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Old 03-06-2010, 05:00 PM   #1
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External Opening


Should have noticed this sooner...

Since moving in three years ago we've noticed that our dining room floor (window side) is extremely cold. In our basement, the window near this part of the dining room has a considerable draft. In Dec, I worked on insulating it better until I can replace it. A few days ago, I explored the area on the outside of the house.



I noticed this piece hanging down but never looked closer. (I know. I need to direct the downspout away from the house, another project, especially since I do get some water in the basement)



When I explored further, here is what I saw:



A closer look


I guess this is the foundation of the house. What is the best way to address this problem? Thanks for taking a look!


Last edited by joetab24; 03-16-2010 at 08:20 PM.
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Old 03-06-2010, 05:08 PM   #2
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Is this a crawl space area ?
I don't see any insulation up ther
Possible someone enclosed a 3 season porch & never insulated the floor

How big is this opening ?

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Old 03-06-2010, 07:38 PM   #3
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External Opening



Dave, the opening I discovered is to the right of my DR windows. It's not a crawl space. And, as you pointed out, there is no insulation.

Last edited by joetab24; 03-06-2010 at 07:41 PM.
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Old 03-06-2010, 08:05 PM   #4
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Ah ...I see....I'd say there isn't any insulation from the pic
I'd pull it all down & put insulation up there
Then put a piece of plywood back in to close it up
Prime & paint the plywood before you put it in
I'd also consider just closing off the whole area under the window

Maybe brick or something else
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Old 03-06-2010, 08:15 PM   #5
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I'd layer rigid foam insulation between the joists and rigid foam on the bottom of the joists with air sealing for a thermal break, then ply or other cover: http://www.buildingscience.com/docum...n-crawlspaces/ Extend some flat metal flashing to hide the extra thickness and serve as a drip edge, paint to suit.

Be safe, Gary
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Old 03-10-2010, 04:27 PM   #6
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thanks for the help....i found another similar opening closer to the front of the house....and I thought I had closed all openings for rodents!




is it necessary to paint the plywood i use to cover the opening, after I insulate it? It's not visible. Is there another reason why painting should be done?


also, GBR mentioned "air sealing for a thermal break"....not sure what is meant by that?

thanks!
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Old 03-11-2010, 02:00 AM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by joetab24
is it necessary to paint the plywood i use to cover the opening, after I insulate it? It's not visible. Is there another reason why painting should be done?
Yes, painting it will help keep it safe from the elements - wind, water, etc.

Quote:
Originally Posted by joetab24
also, GBR mentioned "air sealing for a thermal break"....not sure what is meant by that?
When it comes to insulation, having an air-tight seal is one of the best things you can do. His explanation was just suggesting to create an air-tight barrior to block out drafts and such.
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Old 03-16-2010, 04:58 PM   #8
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used some hydraulic cement....plugged the hole up with some steel wool and filled it with cement. not 100%...maybe add some caulk?

Before



After



Space next to window


Filled the hole w/some caulk saver...I am planning on adding some steel wool and then cement...is this the right approach?




Some other concerns.....the more I look, the more I find

electrical wire to addition....is this safe?


this is the exterior area where I think the water is getting into the basement due to some openings and poor grading.

main electrical wire to meter...caulk?




fairly large opening....best way to fill?



lots of flaking and some openings on side of house and at floor level....I have lots of work to do out here

Last edited by joetab24; 03-16-2010 at 08:22 PM.
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Old 03-17-2010, 06:20 PM   #9
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External Opening


Just to update and clarify my best course of action.



Some openings on outside of my house.





I know part of my dining room gets really cold in the winter. Sure enough, when I looked outside, I found some openings.









So it seems like in order to do address the cold section of floor....I am going to have to remove the plywood that's there, and stuff insulation up here....not sure how far I will be able to get.


Last edited by joetab24; 03-18-2010 at 11:31 AM.
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Old 03-20-2010, 07:24 PM   #10
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If it was me, I would remove as much as possible to see if it's done right.

For larger, flat areas, you can put up some insulation (spray foam, foam board, fiberglass...) and then attach some painted plywood to seal it in.

For smaller openings, you can use the mortar mix or some spray foam, your choice. Main thing is getting it sealed to prevent draft and critters from getting in your house.
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Old 03-20-2010, 08:29 PM   #11
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"If it was me, I would remove as much as possible to see if it's done right."

What would be the easiest way to open this up? As you can see, even though it's open, there are long boards..I am curious to see what's there, or more likely not there.

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