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-   -   Can you have hyrostatic pressure around your basement if only three walls are below? (http://www.diychatroom.com/f2/can-you-have-hyrostatic-pressure-around-your-basement-if-only-three-walls-below-125323/)

mikegp 12-02-2011 10:07 AM

Can you have hydrostatic pressure around your basement if only three walls are below?
 
I just had someone tell me that you can still have hydrostatic pressure on a house with only three basement walls below grade. I always thought it could not happen. I think of it like a bathtub within a larger tub. If the larger tub has 3 walls then the water would drain out before it can have any real pressure on the smaller tub, even if it had a hole in the bottom, it would be minimal pressure. Water seeks the path of least resistance, which would be out toward the above ground wall. Am I correct in my thinking? I'm talking about a two story house on a poured concrete foundation with a garage door on the front of the basement/foundation and large stone walls holding back the soil on the sides.

Bondo 12-02-2011 11:43 AM

Quote:

Am I correct in my thinking? I'm talking about a two story house on a poured concrete foundation with a garage door on the front of the basement/foundation and large stone walls holding back the soil on the sides.
Ayuh,... The path of least Resistance is the key,...

I'd guess that there's soils around yer foundation stoppin' the water from makin' the corners, 'n out...
Different soils, different resistance...

mikegp 12-02-2011 11:53 AM

I'm talking about from underneath. The pressure build up from having water above the bottom of the foundation on all four sides. Not talking about pressure from a small pool laying against a side in heavy clay soil.

joecaption 12-02-2011 12:45 PM

Of course it can, it could even have a natural spring under the house.
Having just three sides does not make a differance.

mikegp 12-02-2011 01:59 PM

Where would the pressure come from?

mikegp 12-02-2011 02:18 PM

Just to clarify. To me the pressure comes from the water on all 4 sides being higher than the water underneath the house. The water underneath wants to be level with the surrounding water causing the upward pressure.

Ron6519 12-02-2011 03:37 PM

Is the ground saturated outside the area with the walk out part of the house? I would think the ground would show signs of water if you were getting(going to get) it in your basement through the floor.

mikegp 12-02-2011 03:42 PM

It's a driveway and stairs directly in front. The sides in front of the stone walls never appear overly wet.

concretemasonry 12-02-2011 04:21 PM

I think you have it. The water will seek its own level and the soils that it flows through can affect the rate of teansmission, but it occurs 24x7 and is not instantaneous plus there is a lag time because of this. Water in some areas can rise even after a short dry period because it is already in the soil.

Dick

forresth 12-02-2011 09:10 PM

If you had proper foundation prep work with good drainage, I'd say significant hydraulic pressure was unlikely. That is a mighty big "if" we are talking there.


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