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Old 05-05-2013, 10:50 AM   #46
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Deciding between build or remodel


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Thanks for the figures. only 12k for 750 ft well? That seems reasonable!
Yeah but you missed the $13,000 in payola/hush/bribes the county charges- the so called "impact fees" to build a house on land you BOUGHT, to build a house you are paying for on your own land!

Wow, here in Iowa where I'm at, when I built a new 9x12 room addition on my house in 2005 a city building permit was $5, the only requirement was a sketch of the land showing location and property line locations, they were very impressed when I generated a professional looking CAD drawing- they were used to getting pencil drawings on scrap paper.

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Old 05-05-2013, 01:24 PM   #47
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Yeah but you missed the $13,000 in payola/hush/bribes the county charges- the so called "impact fees" to build a house on land you BOUGHT, to build a house you are paying for on your own land!

Wow, here in Iowa where I'm at, when I built a new 9x12 room addition on my house in 2005 a city building permit was $5, the only requirement was a sketch of the land showing location and property line locations, they were very impressed when I generated a professional looking CAD drawing- they were used to getting pencil drawings on scrap paper.
Could you go in to detail about what procedures you had when getting impact fees, and ultimately obtaining your certificate of residency? I am curious how that works, or worked for you. If so that'd be much appreciated Wolff.

I think your example of getting the permit to add on is a viable idea of misconception between location and county and the way things are done 'here and there'. The issues previous posters have had and bring up as proof for what I will have troubles with may be hit and misses in my area. I won't know until it happens, but I do like to hear of all mistakes that were made so I can try to detour them as much as possible...hence reasoning for this thread.
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Old 05-05-2013, 01:26 PM   #48
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Deciding between build or remodel


Alpha, the best advice I can give you is to simply ignore every post/rebuttal that get's into your personal life, and isn't a direct answer to your construction questions. No one on this forum has a good read on your personal life, that's not what any of us are here (or should be here) for.

As for your idea about a steel building, I'd pass. There's a ton of complications with the floor system, and to put it simple, it's far too non-conventional to be cost effective.

Also, as a mason, I wouldn't even build a block house. Too many downsides. If you want to keep it simple, stick to something conventional like wood framing. The code for your area should be very helpful in giving you the requirements for both a block foundation and a wood framed first floor.

As for the 8" block foundation, I'd undoubtedly go with at least a 10" wide foundation. It's far easier to lay, and far stronger in terms of deflection. This won't be completely accurate for Nebraska, but here's an example of how foundation wall width, height, and re-enforcement works here in WI. Go to page 34 and take a look at the tables:

https://docs.legis.wisconsin.gov/cod...20_325/321.pdf
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Old 05-05-2013, 01:59 PM   #49
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Alpha, the best advice I can give you is to simply ignore every post/rebuttal that get's into your personal life, and isn't a direct answer to your construction questions. No one on this forum has a good read on your personal life, that's not what any of us are here (or should be here) for.

As for your idea about a steel building, I'd pass. There's a ton of complications with the floor system, and to put it simple, it's far too non-conventional to be cost effective.

Also, as a mason, I wouldn't even build a block house. Too many downsides. If you want to keep it simple, stick to something conventional like wood framing. The code for your area should be very helpful in giving you the requirements for both a block foundation and a wood framed first floor.

As for the 8" block foundation, I'd undoubtedly go with at least a 10" wide foundation. It's far easier to lay, and far stronger in terms of deflection. This won't be completely accurate for Nebraska, but here's an example of how foundation wall width, height, and re-enforcement works here in WI. Go to page 34 and take a look at the tables:

https://docs.legis.wisconsin.gov/cod...20_325/321.pdf
Thanks for the suggestion and block code. I guess I have underestimated metal buildings! Have you built a block house (concrete block not decor brick) or always done wood framing for the next floor up? If I were to frame the inside of the house with lumber after it is blocked externally, would that work out better or be a waste of labor/material rather than just wood framing in your opinion? (I like how block could be done in chunks...like start at the corner and work out one wall side gradually... and not get blown over if a storm were to come compared to an unbraced timber wall)

Thanks again.
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Old 05-05-2013, 03:29 PM   #50
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Deciding between build or remodel


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Could you go in to detail about what procedures you had when getting impact fees, and ultimately obtaining your certificate of residency? I am curious how that works, or worked for you. If so that'd be much appreciated Wolff.
These are things I can address with much familarity. For new construction in this county, there is an impact fee that must be paid up front. It actually consists of three elements: infrastructure (roads, sidewalks, etc.), schools (i.e., more residents means more children), and services (law enforcement, EMS, fire). The premise of the fees is that adding residents increases the "load" on all these things. It is not an arbitrary number; each county is required to evaluate their fees every year and adjust as necessary (though I have no idea what the evaluation criteria are). When we started our home four years ago, the total fee was just over $13,000 (commercial is much more). We had to have a receipt showing it was paid to even apply for a building permit.

