to be in the garage i'm assuming, they are now in the first room you walk into from the garage. Thing is, there is a long vent running from the inside of the house, to the garage, along the floor all the way to the far wall where it hooks up to a vent.

Should i just build a box around the vent and have it go up into the ceiling, cut a hole in the roof and mount some kind of a vent box there? What options do i have for venting the dryer? I just don't want to have this long silver circular vent thing running along the floor of the garage.


Any other ideas or suggestions for the garage?! I've got a small closet also which i plan on putting a door on, but besides that don't really have many other ideas.

The whole garage already had drywall, i plan on repainting that and maybe putting a window air conditioner in, maybe a flat screen out there to watch sports if im working the garage, definitely a stereo...what else am i forgetting!?


Thanks guys!

stuart45 11-16-2009 12:54 PM

2 Attachment(s)
Quote:

Originally Posted by tripflex (Post 353794)
what else am i forgetting!?


Thanks guys!

One of these Attachment 14877
and one of theseAttachment 14878

RxScram 11-16-2009 01:17 PM

I would recommend against going with the big-box store epoxy, as they seem thin and not very durable. When I did my garage, I used the product from http://www.epoxy-coat.com, and had very good luck with it. They are a bit more expensive than the big-box store epoxy coatings (about 1.5-2 times as much), but they do have a lifetime warranty, and you end up with 5 times the epoxy thickness on the floor.

As far as application tips: Make sure you get the floor very clean and that you do a thorough job with the acid etching and cleanup. Getting the floor cleaned and prepped was a big challenge for me when I did mine. The previous owners of my house had converted the garage into an extra living room, so there was carpet over the concrete. Also, under half of the carpet was really old linoleum. It took me several days of water blasting, acid etching, chemical stripping, scraping, etc. to get all of the old adhesive off of the floor and to get the concrete to open up enough to get a good bond. Hopefully yours will be easier (most are!).

Do you have a garage door / opener? If not, you could install an opener with lights on it, then put in a couple 100W equivalent CFL's for lighting. We have that, plus a bathroom vanity light over our laundry area (with another 3 100W equivalent CFL's in it), and this results in plenty of light for our garage.

tripflex 11-16-2009 02:52 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by RxScram (Post 353816)
I would recommend against going with the big-box store epoxy, as they seem thin and not very durable. When I did my garage, I used the product from http://www.epoxy-coat.com, and had very good luck with it. They are a bit more expensive than the big-box store epoxy coatings (about 1.5-2 times as much), but they do have a lifetime warranty, and you end up with 5 times the epoxy thickness on the floor.

As far as application tips: Make sure you get the floor very clean and that you do a thorough job with the acid etching and cleanup. Getting the floor cleaned and prepped was a big challenge for me when I did mine. The previous owners of my house had converted the garage into an extra living room, so there was carpet over the concrete. Also, under half of the carpet was really old linoleum. It took me several days of water blasting, acid etching, chemical stripping, scraping, etc. to get all of the old adhesive off of the floor and to get the concrete to open up enough to get a good bond. Hopefully yours will be easier (most are!).

Do you have a garage door / opener? If not, you could install an opener with lights on it, then put in a couple 100W equivalent CFL's for lighting. We have that, plus a bathroom vanity light over our laundry area (with another 3 100W equivalent CFL's in it), and this results in plenty of light for our garage.


Yeah seems like mine might be a little easier but the previous owner painted the concrete with two different colors so i'm assuming i'm going to have to do something about that. It looks like about $300 for a 2 car garage without the clear coat. Did you get clear coat also? Not really sure if it will make a difference or not?

RxScram 11-16-2009 03:10 PM

What did they use to paint the floor? If it is concrete stain, then you can probably leave it and just do the normal cleaning/etching steps (as detailed on the instructions from epoxy-coat). If it's latex or another epoxy, then you will probably have to remove it.

I did not use a clear coat, and am very happy with how glossy the floor is.

vsheetz 11-16-2009 03:50 PM

I did my garage floor with the Rustoleum kit from Home Depot a couple years ago. Looks good and has not given any issues. Getting the concrete clean and degreased is of prime importance with any concrete covering. Just follow the instructions - was pretty easy.

Thurman 11-16-2009 07:41 PM

tripflex, you asked for opinions, so I'm sharing mine. First let's address the dryer issue: a dryer vent should be as short of a run as possible, with the inside of the vent run as smooth as possible. That said, consider how you can shorten your dryer vent, and I prefer using the aluminum sheet metal dryer duct material. Venting it up and through a ceiling and the roof is not forbidden, if done properly. Your drying time benefits from shorter runs so the warm, moist air can escape as quickly as possible. A commercial or semi-commercial garage floor coating if much more preferable than the big box store coatings, even though I am a fan of the Rust-Oleum garage floor coating. Sherwin-Williams, Porter Paints, etc., sell better coatings than the box stores, and yes they cost a little more, but worth it. As stated--proper preparation is the key to a good bond. In your location, which is where?, would insulating the walls be worth re-doing the drywall? OR-the blown-in type that uses large holes drilled into the drywall. Speaking of insulation, how about your garage door? Would it be worth insulating that? There are previous post on here about doing just this. The wet bar with barmaid may be a good idea, depends on IF there is another party involved in decisions :whistling2:. Do take time to plan on what you want before doing, it's certainly better than backing up to do things over, ask me how I know that one. Good Luck, David OH--as far as lighting: I highly recommend that you do not use the $10-$12 two tube flourescent "shop light" fixtures from anywhere. In my "lot's of" experience with these, they last about six months then the ballast start acting up. New ballast cost about the same as the complete light fixture, spend a few more dollars and get a better flourescent light fixture. I wound up replacing all 18 units in my shop after three years with units bought from a local electrical supply house. Monies spent was probably 30% higher but they are still working after five years.

