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Old 06-09-2008, 09:52 PM   #1
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Deck Building Project Pictures (and Some Questions)


I'll use this tread to post some pictures of the deck I'm building as it has progressed over the last few weekends. Here are some pictures showing the ledger board attached to the house. We used 3/8" carriage bolts at 16" OC. I had to attach the left outside joist to the ledger board before mounting to the wall because it was situated on an inside corner.

Here are the pictures:
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Old 06-09-2008, 09:59 PM   #2
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Deck Building Project Pictures (and Some Questions)


Here are some pictures of the holes. I posted a thread on this forum about some issues I had using the power auger. Basically, we ended up digging most of the holes manually and I was pleasantly surprised by how much easier it was than using the power auger.

I used strings laid out on the ground to help center the holes and keep them in line. As you can see from the pictures, there are going to be two beams running parallel to the house. Two of the posts supporting the beam closed to the house will be mounted to the existing slab.
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Old 06-09-2008, 10:06 PM   #3
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Deck Building Project Pictures (and Some Questions)


The next step was to backfill the holes, remove all the extra dirt, and pour the concrete. I borrowed a power mixer from a friend, which made it a lot easier. I still ended up shoveling the concrete out of the mixer though because I couldn't get it to pour properly into the holes. I tried to keep it as dry as possible.

I used j-bolts sunken into the wet concrete. I then used a plumb bob to make sure the j-bolt was centered on the foundation.
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Old 06-09-2008, 10:11 PM   #4
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Deck Building Project Pictures (and Some Questions)


Next, I attached the post anchors to the j-bolts and mounted the posts. To align the post anchors along where the beams will run, I used a laser level that projects a straight line. I situated the laser level on top of the outside joist and shot a line down the center of foundations. I then measured the center of each post anchor and situated it so that the line from the laser level intersected the center of each post anchor. It worked pretty well.


Edit: In the third picture, you can see the foundation that will support the 6x6. I'm using a 6x6 here because I'll have two beams intersecting at a 45 degree angle. Directly above this location will be where the stairs come down.
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Old 06-09-2008, 10:22 PM   #5
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Deck Building Project Pictures (and Some Questions)


Finally, I cut the posts to the proper hight and installed the beams. I finished the beam closest to the house. On the outside beam, I needed to get a 6x6 before I could finish the beam so I cut some of the boards to length but I didn't finish assembling the beam.

This weekend I plan on installing the 6x6 post and finishing the outside beam. Then I'll cut the last post and install the last beam, which will be situated at a 45 degree angle to the outside beam. Once that's done I'll start installing the joists.

It's nice to be far enough along to where you can actually begin to see the deck take shape. I'll post more pictures when I finish the beams and begin installing the joists.

Edit: The last picture looks strange because it got screwed up during the batch resize. It was originally a portrait-oriented picture but was converted to a landscape format, which I guess distorted it.
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Old 06-09-2008, 10:26 PM   #6
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Deck Building Project Pictures (and Some Questions)


Here's my question:

In some spots, the beam closest to the house is a tad bit (1/6" to 1/8") too high. Can I just use a belt sander and take a little off the top of the beam? I'm worried because I'm using pressure treated wood and I don't want to screw up the pressure treatment but it will only be 1/8" at the most so I don't think it will cause a problem. What does everyone think? If I shouldn't sand, what should I do?? Thanks,

Kevin
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Old 06-09-2008, 11:08 PM   #7
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Nice pictures showing your project's progress! Looks good so far.

You could sand the high spot of the beam if you need to. People say don't sand treated treated lumber, but I say pooey. Don't eat the dust or the chips and you won't suffer any ill effects. The material is treated to retention, so it goes down through the thickness of the wood. It won't hurt it to knock an edge off.

