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-   -   Drywall/plaster Texture? (http://www.diychatroom.com/f2/drywall-plaster-texture-5053/)

AlbrightPM 11-27-2006 04:58 PM

Drywall/plaster Texture?
 
I have a project coming up that involves a home with original plaster walls. The plaster is still solid, so no reason to rip it out.

There are spots where it was patched over years. Previous owner did a poor job of it, and it shows. This place hasn't been painted in 30 years (imagine puke green and bright canary-yellow!)

Add to this, I will be re-wiring the entire building. So I will need to cut some access holes at the ceiling/wall corners and any other place I can't fish a wire through. I've done plenty of drywall in my day, so professionaly patching these cut-outs are no biggie.

Anyways, I'd like to texture the existing plaster (as well as my dryall patches). I never did texture before. I've seen texture sprayers in use and I might go that route if need be. I also have read of textures being rolled on with a big 'ol shaggy roller. I also have seen ceilings "troweled" in a texture.

If anyone has any suggestions how to proceed with this project, please reply. I would greatly appreciate it.

steve

AtlanticWBConst. 11-27-2006 06:36 PM

Well,

To start, Texturing is not as easy as people think it is. Sure, you can slap some compound onto a wall with a brush, roller, sponge, sprayer, etc....
There is a definite technique to it. For example, putting it on at a consistent depth, consistent pattern, not having heavy 'peaks' (This is where all the first timers mess up), etc....etc...

I have to say, we (those who do it) and ALOT of your average people in general can always tell (Clearly see) the difference between a professional texturing job and a " I can do that" job.
... In over 20 years in the business and seeing literally thousands of texturings, I have never seen a DIY texture job, or a "I can do that" Texture job that didn't look bad...

It may sound harsh, but, it is the truth....and I am not the only one to say that....

- That's my 2 cents -

AlbrightPM 11-27-2006 06:58 PM

I'll be honest... I've done lots of drywall over the years. A typical finishing job doesn't scare me. But I never did a textured finish before. I'm ignorant. No problem admitting it.

I've done some reading on techniques, but that doesn't count as experience. I need someone to point me in the right direction.

Thanks so far.

steve

Smokey 12-10-2006 01:06 PM

Saw your post on the professional side but couldn't reply cuz I'm a DIY. You were asking for pics of textures on the professional forum. Well I'm just starting internet search to find out "how to" on texutres & found site which shows good pics on various textures. Here is a link. Hope this helps.

http://www.drywallschool.com/textures.htm

Does anyone know any sites that tell you "how to" do knockdown texture? I'm doing accent wall with Venetian plaster and want to change the existing texture to knockdown for ceiling and remaining walls. I'm willing to sand down current sand wall texture and scrape popcorn ceiling.

AlbrightPM 12-10-2006 06:35 PM

Found that site while searching out the subject. I was hoping to find a book or two on amazon.com that would be dedicated to textures. Looking at something that can be trowled on with sand in it, then floated for an even thickness.

steve

AtlanticWBConst. 12-10-2006 08:26 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by AlbrightPM (Post 26547)
Found that site while searching out the subject. I was hoping to find a book or two on amazon.com that would be dedicated to textures. Looking at something that can be trowled on with sand in it, then floated for an even thickness.

steve


Just so you know:
We apply the 'thick' texture with a paint roller (This is how it is applied with an even thickness) .....and then, it is troweled or brushed to a textured pattern.

It is rolled on like paint in an area roughly 6'x6', no more than that at a time..or it will start to dry (your results will look like a patched quilt), then rolled on perpendicular.... like a 'graph'. Criss/cross. Roll it on in one direction (6x6) and then roll on another 'layer' in the other direction (6x6)....That is how to get it even in thickness. The edges are 'blended' in a random pattern...again, so it won't look like a 'patchwork' quilt.

As mentioned earlier in this thread...this takes alot of practice to get it to look right....

And then, of course there are other textures.... that are applied with a spray...

AlbrightPM 12-11-2006 05:49 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by AtlanticWBConst. (Post 26564)

Just so you know:
We apply the 'thick' texture with a paint roller (This is how it is applied with an even thickness) .....and then, it is troweled or brushed to a textured pattern.

Are you talking about the mud with sand mixed in, or just texturing in general??


