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-   -   Can't find studs behind knotty pine paneling (http://www.diychatroom.com/f2/cant-find-studs-behind-knotty-pine-paneling-5267/)

David S 12-07-2006 10:49 AM

Can't find studs behind knotty pine paneling
 
Hi,
Total neophyte here. I'm trying to find the studs behind 60 year old tongue and groove knotty pine. Don't know how thick it is. I've tried 2 different electronic stud sensors and get seemingly random beeps and flashing LEDs. Tried both regular and deep scan settings. Is it hard for stud finders to peer through knotty pine? Will a fancy, expensive finder do a better job? Currently using $20 models. Tapping and listening yields nothing, as does my old magnetic sensor.

My wife is beginning to question my value around the house (maybe that's a good thing - keep her expectations low).
Any ideas?
Thanks

KUIPORNG 12-07-2006 12:09 PM

may be the problem is the surface is pine which is also wood... try to test your stud finder on regular drywall in one of your friend's house first see if it works... if it does... then it is the pine surface causing the stud finder unable to function... if it doesn't, then you can go get a better stud finder, mine is standley which is quite good, it is more expensive, but I got it from Ebay(new) around the same price as yours after shipping added, you will be surprise to get good deal from Ebay for things like that... such as $4.99 for a new Standley stud finder...etc. which is a small thing where not too many people chasing it...

747 12-07-2006 12:44 PM

Well it should be this simple. Buy a tape measure which is marked with studs. Start at a door way or where two walls meet and stretch the tape measure out you should be in the vicinity.

Ps. I think walls are built either 12 or 16 inches on center depending on what there carring. If i'm wrong one of the carpenters will correct me.

KUIPORNG 12-07-2006 12:52 PM

don't trust the 12 or 16 inches... I did my basement... I didn't follow 16 inches on all studs although many does... it changes on circumstances...

concretemasonry 12-07-2006 02:02 PM

Could there be horizontal strapping with the vertical boards applied to it?

North Country 12-07-2006 02:29 PM

On a properly framed house, O.C stud spacing is pulled from one end of the house, walls/doors should not affect these. To find the studs on Horizontal T&G paneling see if you can see the nails or nail Gouge under/near the tongue, or if that fails then at the top of the wall, possibly under a trim strip. If you see any, then pull your 16" from there. On Vertical T&G there will be furring strips behind them, probably on 24" centers either from bottom or top plates. T&G is one of our specialties. Hope this helps

redline 12-07-2006 04:52 PM

Reason to locate the studs?
Is this an interior wall or exterior wall?

David S 12-07-2006 05:08 PM

Thanks all for your responses so far.

My sensors do work properly in other rooms where there is drywall.

So, if I understand correctly, an electronic sensor won't work to find the studs behind the vertical knotty pine because there's an air gap corresponding to the thickness of the horizontal furring strips between the paneling and the stud, right?

So, is there a good method for finding the stud behind the knotty pine? I want to hang a 100 lb. television. The paneling seems very solid. I wonder if I should even think about just screwing into the pine paneling and hope it holds.

David S 12-07-2006 05:11 PM

Interior wall.

redline 12-07-2006 05:19 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by David S (Post 26253)
Interior wall.


If this is an interior wall then I would go to the other side of the wall in the room adjacent to it. Hopefully, the opposite side of the wall is drywall. Find the studs on this wall, measure where they are and then correspond the studs with the measurements in the room with the knotty pine.

Your sensor may not work on the knotty pine if it is detecting the nails that are used to attach the knotty pine to the walls.

RegeSullivan 12-10-2006 05:21 AM

Try an old fashioned stud sensor, the kind with a magnet. If you locate the nails it is likely you will have found the studs. Once you find a nail check up and down to for other nails. When you find nails in a straight line you found the stud. If that doesn’t work and finding a stud is critical try removing the base board. Be sure to score the paint (or finish) with a sharp knife and very carefully pry it off with a putty knife and a small pry bar so you can replace the trim with minimum damage. To replace the trim pull the nails out from the back of the board and replace with new finishing nails.

joed 12-10-2006 10:15 AM

Find a receptacle. It will be nailed to one side of the stud. Then measure from there.

cece 09-03-2010 11:44 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by redline (Post 26254)
If this is an interior wall then I would go to the other side of the wall in the room adjacent to it. Hopefully, the opposite side of the wall is drywall. Find the studs on this wall, measure where they are and then correspond the studs with the measurements in the room with the knotty pine.

Your sensor may not work on the knotty pine if it is detecting the nails that are used to attach the knotty pine to the walls.




:thumbup: This is the best suggestion I found. It worked great for me. Even though this is not my original post. It answered my question. Thank you.

Tizzer 09-05-2010 04:03 PM

I'd do as N.Country mentioned and/or the receptacle idea. Look down at the baseboard to determine which side of the stud the rec. is nailed to.
Usually, baseboard is nailed to a stud but in your instance, they could've just nailed it to the panel board.
You can use a prybar and gently pull away some of the baseboard to see if you can spot where the T&G was face nailed.

Scuba_Dave 09-05-2010 04:33 PM

Original post is almost 4 years old


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