A hand plane would work well for this if you have one. Another option would be to mark your joist layout on the beam and just use a chisel to remove 1/8" off the top only where you need to.
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Old 06-10-2008, 06:19 AM   #8
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Deck Building Project Pictures (and Some Questions)


It looks well planned and laid out. However, I have a couple of initial observations & concerns:

1.) You have a post near the corner of the house attached to the concrete pad. How thick is that pad? If it is not the required thickness for a pier footing in your region, then you would need to add one under it (cut out a 12" x 12" square of the pad, dig down, add sono tub, etc, etc...)
2.) FWIW: You actually could have gotten away with a single row of pier footings and a cantilevered deck frame.
3.) Pre-Attached Joist Hangers: We usually attach the joists first, then add the joist hangers after. The reason is because not every pressure treated joists is going to be the same width dimensions. That means that some can be wider than others, by as much as 1/4". If you attach the joist hangers first, an then add the joist hangers after, you are going to run into some of them not being at the same height as others. By installing them, and then adding the joist hangers after, you can adjust the height of each, to create a unified level layout.
4.) Remember that you will also need a concrete landing pad, or footing arrangment for your stair stringers leading from the deck, to grade level.
5.) Your choice of flashing looks good, however, it appears to be aluminum. If it is, I'd have to mention that aluminum is not recommended as a flashing for Pressure Treated Deck Ledgers:

http://www.woodpreservation.ca/index...d=17&Itemid=26
"Do not use pressure treated wood in direct contact with aluminum – When using pressure treated wood in close proximity to aluminum products, such as aluminum siding, flashing, and door and window frames, a 1/4" minimum space must be allowed for between the pressure treated wood and the aluminum products. Polyethylene or nylon spacers can be used to maintain the 1/4" spacing."

http://www.canada.com/ottawacitizen/...1-97cf362d841d
"Aluminum flashing is another area you need to consider when using pressure-treated wood. Aluminum is especially vulnerable to corrosion when in contact with copper-rich lumber. That's why it's essential to use copper flashing anywhere near pressure-treated wood."
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Last edited by AtlanticWBConst.; 06-10-2008 at 01:41 PM. Reason: spelling
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Old 06-10-2008, 07:28 AM   #9
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Deck Building Project Pictures (and Some Questions)


Looking good. I have a recommendation. The ground looks like it is very close to the left side of the basement window frame. Before you put on the deck boards, make sure you have enough clearance. Make sure it is properly graded. It would be a real PITA to have to fix that while prone under the deck.
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Old 06-10-2008, 03:36 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AtlanticWBConst. View Post
1.) You have a post near the corner of the house attached to the concrete pad. How thick is that pad? If it is not the required thickness for a pier footing in your region, then you would need to add one under it (cut out a 12" x 12" square of the pad, dig down, add sono tub, etc, etc...)
The pad is 6" thick. I indicated this on the plans and the inspector didn't say anything so I'm assuming it will be ok. I also checked with an engineer who said that it would be fine because the pad displaces so much surface area.

Quote:
Originally Posted by AtlanticWBConst. View Post
2.) FWIW: You actually could have gotten away with a single row of pier footings and a cantilevered deck frame.
Yeah, I've had a couple of people mention that to me but I figure it's better to over-build than try to cut corners. Plus, the deck will be over 400 sqft so it will accommodate a lot of people and I don't want to take any chances.

Quote:
Originally Posted by AtlanticWBConst. View Post
3.) Pre-Attached Joist Hangers: We usually attach the joists first, then add the joist hangers after. The reason is because not every pressure treated joists is going to be the same width dimensions. That means that some can be wider than others, by as much as 1/4". If you attach the joist hangers first, an then add the joist hangers after, you are going to run into some of them not being at the same height as others. By installing them, and then adding the joist hangers after, you can adjust the height of each,
to create a unified level layout.
Good point. I'll probably run into a problem with this because there is a noticeable difference between the width of the 16' boards (7 1/4") and the 12' boards (7 1/2"). I need to use 16' board for the middle section to accommodate a "stick-out" that will extend out an additional 2' and be 10' wide. I guess I'll have to remove a couple of the joist hangers and rehang them??

Quote:
Originally Posted by AtlanticWBConst. View Post
4.) Remember that you will also need a concrete landing pad, or footing arrangment for your stair stringers leading from the deck, to grade level.
Yes, I haven't planned that out yet but I'm aware that it will be needed. Basically, I just wanted to get the deck done and then plan the stairs from there. Hopefully it wont' be too complicated.

