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Old 09-08-2014, 04:18 PM   #31
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Another tip, do not use silicone sealant on any PVC pipe, at some point down the road it will just snap in half with no warning. One of my boats almost sunk because of that.

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Old 09-08-2014, 05:34 PM   #32
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Quote:
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Another tip, do not use silicone sealant on any PVC pipe, at some point down the road it will just snap in half with no warning. One of my boats almost sunk because of that.
Can you elaborate on this?

I have a 3000 gallon rain water capture system I set up and when I was building it, I wasn't quite sure if I was going to need to make changes so I used clear 100% silicone caulk as one would use PVC glue to assemble the 4 inch pvc pipes. (I did put small screws through the joint where pipe and fittings intersect for a mechanical hold)

There's nothing pressurized.. I wouldn't have trusted an untested method that way.. but some gravity drains are done with silicone. Some of them are even vertical and seem to be just fine on their second year.

Any thoughts? (no pun intended there bud! LOL)
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Old 09-10-2014, 06:19 PM   #33
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Our refrigerator/freezer has the freezer above the frig. The freezer section was operating correctly, but the frig not getting to 40 degrees or lower. After clearing out the frig it was soon discovered that the cold air in the freezer naturally falls down thru a vent which cools the frig. Used a air dryer to melt the ice in the vent. Problem solved. If you're about to junk something, nothing to lose by tinkering with it...my diy'er advice
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Old 09-10-2014, 08:28 PM   #34
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PaulBob View Post
Can you elaborate on this?

I have a 3000 gallon rain water capture system I set up and when I was building it, I wasn't quite sure if I was going to need to make changes so I used clear 100% silicone caulk as one would use PVC glue to assemble the 4 inch pvc pipes. (I did put small screws through the joint where pipe and fittings intersect for a mechanical hold)

There's nothing pressurized.. I wouldn't have trusted an untested method that way.. but some gravity drains are done with silicone. Some of them are even vertical and seem to be just fine on their second year.

Any thoughts? (no pun intended there bud! LOL)
I wish I had something concrete to give you on this but I don't. I did a search and I am finding nothing so maybe I am wrong about this. I based my statement above on the fact that two different times I had a PVC pipe just snap for no reason, right where the pipe was sealed with silicone sealant. Also a good friend of mine who was a marine mechanic told me to never use silicone on PVC for that reason.

I really do hope I am wrong, that would be bad to have all your water drain out with no back up. I will do some more checking and if I do find something I will make another post.
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Old 09-11-2014, 10:57 AM   #35
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Installing stair rail fittings: When installing a fitting to the rail, cut a 1/4-3/8 inch slice of the rail off and use it to mark where you need to drill the holes for the rail bolts. Drive a 6d finish or trim nail, through the 1/4 inch piece at the center of the pilot hole location. Using a pair of dykes or side cutters, cut the nail at an angle leaving about a good heavy 1/8 -5/32 inches long sticking out both sides of the 1/4-3/8 inch profile.

Drive two additional nails one at the top and bottom of the profile on each side of the pilot hole nail. Cut each of those nails like the first one. The nail at the pilot is to mark the location of the pilot holes for the bolt, the other two are to locate where to drive 6d nails into the end of the fitting and cut them like on the profile piece and leave them there.

The reason for the two short nails left in the end of the fitting is this: when bolting the fitting to the rail, it will sometimes slide due to the glue being slick and make it hard to align the profiles of the fitting to the profile of the rail. With the cut off nails in the end, there is an indention on one where the short nail of the other will fit into and keep the fitting from moving while tightening the bolt. Worked for me, hopefully I explained this where it is understandable.
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Old 09-11-2014, 11:11 AM   #36
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Jim -- I use your idea for alignment on any glue ups that are critical and may have a tendency to squirm. Steel brads for alignment pins on most but if it may be something that someone may need to re-saw some day I use brass brads for pins to preserve a carbide blade.

I find it quicker and more accurate than biscuits and for certain better than dowels.

thanks for the reminder
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Old 09-11-2014, 11:20 AM   #37
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When using easy anchors for drywall I find it is better to drill a small 1/8" pilot hole first even though the directions say no pre drilling . Without the pilot hole the tip sometimes breaks or the fastener does not seem to twist into the drywall cleanly.
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Old 09-11-2014, 11:22 AM   #38
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Fairview View Post
Jim -- I use your idea for alignment on any glue ups that are critical and may have a tendency to squirm. Steel brads for alignment pins on most but if it may be something that someone may need to re-saw some day I use brass brads for pins to preserve a carbide blade.

I find it quicker and more accurate than biscuits and for certain better than dowels.

thanks for the reminder
That is a good thought for other applications, I hadn't thought about doing that but I can see where it would be a good idea.
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Old 09-16-2014, 11:00 AM   #39
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Today I leant the easiest way create your own indoor waterfall.
Tips is simple: Begin by creating a frame this can be made with 2x4 wood studs. This can be finished with moisture proof material. Now, burry the pump well below the surface and cover it up with rocks (faux rocks). There you have a natural waterfall ready for the indoors.
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Old 09-19-2014, 03:35 AM   #40
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I never knew I could learn so much about proper handling and storage of my tools and equipment here as well as all the countless advice from everyone else. Thanks for sharing everyone!
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Old 09-19-2014, 06:03 AM   #41
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Quote:
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You can clean copper with just a bit of ketchup and (I prefer) a green scrub sponge, the thin flat kind. the acid in the ketchup will cut right through all that green crud and make your copper shine like new. Your cat will love it too.

I tried this on the cat with poor results. He freaked out.
Not sure if it was the ketchup or the scrub sponge....
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Old 10-12-2014, 09:35 PM   #42
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Great tips , thanks for sharing
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Old 10-19-2014, 05:32 PM   #43
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Is Your Outdoor Faucet Giving You Grief?
http://youtu.be/RFVSR-7GfkU

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Old 10-20-2014, 01:29 AM   #44
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Found this on This Old House and I think this is really a great saving tip!

Quote:
"Wait to replace your grill, lawn mower, or patio furniture until the fall, when stores mark down their inventory to make room for holiday decorations and snowblowers.
Cost: Making do with what you have this summer.
Savings: $150 or more per item.
Bonus: Retailers—especially online ones, such as Target—often provide free shipping on leftover warm-weather gear.
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Old 11-12-2014, 12:37 PM   #45
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I am new member here still explore all there is here. btw agree same cricket Let's learn together



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