DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum

DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum (http://www.diychatroom.com/)
-   General DIY Discussions (http://www.diychatroom.com/f2/)
-   -   Dryer vent problem (http://www.diychatroom.com/f2/dryer-vent-problem-67256/)

carguy4sp 03-21-2010 06:17 AM

Dryer vent problem
 
I have several dryer vent problems.
The other day I noticed mold growing above the dryer so I removed a section of drywall to verify no internal leak, none found.

I disconnected the dryer to move it to repair the drywall and a pint of water came out of the vent line. I checked on line and found out that the water condenses in the attic and falls to the bottom of the vent which produces a ton of moisture in our laundry room.

Our electric dryer struggles to dry clothes because the vent is long vertical rise thru to the roof.

My wife was laid off a year ago so money is very tight so please help with ideas that are low cost.

Will insulating the vent in the attic solve the moisture problem?

Is there a low cost way to improve the flow of the dryer vent so our clothes will dry in one cycle instead of three.

Do they make a vent booster that is low in cost but works and not make the system even worse?

Should I put a fan in the laundry room, would it help?

Thanks for your help
Rod and Alica

Just Bill 03-21-2010 06:49 AM

Dryer ducts are limited to 25' total length, each 90deg bend =5', each 45deg bend =2.5'.(IRC M1502) If yours is longer than that, that is much of the problem. The duct must be rigid metal pipe, no flex pipe allowed except at the dryer connection. Ducts in attics or outside walls should be insulated. Has the duct been cleaned out in the last year?? It should be cleaned once a year, at least. Is it possible to run the duct outside from the laundry room, or at least a shorter more direct route??

carguy4sp 03-21-2010 06:57 AM

Thanks Bill
 
I clean the dryer venting system once a year using a leaf blower and a shop vac.

The vents are clean with plenty of venting coming from the vent so I know it is working.

The laundry room is in the center of the house so no I cannot do a new run that would be shorter.

The run is about 22 feet with only one bend.

Thurman 03-21-2010 12:38 PM

"The laundry room is in the center of the house, so no, I cannot do a new run that would be shorter". That said: Consider--could you do a new run using the same materials you have, not any longer, with the new run being horizontal? This would eliminate the dryer pushing the air up. Air blown horizontally moves easier than being forced up. You didn't say which floor the dryer is on. If it is over a crawl space, you could go through the floor, via the crawl space to the outside. If over a basement, practically the same method with the vent pipe being visible in the basement. IF you really have that much moisture collecting in the dryer venting, bottom line---put a drain at the lowest point so the water can drain out--somewhere. So many solutions using the same materials with your labor. Good Luck, David

Gary in WA 03-21-2010 02:38 PM

"I clean the dryer venting system once a year using a leaf blower and a shop vac." ---- that is a little better than doing nothing at all. Dryer lint is wet, mixed with hot air as it exits the dryer. The first cold surface the air touches causes condensation on said surface with stuck on lint. To properly remove the lint from the ducting, you NEED a duct brush- 4", with a vacuum or blower. The ducting should be vapor barrier wrapped and insulated to prevent such condensation when it travels through a unheated space. The duct seams should be foil-taped as well as all individual joints in the elbows.

David: "IF you really have that much moisture collecting in the dryer venting, bottom line---put a drain at the lowest point so the water can drain out--somewhere."--------- the drain would need to be a sealed trap door with proper directional joints so as not to cause any turbulence or air leakage in the ducting while running. Good idea, possibly hard to implement.
Some tips: http://www.hcpdc.com/pdf/Dryer%20Ven...quirements.pdf
http://www.ashireporter.org/articles...es.aspx?id=161


http://docs.google.com/viewer?a=v&q=...up65cYgFwMvULw

Be safe,
Gary

Thurman 03-21-2010 09:36 PM

Gary-sometimes the thought/picture in my head just doesn't come out in the typed words. I'm thinking/seeing a small, 3/8" maybe, tube coming from the area of the dryer vent where any condensation may be collecting. This would only be to facilitate drainage to prevent the water from collecting and standing. There are so many other problems with the original system this is really a moot point. David

fetzer85 03-21-2010 11:18 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Thurman (Post 417588)
You didn't say which floor the dryer is on. If it is over a crawl space, you could go through the floor, via the crawl space to the outside. If over a basement, practically the same method with the vent pipe being visible in the basement.

I agree 100% - as long as the dryer isn't on the 2nd floor (or higher?) then it should be a relatively easy thing to do. It's a shame these architects don't think about things like this.

The house I'm in right now originally had a setup for the washer & dryer in the basement. The dryer vent had a 90 degree to go up, then about 7ft of vertical run, then a 90 degree out the basement wall. This is pretty common and worked fine. Now that it's up on the 1st floor and I literally have a straight pipe with no bends thats less then 2ft long, our dryer is a beast! You can throw anything in there - queen size comforters, huge loads of towels, etc. and they're always dry by the end of the cycle.

To the average homeowner I think this would be a very admirable feature of a house and wanted by almost anyone!

Alto 11-29-2010 08:26 AM

consider a dehumidifier. I keep one in my basement even without my laundry room there and i keep another one running in my house. the one in the basement is conntected to a hose which leads out of the house and it runs all the time for part of the day; I do not have to empty it. I have another one that I empty that is inside my living quarters. Since they turn off when the correct humidity is reached my electric bill is not too affected by them. In your case, the dehumidifier might only run when the dryer is running. I am able to find these dehumidifers in my local thrift store frequently and do not cost too much.


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 05:03 AM.


Copyright 2003-2014 Escalate Media LP. All Rights Reserved