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Old 03-28-2014, 04:25 PM   #1
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Drafty electrical outlets and switches


Is spray foam a good solution for this problem? I can see the vapor barrier has been cut behind the boxes

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Old 03-28-2014, 04:36 PM   #2
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Have you considered first trying something along these lines?

http://www.homedepot.com/p/Frost-Kin...S12H/100184290

Cheers, Chris

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Old 03-28-2014, 05:48 PM   #3
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Spray foam (such as great stuff in a can) is flammable. I would not use it anywhere that it might close an opening in the box or enter the box.
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Old 03-28-2014, 07:24 PM   #4
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Sounds like someone has not air sealed the places in the crawl space, basement, attic where the wires where run though the plates.
Not sure where Oso's getting that info but walls acting chimneys is a far bigger danger.
No air flow no fire.
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Old 03-28-2014, 07:59 PM   #5
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Foam around the boxes with DAP foam in the can, along with a small squirt where the wires enter the box. Just do not fill the box all of the way with foam, like some people do.

Also make sure you foam around the Windows & doors, behind the molding around them.
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Old 03-28-2014, 08:40 PM   #6
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Baby safety plugs ..works great..
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Old 03-28-2014, 09:17 PM   #7
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To clarify, electrical boxes have openings. And wires run through some of same, but the others still have gaps around them to make it easy to punch them out. In the house I am currently working on, we hit the unused openings with silicone caulk, thine same around the wires for the used endings. Plastiic vapor barrier was then silicones to the sides of the box prior to sheetrock....and then the ending was sealed after plaster. This has NOTHING to do with places where wires run through plates, etc.....since time walls are cold on the outside......and the house is warm....and there will be some air transfer between the two temps regardless. That said, your house is of tight and you run into moisture problems and have to run an exhaust fan in the bath or whatever for various times during the day. Ron
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Old 03-28-2014, 09:40 PM   #8
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The baby plugs cost a few dollars. Put your hand in front of the outlet and you will see that the draft has stopped
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Old 03-28-2014, 10:45 PM   #9
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The baby plugs don't solve the real problem though, they just take away a symptom. As joecaption said, fill the holes where the wires go through the top and bottom plates and you won't have air movement through the wall to create the drafts. That's more inefficient than drafty receptacles. If you can get around the boxes with spray foam, then that's great but you should be looking elsewhere first.
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Old 03-29-2014, 12:37 AM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Oso954 View Post
Spray foam (such as great stuff in a can) is flammable. I would not use it anywhere that it might close an opening in the box or enter the box.
Not even the fireblock foam, which comes in the orange can? http://www.homedepot.com/p/GREAT-STU...5372/202023037
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Old 03-29-2014, 02:14 AM   #11
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6. Cured foam is combustible and will burn if exposed
to temperatures above 240F (116C). Do not
apply GREAT STUFF™ foam around heaters, high heat lamps or recessed lighting fixtures, radiators,furnaces or fi replaces where it could contact heat-conducting surfaces. Do not use GREAT STUFF foam inside electrical boxes or panels (applications around the boxes are permitted)

http://greatstuff.dow.com/pdfs/consumer_safety.pdf

It is Item 6 on Page 2 of the Dow Chemical Consumer Safety Sheet.
I don't have a problem using it to seal a studbay, but the op was talking about using it directly behind the box to seal a vapor barrier. Depending on the spacing it could be a problem. If an arc or molten slag from an arc could possibly hit it, I don't want it there.

Last edited by Oso954; 03-29-2014 at 02:46 AM.
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Old 03-29-2014, 02:41 AM   #12
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If you want something that will not support combustion look for something that says "firestop" or "fire barrier". 3M firestop products would be an example.

If it says "fire block" the product will often support combustion.

Greg: I haven't found any specific statements from DAP, but I can tell you that in my on tests on it, once ignited, it supports combustion better than Great Stuff.

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