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Old 04-23-2011, 11:58 AM   #1
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chain link on uneven ground


I need some guidance on installing a chain link fence on uneven ground. This is the only part of the installation that is giving me a bit aggravation.

I have done some homework on bias cuts. However, I don't have a severe decline or slope.

So, where am I confused? Here are some questions?

1. If I align all the post at the same height, then I will have some gaps under the chain link. Yes, I know that I will have to add two inches to corner posts, and minus two inches for line posts. However, am I suppose to follow the grade of the ground with setting up my posts?

2. If I set up my posts to the grade of the ground, then will the fence fabric follow the contour of the ground or will it have to be cut?

I am trying to draw and visualize this snafu in my head, but someone I can't figure it out.

Noel

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Old 04-24-2011, 09:28 PM   #2
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chain link on uneven ground


My suggestion, after installing my own fence, is to stretch a string where the top of the fence will be, then measure completely along the length. Any areas along the string that are less than the height of your fencing could cause problems. I had a small hump in the ground between two posts and had to dig out some ground to get the fencing to stretch right. After it was installed, I noticed that area of the fence was noticeably shorter than the rest...and so did our labrador.
Bottom line, if the ground is uneven, you may be better off to split the fence at a post. You won't necessarily have to make a bias cut just because you split the fence. That's the great thing about chain link...it's flexible.
Hope that makes sense, and if you can do it, you'll save a bunch of cash over a fencing company.

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Old 04-25-2011, 07:12 AM   #3
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chain link on uneven ground


You find the hight spot, get the fence at the height that you want at that point, then along the way, the horizontal poles will drop to the low point, which would still be at 3-4'. If only using wire to maintain the top of the fence, you still do the same. When fence companies install fencing on ground that is uneven, they will use a surveyor to mark the heights on a land survey.
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Old 04-26-2011, 07:03 AM   #4
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chain link on uneven ground


Place your post the correct height and spacing. Pull a string along the bottom of the post as the bottom of your material would be. This will show you any high spots which would need a small "ditch" dug for the wire. Pull the wire as usual, and stretch it lightly. Starting at the end away from the fence stretcher, use five metal wire ties for each post, use a 2x4 cut into a sort of pointy end to place into the material so you can step on it to push the wire down to the ground. Tie the fence to each post securely, proceed to the next post. This will allow the material to "lay with the land" and be the correct height at each post. Been doing this for years.
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Old 04-26-2011, 05:06 PM   #5
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chain link on uneven ground


Wow! It seems so easy.

Thank you.

Be well.
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Old 05-10-2012, 04:55 PM   #6
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chain link on uneven ground


Quote:
Originally Posted by Thurman View Post
Place your post the correct height and spacing. Pull a string along the bottom of the post as the bottom of your material would be. This will show you any high spots which would need a small "ditch" dug for the wire. Pull the wire as usual, and stretch it lightly. Starting at the end away from the fence stretcher, use five metal wire ties for each post, use a 2x4 cut into a sort of pointy end to place into the material so you can step on it to push the wire down to the ground. Tie the fence to each post securely, proceed to the next post. This will allow the material to "lay with the land" and be the correct height at each post. Been doing this for years.
Thurman, how mush give, up or down does the chain link give you? In inches. I have alot of uneven ground to cover...also...not sure what you mean about the cutting and use of the 2x4...could you explain a little further? Thank you
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Old 05-10-2012, 05:08 PM   #7
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chain link on uneven ground


Thurman, couple of questions. Could you explain more about the cutting and use of the 2x4. I did quite get that part of it. Also, how flexable is residential grade chain link? can you move it up or down a few inches? 3-4 maybe?

Thank you

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