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-   -   Drywall Texture Part 2 (some pics) (http://www.diychatroom.com/f2/drywall-texture-part-2-some-pics-5402/)

AlbrightPM 12-16-2006 12:04 PM

Drywall Texture Part 2 (some pics)
 
After doing some research and reading, as well as the help I received here, I hung some scrap pieces of rock on some bare studded walls in a room I'm remodeling. I did four types of textures, all by hand. Two are regular thinned mud and the other two I mixed sand with the mud.

All mud was rolled on with a 3/8" nap 9" paint roller.

Here's the regular "smooth" mud. The left half is a brushed finish (some old wisk-type brush the wife had laying around). The right half is the same, but tried to knock it down after it set a bit. I used a 11" trowel to knock the texture back. Looks okay, but next time I would wait a few more minutes to allow the mud to set up.

http://img.villagephotos.com/p/2003-...uresmooth1.jpg

AlbrightPM 12-16-2006 12:05 PM

Here's another "no-sand" texture. I bought a tile-setting trowel at HD. Has fine teeth on one side, smooth on the other. A free-hand "swooping" action leaves a nice texture that isn't too bold, yet gives a good balance of smooth trowel marks as well as toothed marks. I'm gonna use this on some walls that need a texture to cover up some minor blemishes (old plaster that I had to patch after updating the wiring).

http://img.villagephotos.com/p/2003-...uresmooth2.jpg

AlbrightPM 12-16-2006 12:10 PM

This is one of the sand/mud textures I tried. Again, the mud was applied heavily with a regular ol' paint roller. Most pro's recommend using white quartz sand. I didn't have any for immediate use, so I raided the kid's sand box. There is a large variation in play sand (not to mention the dirt), as you can see in the pics. The larger sand tends to drag across under the trowel. This textures was made by rolling the mud on and then doing the afore mentioned "swooping" action with a regular mud trowel. Its a course texture. I would hesitate to do this on walls unless you have some real "nasties" to hide. Its a ceiling texture, no doubt. I have an apartment building I bought and 50% of the walls are like this. Its a bear to paint... especially when doing drastic color changes.


http://img.villagephotos.com/p/2003-...xturesand1.jpg

AlbrightPM 12-16-2006 12:17 PM

This is the second sand/mud texture I tried. Again, the mud was rolled onto the wall, a little on the heavier side. The old brush I was using was originally "swooped"... the I tried a few strokes in a "X" type pattern... kinda like random hash marks. The wife like that the best, so I kept up the randon "X" pattern throughout. Looks okay, and I think we'll be doing this on some ceilings, so the "boss" says. Its a course texture with the sand in. If I would have used the bagged quartz sand, the texture would be more consistant, but I had to use what was on hand. The playsand varies in size and of course shows no consistancy in texture... but maybe thats what you are after.

http://img.villagephotos.com/p/2003-...xturesand2.jpg

AlbrightPM 12-16-2006 12:25 PM

That's all for today. Let me hear your thoughts or ideas. I'm a rank amatuer at this texturing stuff. Textures are not for everything (or everybody), but if you gotta hide something or want to add spice to a room, its the hot set-up. Hope someone found this helpful.

Enjoy!!

steve

AtlanticWBConst. 12-16-2006 06:22 PM

AlbrightPM,

My first thoughts are that it is was put on too thin, the thickness of the texture before you 'pattern' it should be about 3/8" thick. When you brush or pattern it, you should not be hitting any sheetrock surface....(Like it appears in your first 2 pics)

AtlanticWBConst. 12-16-2006 06:25 PM

Also, the last pic: We used to do a pattern similar to this about 20 years ago. The key is to random pattern it more (rather than the criss-cross pattern that appears in the pic).
The random pattern can be done by simply 'spinning' slightly as you look up at the ceiling while doing the brush strokes...

AlbrightPM 12-16-2006 10:54 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by AtlanticWBConst. (Post 27071)
AlbrightPM,

My first thoughts are that it is was put on too thin, the thickness of the texture before you 'pattern' it should be about 3/8" thick. When you brush or pattern it, you should not be hitting any sheetrock surface....(Like it appears in your first 2 pics)


The mud is thicker than it looks. I took the pics while the mud was still wet. The board doesn't show through. I got a good coat on with the rollor. Works quite well/

steve

AlbrightPM 12-16-2006 10:55 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by AtlanticWBConst. (Post 27072)
Also, the last pic: We used to do a pattern similar to this about 20 years ago. The key is to random pattern it more (rather than the criss-cross pattern that appears in the pic).


The random pattern can be done by simply 'spinning' slightly as you look up at the ceiling while doing the brush strokes...

I see what you mean. I have some of the sand/mud mixture left. I can do another peice on some scrap drywall and try that technique.

steve

AtlanticWBConst. 12-17-2006 07:16 AM

AlbrightPM,

You are off to a good start. The key is to get the practice in before you start an actual ceiling. See if you can find more scrap sheetrock and find a pattern that you feel good about, and practice it alot....get comfortable with it...consistency too.

wannabuild 12-22-2006 04:16 PM

My Ceiling Texture - EASY
 
For what it's worth - I agonized about how to texture cathedral ceiling in my Liv. room. Then I think i red this in F Homebuilding Mag.
Put texture on in random thick coats. 1/16" to 3/16" thick or so. Use a large cement trowel & OR Lg drywall knife. Wait a while (checking it all time) until "mud" will stick to drywall knife and pulls some of it away when you lift the knife. When ready - take a regular 8" taping knife and sort of tap & pull (holding knife almost flat to surface) while at same time rotating the knife in a random fashion. Also - go over same area but at right angles from the first time you did it creating "criss cross" lines.
You will get 8" lines but because the goo pulls it makes kinda rounded "edges" to the lines so they are not obviously made with a straight tool.
You also have to do a "knock" down with a 12" knife to flatten out the larger spikey lumps. Also might sand or trowel edge after it drys.
I guess it looks kinda like big snowflakes when done.
Didn't practice hardley at all b4 hand and it turned out great. Really easy to do. So far hasn't collected any dust like a popcorn or gnarllier texture might.

AlbrightPM 12-22-2006 05:47 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by AtlanticWBConst. (Post 27110)
AlbrightPM,

You are off to a good start. The key is to get the practice in before you start an actual ceiling. See if you can find more scrap sheetrock and find a pattern that you feel good about, and practice it alot....get comfortable with it...consistency too.

For walls, I really like the regular mud textured with a toothed tile trowel. Nothing fancy, easy to learn and does the job.

Ceilings I'm still considering a few options. I might try a few more patterns with different tools.

steve


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