As for the Certificate of Occupancy, once you have a building permit and begin construction, there are a series of required inspections the county will tell you about or will be indicated on the permit or the paperwork accompanying it. Typically, they start with the foundation footers and end with a final inspection of the completed house. What's in between varies widely, but almost always includes completed foundation, framing, rough and final electrical, rough and final plumbing, insulation, and possibly others. If you fail an inspection, the inspector will tell you why and you have to fix it and get a reinspection (sometimes at additional cost). Once the final inspection is passed, you will in a few days receive the Certificate of Occupancy in the mail. If at any time an inspector sees evidence that the house is being lived in before the Certificate has been issued, you're usually in big trouble. Since we lived in our RV on the property while building our log home, that was not an issue for us.

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Old 05-05-2013, 04:46 PM   #51
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Deciding between build or remodel


It's possible to build it without prior experience but lot's can go wrong. My son had a desire to build a post and beam cabin. He logged all the beams and siding and milled it all. His own design. He has a sleeping loft over the front door but the rest is open space. It looks like an old country church with a wood ceiling and exposed beams, 25' from the floor to the ridge line. Very beautiful inside.

He bought land that had a single wide on it so he had electric, septic and a well which gave him a start.

Just as he was finishing it, a windstorm blew the roof 800' away. If he had properly attached the roof, he would have lost everything. Settling in at night, he could hear millions of powder post beetles munching on his creation. Fumigation. When the wind blew at night the cabin shook so much that he had to sleep in his truck. He had to open the walls and stiffen the structure.
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Old 05-05-2013, 05:16 PM   #52
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It's possible to build it without prior experience but lot's can go wrong. My son had a desire to build a post and beam cabin. He logged all the beams and siding and milled it all. His own design. He has a sleeping loft over the front door but the rest is open space. It looks like an old country church with a wood ceiling and exposed beams, 25' from the floor to the ridge line. Very beautiful inside.

He bought land that had a single wide on it so he had electric, septic and a well which gave him a start.

Just as he was finishing it, a windstorm blew the roof 800' away. If he had properly attached the roof, he would have lost everything. Settling in at night, he could hear millions of powder post beetles munching on his creation. Fumigation. When the wind blew at night the cabin shook so much that he had to sleep in his truck. He had to open the walls and stiffen the structure.
Did your son not have engineered plans?? Permits? Inspections? Sounds like he just threw the thing together.
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Old 05-05-2013, 07:39 PM   #53
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Did your son not have engineered plans?? Permits? Inspections? Sounds like he just threw the thing together.
Engineered plans-NO,Permits-NO, Inspections-NO This is out in the country in Texas. As Rick Perry would say,"We don't require no stinkin plans". But he didn't just throw it together. He built it carefully but without any formal training or experience. Once he literally worked the bugs out, the building is performing well. Ins co and the bank is OK with it.
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Old 05-06-2013, 05:38 AM   #54
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The first thing you need to find out is exactly what your county is going to demand. This can vary so much from place to place that input from others outside your county are worthless. In some rural areas they literally don't care what you do. Other places they have gotten way out of control and require you to jump through a million hoops.

The basic prerequisites are things that make sense. Like is the area in a flood plain? How deep is the water table? Has a percolation test been done so the septic system can be designed accordingly?

Knowing these things up front will keep you from trading the cow for magic beans right out of the gate. The county can also tell you what building codes they follow and that will go a long way toward helping you design the place. For instance, I have a friend in Michigan that had to replace several brand new windows in his addition because they weren't big enough to accommodate the fattest fire fighter in the county. The closest fire company would have taken an hour to get there anyway but rules is rules.