Quote:

And then, of course there are other textures.... that are applied with a spray...
I'm trying to stay away from sprayed textured in the event I would need to repair and area. Just a preference.

steve

AtlanticWBConst. 12-11-2006 07:55 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by AlbrightPM (Post 26654)
Are you talking about the mud with sand mixed in, or just texturing in general??steve

Yes,...'mud' or compound with sand mixed in...

AlbrightPM 12-11-2006 08:44 PM

Okay, Thanks for the info. Is there a certain sand I should be buying?? I think I read somewhere that "quartz sand" was the way to go... while another source says any ol' sand will do.

Also, whats the rule of thumb on texturing new un-painted drywall? Again, some sources say to prime and other recommend to texture bare board (after taping, of course).

Thanks again!

steve

stuccoman 12-12-2006 08:39 AM

ABPM ,


Do you have some pictures of what you are trying to match?

AtlanticWBConst. 12-12-2006 11:27 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by AlbrightPM (Post 26679)
Okay, Thanks for the info. Is there a certain sand I should be buying?? I think I read somewhere that "quartz sand" was the way to go... while another source says any ol' sand will do.

Also, whats the rule of thumb on texturing new un-painted drywall? Again, some sources say to prime and other recommend to texture bare board (after taping, of course).

Thanks again!

steve

It's called 'SILICA' sand. Drywall, plaster or building materials wharehouses carry it in a bag.

New unpainted drywall may be textured.
What we do is add about 1 cup of paint (flat white) to each bucket full of texture/compound mix. ...comes out nice and white.

AlbrightPM 12-12-2006 10:34 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by AtlanticWBConst. (Post 26729)
It's called 'SILICA' sand. Drywall, plaster or building materials wharehouses carry it in a bag.

New unpainted drywall may be textured.
What we do is add about 1 cup of paint (flat white) to each bucket full of texture/compound mix. ...comes out nice and white.


Thanks again for the helpful info:thumbsup: I have a few partial sheets of rock laying around, as well as a bucket of all-pupose mud. I might try my hand at a few textures this weekend. I'll let you know how I make out. :)
steve

AlbrightPM 12-12-2006 10:36 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by stuccoman (Post 26711)
ABPM ,


Do you have some pictures of what you are trying to match?

I'm not trying to match anything at the moment, What I meant was, down the road, if my textured walls get damaged, I can patch without using a sprayer. I've matched someone else's trowled texture with ease, after I practiced a bit.

steve

Smokey 12-13-2006 11:01 AM

Hey Atlantic, seems you have quite a bit of experience in texturing.
If I want to do knockdown texture, do I simply use mud and add nothing? How can I do it without spraying and just rolling - or is that possible? Do you know of any site where I could learn more about knockdown texturing?

AtlanticWBConst. 12-13-2006 04:17 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Smokey (Post 26793)
Hey Atlantic, seems you have quite a bit of experience in texturing.
If I want to do knockdown texture, do I simply use mud and add nothing? How can I do it without spraying and just rolling - or is that possible? Do you know of any site where I could learn more about knockdown texturing?

First off, I will say this: Like all textures, knockdown is difficult to get just right. It takes ALOT of practice:

You have to spray it on, and yes, you need to add water to the compound to get it to the right consistency. You can either use a texture sprayer with a hopper or a portable air compressor (Like for nail guns) and a spraying mantis with the largest spray hole setting. You can use compound mix with water added to it, or you may be able to find actual ‘knock-down’ mix (Dependant on the part of the country you are in).
Whatever mixture you use or buy, it should be mixed before use and have the consistency of ‘yogurt‘. (If your mix sits for a while, you should re-mix before using it again)

Once you spray it, You need to wipe it down at the right time. You can't wipe it down too early or too long after it's been sprayed on. The tool to 'wipe' it with, is a knockdown knife that is about 2’ wide.
The key is to apply just the right amount of ‘light’ pressure to the knife. As with all drywall taping and texturing, the way to control this is all in your wrist. You have to ‘lock’ your wrist into place as you wipe it.
That keeps the wipe smooth and even.

Try practicing:

1.) Getting the mixture to the right 'consistency'
2.) Gettting your 'spraying' technique right
3.) Getting the knockdown 'wiping' technique smooth
4.) Blending the areas into each other evenly, as you go


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