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Old 05-20-2014, 02:34 PM   #1
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Build a garden shed


Hello all,
Im about to start building a 10x10 garden shed out the back.
I have laid and levelled 3 4x4 posts on the ground so I can start building the floor frame.
I will be using 2x4's.
I am just wondering if it is a must to use pressure treated 2x4 for the floor frame. I live in Canada and do get a lot of snow in the winter.
The garden has good drainage, rain is not too common where I live anyways as summers are good and dry.

I am trying to keep costs to a minimum and already have purchase a load of non pressure treated 2x4.

Thanks
Alan

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Old 05-20-2014, 03:46 PM   #2
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I would suggest painting all exposed lumber that's not treated with something like Drylok, or http://www.grainger.com/product/4HFF...140520203505:s


Here's a list of sheds that have very good info, check them out.

http://www.familyhandyman.com/search?&q=shed&num=50

...

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Old 05-20-2014, 03:49 PM   #3
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Wood is treated to deter insect infestation, namely termites. If your area is plagued with termites they will bypass the treated wood and go for the good stuff up in the walls. Treat the dirt before construction and follow ups as recommended by the treatment manufacturer and your plain jane floor joists will last a long long time in a dry climate with good drainage. Enjoy the build.
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Old 05-20-2014, 03:50 PM   #4
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#1, The siding needs to be at least 6" up off of grade or the splash back is going to rot it out.
#2, Any framing less then 18" to grade needs to be pressure treated.
#3, 2 X 4 floor joist is way under sized, need at least 6 X 6's, 8's would be better.
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Old 05-20-2014, 04:08 PM   #5
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Build a garden shed


There is no reason to use pressure treated lumber on a garden shed. However, you don't want a wooden foundation touching soil, it will rot pretty quickly. The simplest, least cost solution I know is to put your sill on concrete block. The block can be put on as little as 6 inches of crushed stone. If you don't want to purchase enough block for the entire perimeter, you can space the blocks say four feet apart, or even eight feet apart, and use a bigger sill beam to span between the blocks.

This is a garden shed, so a little frost heave is not going to be a major issue. I have a shed built just this way, it was constructed in 1959 with concrete block every four feet around the perimeter. Half the shed has a dirt floor, was originally used as a horse stable. The other half has a wooden floor. There is absolutely no pressure treated or creosoted lumber anywhere in this shed, and it is in pretty good shape considering it has been more than fifty years with virtually no maintenance, except a new roof I put on about ten years ago. Oh, and an addition to store firewood.

By the way, my blocks are not even on crushed stone, they just dug a small trench and laid them in. Shed is not perfectly level, but its a garden shed, not a house. Good luck.
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Old 05-20-2014, 04:36 PM   #6
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Build a garden shed


To be clear, tiniest is a garden shed, not a house. Two bye fours at 16" centers over a span of 5' is sufficient unless the OP is going to drive his tractor into it...which given shed size would be an interesting trick.

I would go with concrete blocks', four under each of your timbers to get ground clearance. Then set our two bye four framing on top of that and away you go. And enjoy! Ron
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Old 05-20-2014, 07:23 PM   #7
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Thanks for the replies all much appreciated.

Yeah when he mention 6x6's for floor joists I was thinking that was overkill. I was already planning on using 2x4's at 16inch centres. The biggest or heaviest thing (apart from myself) that will be stored in the shed will be a snow blower.

Here's what I've done so far.

As you can see I have 3 concrete slabs under each 4x4 post. I will maybe put rocks/sand in between to cover ye grass underneath. Then I'll build the frame on top, then the walls etc.


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Old 05-20-2014, 07:25 PM   #8
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I have yet to put in the 3rd concrete slab in the middle of each post


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Old 05-20-2014, 07:42 PM   #9
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Were it me, I would put two more blocks per beam equally spaced. I would also move from those patio blocks to actual concrete blocks laid on their side so that the full concrete surface is on the dirt. That will give you more than you need for support, get you high enough off the ground, etc. ron
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Old 05-20-2014, 07:42 PM   #10
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I've seen railroad ties used where your 3 4x4's are sitting on the concrete posts. If you can get your hands on some used ones, they are coated with tar and last a long time on or near the ground by design.
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Old 05-20-2014, 07:49 PM   #11
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Thanks Ron,
Will take your advice and do that.
Jim if I could find some I'd consider it. Will take a look locally and see if I can my hands on some.


Even though it's not a permanent shed I want to do a good and durable build on it


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Old 05-20-2014, 08:47 PM   #12
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Just went to local lumberyard and had delivered a dozen six bye six PT timbers for a retaining wall. Only 8' long each but with the extra blocks they would just work fine. Ron
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Old 05-21-2014, 10:03 AM   #13
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Like Ron, I would place CMU's on top of the patio blocks to give the area more air space to keep it from becoming too damp under the building. However i would place the CMU's as they are designed to support the building. Another set of blocks set in the middle of each 4"X4" beams would support anything you could put into the shed. Make sure to look down the 4"X4" beams and have the bow on the top.
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Old 05-22-2014, 01:25 AM   #14
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Planning will help to design your shed in a proper way. Work out exactly what you will be using your shed for. This will help you to determine the size. Use equipments you have at your home, so that you don't have to buy much.
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Old 05-23-2014, 08:01 AM   #15
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Okay this is not rocket science or complicated....
When you purchase a shed and have it delivered.
The floor framing is resting on treated 4 x 4's.
The only thing the owner has to do is clear a spot, add 2 - 3 inches of drainage and level it.

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