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-   -   Draining a Waterbed (http://www.diychatroom.com/f2/draining-waterbed-12297/)

Keyo77 10-11-2007 08:46 AM

Draining a Waterbed
 
I know this isn't exactly a home improvement question, but does anyone have any tips for draining a waterbed in the basement? I tried using the drain kit that attaches to the sink but after running the sink full blast for over an hour, the water level in the bed barely moved. I really do not want to run my water bill sky-high by leaving it on the many hours I suspect this method will require. I thought about running the hose to the drain in the laundry room but the drain cover is cemented to the floor and cannot be removed. We are moving and I've GOT to get this bed out. Any ideas that don't require me to buy the electric pump?

NateHanson 10-11-2007 09:11 AM

If you run the hose outside, is there somewhere nearby outside that is BELOW the level of the bed? If you can get the hose to a point lower than the bed, even if it has to go up to get there, then you can use a shopvac to start a siphon, and the rest will drain by itself.

You could speed up the faucet attachment method if you put heavy things on the bed. Also, I doubt the water bill increase would ever add up to more than buying an electric water pump, so if you can't siphon or drain it anywhere, I'd just run that faucet.

Keyo77 10-11-2007 10:22 AM

I thought about the outside option but there isn't any place outside that is lower than the bed. I could run the hose to the floor drain if I could just get that cover off but it is cemented in. Do you think it would work if I ran the hose up over something (to get gravity going) then down into a toilet? The toilet is on the same level as the bed. I could live with the water bill cost but after more than an hour, I saw almost no change in the water level of the bed. At that rate, I'd be running the faucet for 6-8 hours, which I know would be more than the cost of a pump. And I did have heavy things on the bed. I wonder if I could rent a pump. It's either that or somehow pry that cover off the floor drain.

redline 10-11-2007 12:20 PM

Does this basement have a sump pump?

Keyo77 10-11-2007 12:28 PM

'Fraid not.

redline 10-11-2007 12:31 PM

Does rain water get into the basement?

steve1234 10-11-2007 12:34 PM

Just a thought...........

Do you know anybody that wakeboards? Most of the aftermarket ballast bags that are added to boats to make the wake bigger use a connection that is the same as a waterbed. Small portable pumps are used to fill and empty the bags. They run off 12vdc, and they can move a lot of water quickly. If you could find one to borrow, it wouldn't take any time at all to empty a bed.

If you had to buy one........I recently bought one that was $99 but it was a very high capacity. I'd guess you could find one for around $60. You would need a 12vdc source in the basement, but in a pinch you could use a car battery.

Keyo77 10-11-2007 02:27 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by redline (Post 67584)
Does rain water get into the basement?


Fortunately, no. This is a newer condo so moisture hasn't been a problem so far.

Keyo77 10-11-2007 02:29 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by steve1234 (Post 67586)
Just a thought...........

Do you know anybody that wakeboards? Most of the aftermarket ballast bags that are added to boats to make the wake bigger use a connection that is the same as a waterbed. Small portable pumps are used to fill and empty the bags. They run off 12vdc, and they can move a lot of water quickly. If you could find one to borrow, it wouldn't take any time at all to empty a bed.

If you had to buy one........I recently bought one that was $99 but it was a very high capacity. I'd guess you could find one for around $60. You would need a 12vdc source in the basement, but in a pinch you could use a car battery.


I've tried to find someplace to rent a pump but so far no luck. I really don't want to have to buy one since the cheapest one I found is $121. I won't need it in the future because I'm giving away the waterbed. I'm going to try the gravity method with a shorter hose and someone holding the end over the floor drain. It'll be a pain but may be my only option, short of buying a pump.

NateHanson 10-11-2007 02:37 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Keyo77 (Post 67563)
Do you think it would work if I ran the hose up over something (to get gravity going) then down into a toilet? The toilet is on the same level as the bed.

No. That won't work. Water will only flow (siphon or no siphon) from a higher level to a lower level. Making the water go up first will not then make it go down faster. If the water in the toilet is lower than the water in the bed, it will flow. If it's the same or higher, there will be no flow.

Quote:

I could live with the water bill cost but after more than an hour, I saw almost no change in the water level of the bed. At that rate, I'd be running the faucet for 6-8 hours, which I know would be more than the cost of a pump. And I did have heavy things on the bed. I wonder if I could rent a pump. It's either that or somehow pry that cover off the floor drain.
My tenants filled a 2 thousand gallon pool (without my permission). The increase in my water bill was about $20. They ran the hose for two days.

Unless you live in the desert, and your water is flown in on a Leer jet from a French spring, there's no way that running your faucet for 8 hours will cost $100, or even $10.

NateHanson 10-11-2007 02:40 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Keyo77 (Post 67599)
I've tried to find someplace to rent a pump but so far no luck. I really don't want to have to buy one since the cheapest one I found is $121.

Just rent a sump pump from Home Depot. Let the bed drain into a bucket next to the bed, and have the pump in the bucket pumping the water up and out the window, or into the sink, or whatever.

Is the cemented floor drain a grate? Or it's a solid cover?

If it's a grate, and you just don't want to stand there with a hose for an hour while it drains, just get a cinderblock and use it to hold the hose over the grate.

redline 10-11-2007 02:42 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Keyo77 (Post 67599)
I'm going to try the gravity method with a shorter hose and someone holding the end over the floor drain.

I believe that they sell small pumps (under $10) that you connect to a drill. I have not used them so cannot comment how well they work. Do you have a cordless drill?

If you use a corded drill with this pump then be very safe as electicity and water do not mix well.

If you use the gravity method then have your kids lay on the bed to speed up the process.

Or try a sump pump. A cheap one should sell for around $30 to $40.

redline 10-11-2007 02:47 PM

So wet vacs have an outlet to use a garden hose on for expelling water.

Keyo77 10-12-2007 01:06 AM

Nate, how would I get the water from the bed into the bucket?? The cinder block is a good idea though.

Redline, I've never heard of a pump that connects to a drill but I'll look into it. The wet vac idea is a good one too! I'd rather spend the $$ on a wet vac I'll use again.


Thanks guys!:)

NateHanson 10-12-2007 04:40 AM

Is the waterbed on a stand, or is the water resting right on the floor?

I was assuming it's on a stand about a foot off the ground. In that case, you'd stick a drain hose in a bucket, and the water would go in there.

I'm either misunderstanding your question, or the situation.


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