Quote:
Originally Posted by AtlanticWBConst. View Post
5.) Your choice of flashing looks good, however, it appears to be aluminum. If it is, I'd have to mention that aluminum is not recommended as a flashing for Pressure Treated Deck Ledgers:

http://www.woodpreservation.ca/index...d=17&Itemid=26
"Do not use pressure treated wood in direct contact with aluminum When using pressure treated wood in close proximity to aluminum products, such as aluminum siding, flashing, and door and window frames, a 1/4" minimum space must be allowed for between the pressure treated wood and the aluminum products. Polyethylene or nylon spacers can be used to maintain the 1/4" spacing."

http://www.canada.com/ottawacitizen/...1-97cf362d841d
"Aluminum flashing is another area you need to consider when using pressure-treated wood. Aluminum is especially vulnerable to corrosion when in contact with copper-rich lumber. That's why it's essential to use copper flashing anywhere near pressure-treated wood."
It's actually vinyl flashing. I came across that issue in doing some research prior to building, but thanks for the heads-up.
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Old 06-10-2008, 03:37 PM   #11
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Deck Building Project Pictures (and Some Questions)


Quote:
Originally Posted by AtlanticWBConst. View Post
It looks well planned and laid out. However, I have a couple of initial observations & concerns:

1.) You have a post near the corner of the house attached to the concrete pad. How thick is that pad? If it is not the required thickness for a pier footing in your region, then you would need to add one under it (cut out a 12" x 12" square of the pad, dig down, add sono tub, etc, etc...)
2.) FWIW: You actually could have gotten away with a single row of pier footings and a cantilevered deck frame.
3.) Pre-Attached Joist Hangers: We usually attach the joists first, then add the joist hangers after. The reason is because not every pressure treated joists is going to be the same width dimensions. That means that some can be wider than others, by as much as 1/4". If you attach the joist hangers first, an then add the joist hangers after, you are going to run into some of them not being at the same height as others. By installing them, and then adding the joist hangers after, you can adjust the height of each, to create a unified level layout.
4.) Remember that you will also need a concrete landing pad, or footing arrangment for your stair stringers leading from the deck, to grade level.
5.) Your choice of flashing looks good, however, it appears to be aluminum. If it is, I'd have to mention that aluminum is not recommended as a flashing for Pressure Treated Deck Ledgers:

http://www.woodpreservation.ca/index...d=17&Itemid=26
"Do not use pressure treated wood in direct contact with aluminum When using pressure treated wood in close proximity to aluminum products, such as aluminum siding, flashing, and door and window frames, a 1/4" minimum space must be allowed for between the pressure treated wood and the aluminum products. Polyethylene or nylon spacers can be used to maintain the 1/4" spacing."

http://www.canada.com/ottawacitizen/...1-97cf362d841d
"Aluminum flashing is another area you need to consider when using pressure-treated wood. Aluminum is especially vulnerable to corrosion when in contact with copper-rich lumber. That's why it's essential to use copper flashing anywhere near pressure-treated wood."
Quote:
Originally Posted by thekctermite View Post
Nice pictures showing your project's progress! Looks good so far.

You could sand the high spot of the beam if you need to. People say don't sand treated treated lumber, but I say pooey. Don't eat the dust or the chips and you won't suffer any ill effects. The material is treated to retention, so it goes down through the thickness of the wood. It won't hurt it to knock an edge off.

A hand plane would work well for this if you have one. Another option would be to mark your joist layout on the beam and just use a chisel to remove 1/8" off the top only where you need to.
Thanks. I'll give the belt sander a shot. If that doesn't work, I'll notch out the beams.
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Old 06-10-2008, 03:38 PM   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by beer_geek View Post
Looking good. I have a recommendation. The ground looks like it is very close to the left side of the basement window frame. Before you put on the deck boards, make sure you have enough clearance. Make sure it is properly graded. It would be a real PITA to have to fix that while prone under the deck.
Do you mean remove some dirt around the window and make sure the ground is properly graded before installing the decking boards??
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Old 06-10-2008, 03:42 PM   #13
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Here's a picture of the deck design. The only differences between this drawing and the finished deck should be:

1. The addition of some type of foundation or footings supporting the bottom of the stairs;

2. The plans only show one post mounted to the existing slab when in reality, there are two; and

3. The post supporting the intersection of the two beams at a 45 degree angle under the stairs will be a 6x6 rather than a 4x4.

I think that's it...
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Old 06-10-2008, 03:44 PM   #14
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Nice Design Software!
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Old 06-10-2008, 09:32 PM   #15
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Nice Design Software!
Thanks. It's actually Google Sketchup. You can download it for free here: http://sketchup.google.com/download/

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