The more you know before you start, the more land mines you ain't gonna step on.
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Old 05-07-2013, 07:47 AM   #55
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So it seems that the impact fees are significantly lower than the 13,000 number here.

I spoke with a concrete fella, got an estimate for a 34 x 36 basement, 8' tall, 2 standard window bucks, and 2 egress window bucks, he does block only, no excavation or water plumbing figured...he guessed around 24,000. WELL. That's a pretty penny to me. Maybe sounds reasonable to you all. I think I want to really learn how to lay concrete block and do my own foundation. Even if the idea is far fetched, if I can save 16-18 grand...I think it is worth every bit of hassle.

For Jomama...or someone who has worked with block : Why is the 10" easier to work with? Just because there is more real estate for mortar or something else that I am missing? When working on the dimension of the house, would I kill myself for going 34 x 36 rather than the initial smaller house of 32 x 34...it would be an extra 64 square feet of block...I certainly don't think that'd be too noticeable after doing the previous 1056 square feet of walls?

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Old 05-07-2013, 09:58 AM   #56
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Engineered plans-NO,Permits-NO, Inspections-NO This is out in the country in Texas. As Rick Perry would say,"We don't require no stinkin plans". But he didn't just throw it together. He built it carefully but without any formal training or experience. Once he literally worked the bugs out, the building is performing well. Ins co and the bank is OK with it.
That is why you need inspections and have engineered prints. would have saved time money and trouble. Plus that post and beam stilt foundation looks sketchy.
Some ones quote here says a lot of men build things and a lot of things fall down. Going through the permit process allows for the owner builder to learn to know what needs to be done. It is not the Government that is intruding in peoples lives. it is there to help one have a home that will last. Building Code is there for the owners safety and those who might buy it down the road. Just think if your son was hurt when the roof blew off or worst? Get the permits and do it right from the start.
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Old 05-07-2013, 11:57 AM   #57
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That is why you need inspections and have engineered prints. would have saved time money and trouble. Plus that post and beam stilt foundation looks sketchy.
Some ones quote here says a lot of men build things and a lot of things fall down. Going through the permit process allows for the owner builder to learn to know what needs to be done. It is not the Government that is intruding in peoples lives. it is there to help one have a home that will last. Building Code is there for the owners safety and those who might buy it down the road. Just think if your son was hurt when the roof blew off or worst? Get the permits and do it right from the start.
I agree with you completely. There are no requirements for plans, permits or inspections where he is out in the country. He worked through the problems but it could have gone the other way. The foundation is actually steel pipes set in concrete. Part of the solution to stiffen the structure was to weld angle iron between the posts. The post and beam structure rises above a deck built on the pipe foundation.
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Old 05-08-2013, 07:00 AM   #58
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So it seems that the impact fees are significantly lower than the 13,000 number here.
That doesn't surprise me. Many (if not most) locations don't have any impact fees at all. My current house (number 10 I've owned) is the only one that had the fee.
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Old 05-08-2013, 07:44 AM   #59
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That doesn't surprise me. Many (if not most) locations don't have any impact fees at all. My current house (number 10 I've owned) is the only one that had the fee.
Florida was sued and lost for charging enviromental impact fees on vehicles that new residents brought with them. It is just a sham practice to shake down people for more money. Clipping people for building a new house is just as bogus. Your "enviromental" foot print is the same if buy an exsisting home or rent an apartment.
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Old 05-08-2013, 10:02 AM   #60
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Florida was sued and lost for charging enviromental impact fees on vehicles that new residents brought with them. It is just a sham practice to shake down people for more money. Clipping people for building a new house is just as bogus. Your "enviromental" foot print is the same if buy an exsisting home or rent an apartment.
Can't disagree, but the fees here has nothing to do with the environment. They are based on the assumption that more houses means more people using local infrastructure and services. If I buy an existing home, I'm just replacing whoever lived there before, so there's no impact. In any case, I'd rather pay a one-time fee rather than increased taxes forever.

You want to talk about stupid fees? Because of the push to clean up the Chesapeake Bay, parts of Maryland have a "flush tax" whose proceeds go into a fund for repairing/replacing failed septic systems. They have also recently implemented a "rain tax" which charges you based on the amount of impermeable surface your property has (patios, driveways, etc). More such surfaces, more runoff into the bay instead of going into the ground, so more tax. Seriously ridiculous.

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