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Old 05-15-2010, 11:12 PM   #121
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DIY Tips and Tricks!


Here is my tip:

Setting down electric radiant heat mat with hot melt glue? Here's you you can get it nearly FLAT to the surface.

Buy two silicone baking mats (it goes under cookies and other doughs in metal baking pans). Silicone is high temp resistant, and also a non-stick surface.

Layout your radiant heat mat on the ground as normal. Overtop that, lay down a generous amount of hot melt glue, especial to the areas sticking up. Roll up the silicone baking mat into a 2" tube, and press the electric mat and glue down together onto your surface. Count to 20 and pull the silicone mat up, it will have a bunch of glue stuck to it. Set it aside for a moment. Repeat in another area with the other mat, set it aside. By now the glue will have cooled enough on the first mat so that it slide right off.

Flat mat, clean work tools, no burnt hands. After I did mine, I only had to pour a 1/4" layer of Self Leveling Compound, and nothing was peaking obove the surface!

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Old 05-16-2010, 01:20 AM   #122
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gma2rjc View Post
If you have a problem with the water evaporating from the trap in a seldom-used drain, causing the room to smell bad, pour some water in the drain and add a few drops of mineral oil (baby oil). The oil will spread out and create a film over the water. The water won't evaporate as quickly.
You can use corn oil instead of mineral oil for this but you have to remove the hidden test tubes first.
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Old 05-16-2010, 03:03 AM   #123
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Originally Posted by thekctermite View Post
Sorry to be a funsucker on this thread but...
That may be a DIYer tip, but it sure itsn't a good idea.

This method adds an unnecessary connection and involves using pigtail wiring from the previous fixture to connect to the new fixture's pigtail wiring. It also puts faith in the connection made by the person that installed the last fixture, and the pigtail size of the old may be smaller than that of the new. I have never seen a professional electrician do that on any sort of retrofit electrical work, and I'd never consider doing that myself. Hardened insulation on household wiring will strip off enough to facilitate proper installation of the new fixture's pigtail in a wire nut.

And you are only allowed to make a certain number of connections in a box, before adding an extension.
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Old 08-18-2010, 10:40 AM   #124
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While putting in my 14' 2"x12" floor joists, (by myself) I found it to be much easier to slip the boards into the hangers by tapping the tops out a bit to allow easy sliding.
Tap them back to the wood when done!

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Old 08-18-2010, 11:14 AM   #125
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Originally Posted by Willie T View Post
Doing some measuring and marking on painted walls? No matter how small you make that pencil tic, it still sticks out like a sore thumb.

Just put a small strip of that blue painter's tape on the wall first, and restrict your marking to the tape.
Excellent tip, I do this often.

Also, I use the 1 1/2" tape because it's the same thickness of the stud so when I have to mark studs out I just put the tape over it so I can see the full dimension of the stud. This helps when drilling into a stud for things like lag bolts (handing a flat panel TV for example). Using the tape to mark out the exact thickness of the stud lets you see where the meat is.
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Old 08-18-2010, 11:19 AM   #126
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And you are only allowed to make a certain number of connections in a box, before adding an extension.
Can you cite that code article please?
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Old 08-18-2010, 03:33 PM   #127
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DangerMouse View Post
While putting in my 14' 2"x12" floor joists, (by myself) I found it to be much easier to slip the boards into the hangers by tapping the tops out a bit to allow easy sliding.
Tap them back to the wood when done!

DM
When I was the one putting on the hangers, I'd use a guage the same thickness as the joist and still leave around a 1/16th or 1/8th gap. It helps when you're rolling joists by yourself. Beat em back tight when you're putting in the side nails.

This may be an oldie but, whether it be a whollered(sp?)out door hinge screw hole or door latch where the screw just won't hold any more.
Take the screw out and beat a golf tee in the hole with some wood glue on it. Saw it flush and put the screw back in.
Another one about finding dead center. Hold one end of the tape at the edge and pivot the other end to any whole number...... say 6". Half of 6 is three, mark the 3" and it's dead center.
It's actually easier to do than explain.
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Old 08-18-2010, 09:14 PM   #128
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tizzer View Post
When I was the one putting on the hangers, I'd use a guage the same thickness as the joist and still leave around a 1/16th or 1/8th gap. It helps when you're rolling joists by yourself. Beat em back tight when you're putting in the side nails.