Maintenance 6 11-17-2009 06:24 AM

Check the owners manual for your dryer. It should give you the maximum allowed length for the vent pipe. Use metal duct, not the plastic slinky crap. Before you apply epoxy coating on your garage, tape a 2'x2' piece of 6 mil poly to the floor. After a couple of days remove it and look to see if there is any moisture on the concrete or the under side of the plastic sheet. If it's dry, you're probably good, if not, then forego the epoxy. Epoxies don't breath and any vapor trapped under the coating will lift it. Add more receptacles. Garages never have enough.

What have I done 11-18-2009 05:23 AM

have you looked at www.garagejournal.com yet? Those boys have tried every kind of flooring. Lots of suggestions and it is ALL GARAGES big and small.. pretty cool place to check out

tripflex 12-07-2009 04:24 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by What have I done (Post 354594)
have you looked at www.garagejournal.com yet? Those boys have tried every kind of flooring. Lots of suggestions and it is ALL GARAGES big and small.. pretty cool place to check out

Awesome! I've never seen that website but now i think im gonna steal some ideas :)

Quote:

Originally Posted by Thurman
tripflex, you asked for opinions, so I'm sharing mine. First let's address the dryer issue: a dryer vent should be as short of a run as possible, with the inside of the vent run as smooth as possible. That said, consider how you can shorten your dryer vent, and I prefer using the aluminum sheet metal dryer duct material. Venting it up and through a ceiling and the roof is not forbidden, if done properly. Your drying time benefits from shorter runs so the warm, moist air can escape as quickly as possible. A commercial or semi-commercial garage floor coating if much more preferable than the big box store coatings, even though I am a fan of the Rust-Oleum garage floor coating. Sherwin-Williams, Porter Paints, etc., sell better coatings than the box stores, and yes they cost a little more, but worth it. As stated--proper preparation is the key to a good bond. In your location, which is where?, would insulating the walls be worth re-doing the drywall? OR-the blown-in type that uses large holes drilled into the drywall. Speaking of insulation, how about your garage door? Would it be worth insulating that? There are previous post on here about doing just this. The wet bar with barmaid may be a good idea, depends on IF there is another party involved in decisions . Do take time to plan on what you want before doing, it's certainly better than backing up to do things over, ask me how I know that one. Good Luck, David OH--as far as lighting: I highly recommend that you do not use the $10-$12 two tube flourescent "shop light" fixtures from anywhere. In my "lot's of" experience with these, they last about six months then the ballast start acting up. New ballast cost about the same as the complete light fixture, spend a few more dollars and get a better flourescent light fixture. I wound up replacing all 18 units in my shop after three years with units bought from a local electrical supply house. Monies spent was probably 30% higher but they are still working after five years.

Thanks for the input. What kind of light fixtures do you suggest then? I HATE HATE when florescent lights flicker so i absolutely want to avoid that. As for the dryer vent i'm still not sure what to do, it leaves me in a really odd situation. I'll probably take some good pictures and post a new thread once i start on my garage project.

vsheetz 12-07-2009 04:41 PM

I have redone our attached two car garage into a hobby room - housing my wife's sewing/quilting and my ham radio and light repair bench. In relation to your questions, here is what we did and have been very happy with the outcome.
  • Rustoleum expoxy painted the floor with the chips - looks very nice, has been durable for two years now. Proper concrete prep is the key item here.
  • Painted the walls and ceiling (we started with bare studs so drywalled and insulated as well).
  • Installed a dozen recessed can lights in the ceiling (on thier own circuit). Plus a couple 4' flouresent shop fixures about my work table area.
  • Installed new outlets down two sides, each side a 20 amp circuit (one other side had existing outlets, the washer/dryer, water heater, etc., and the other is the 16' garage door).
  • For HVAC installed a GE Terminal Package Unit to provide for heat (heat pump) and A/C. This is a unit like you see in hotels mounted under the window. Cost about $1000 landed, with thermostat and all needed to mount/install it. It works great.
  • Four big storage cabinets.
  • Television mounted up on the wall so to be viewable from most anywhere in the room.
  • Enclosed the side with washer/dryer, and other utilities - folding doors so can be put out of sight.
Everything permitted and inspected and finished nicely - making a considerable value add to the property.

We use the room a lot and enjoy it. Proper lighting and good HVAC is essential.

Phillysun 12-15-2009 03:28 PM

After calculating the cost for the preparation and epoxy paint I decided to use vinyl instead. Problem with paint is it wears out first where there is the most traffic or where you turn in one spot like around a work bench. Anything dragged across, like a metal sawhorse, will remove the paint. I opted for vinyl squares which were no more expensive overall, and if one is damaged it is easy to replace just that one vinyl square. With the plant based vinyl you have a green product and with the commercial variety the color goes all the way through the material so gouges are not very noticeable.

If you do opt for paint wear a paint grade respirator and use a high CFM fan to keep the area as free of fumes as possible.

JohnAppleton 12-16-2009 07:03 PM

What is the 8k government check? Is this some kind of grant for home improvements?

Scuba_Dave 12-16-2009 07:06 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by JohnAppleton (Post 367864)
What is the 8k government check? Is this some kind of grant for home improvements?

no...home buyer promotion to get people to buy


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