This may be an oldie but, whether it be a whollered(sp?)out door hinge screw hole or door latch where the screw just won't hold any more.
Take the screw out and beat a golf tee in the hole with some wood glue on it. Saw it flush and put the screw back in.
Another one about finding dead center. Hold one end of the tape at the edge and pivot the other end to any whole number...... say 6". Half of 6 is three, mark the 3" and it's dead center.
It's actually easier to do than explain.
Hold the same 6" on the opposite edge and mark the 2" and the 4" for thirds........ or use any division points you choose such as marking every inch for sixths, or each half inch for 12ths.

(Yeah, both that trick and the golf "T" one have been mentioned here somewhere. Sorry.)
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Old 08-19-2010, 02:06 AM   #129
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I don't golf - but I cook. Bamboo skewers and toothpicks are also acceptable substitutes.


Seriously, who has golf tees sitting around the house?
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Old 08-19-2010, 02:08 AM   #130
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To fasten wood or even cabinets to a concrete or block wall without using concrete screws. Drill a hole through the wood or cabinet back and the concrete or block just about 1/16 larger than the size of the drywall screw or deck screw you wish to use as the fastener. Cut off a length of romex (12) about 1/2 inch longer than the screw, separate the three wires. Insert one strand of the romex with the insulation left on the wire into the hole you drilled leaving about 1/2 inch sticking out of the hole. Bend the wire against the wood or cabinet back and screw the screw in. Break the wire off and there you go.
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Old 08-19-2010, 02:42 AM   #131
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You might want to replace ROMEX with INSULATED WIRE, which would include both a single strand of a romex encased wire or a single strand of THHN wire.

The way you wrote your post, it sounds like you want to stick a whole piece of 12/2 ROMEX into a 3/16" hole for a 1/8" screw!
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Old 08-19-2010, 09:10 AM   #132
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jiju1943 View Post
To fasten wood or even cabinets to a concrete or block wall without using concrete screws. Drill a hole through the wood or cabinet back and the concrete or block just about 1/16 larger than the size of the drywall screw or deck screw you wish to use as the fastener. Cut off a length of romex (12) about 1/2 inch longer than the screw, separate the three wires. Insert one strand of the romex with the insulation left on the wire into the hole you drilled leaving about 1/2 inch sticking out of the hole. Bend the wire against the wood or cabinet back and screw the screw in. Break the wire off and there you go.
I think he covered that.
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Old 08-19-2010, 10:16 AM   #133
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Quote:
Originally Posted by xxPaulCPxx View Post
You might want to replace ROMEX with INSULATED WIRE, which would include both a single strand of a romex encased wire or a single strand of THHN wire.

The way you wrote your post, it sounds like you want to stick a whole piece of 12/2 ROMEX into a 3/16" hole for a 1/8" screw!
Sorry buddy, I am not really good at explaining things sometimes, ole timers you know.
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Old 08-19-2010, 03:04 PM   #134
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love this thread.

These are probably known by everyone but I thought I would share.

If you ever have a wood screw that just won't bite in the wood anymore, then remove the screw and take a piece of wood that is tapered and tap it into the hole. When it won't go anymore, cut it off with a utility knife. Now you have good wood for your screw to bite into. I've used this on door hardware many times.

Speaking of doors, if you have a door that wont stay opened or closed then remove one of the hinge pins. Put it a vise with about 50% of the pin above the jaws. Tap it slightly with a hammer. This will put a little curve in it. Now re install it in the hinge. The door should now stay opened or closed.

I needed to install several ceiling fans but wasn't sure how to get them in the center of the room. I used some fishing line and 4 small finish nails. Tie the fishing line to one nail and tap it into the corner of the ceiling. Then drag the line to the opposite corner. tap another nail there and tie the fishing line tight. Repeat for the other 2 corners. What you made is a X on the ceiling. Where the 2 lines intersect is the center.
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Old 11-29-2010, 11:25 AM   #135
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If you're an airhead like me that puts down his drywall tools and forgets them so they rust, maybe you want to do what I did and spray clear varnish on the blades. It seems to be working, (no rust) and the varnish doesn't seem to bother my work.

DM

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