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-   -   Best Way To Secure Ladder To Ladder Rack? (http://www.diychatroom.com/f2/best-way-secure-ladder-ladder-rack-159469/)

Chris Sweeney 10-08-2012 10:21 PM

Best Way To Secure Ladder To Ladder Rack?
 
I just got new ladder racks (front of bed and back of bed) for my '96 Toyota Tacoma. What is the best way to secure a ladder to the racks? Right now I use two ratcheting tie-downs, securing one around the front of the rack & ladder to the loop welded on the bed, and another one around the back of the rack & ladder securing it the same way as the front - securing it to the loop welded on the bed. This is certainly effective for me, as the ladder doesn't move AT ALL. However, I'm always looking for better ways to do things, so maybe you guys have special ways that you tie your ladders down, i.e. perhaps some special way with only one tie down, etc. Thanks!

joecaption 10-08-2012 10:35 PM

I've been just using 3 adjustable bungie cords for the past 15 years, fast simple, cheap, no rusted or stuck racket to worry about. I've never lost a ladder yet,
I see electritions using a short piece of 14-2 wire all the time. Works great, a couple of twist and it's not going to move.
http://www.amazon.com/Adjustable-Bun...le+bungee+cord

mae-ling 10-08-2012 10:58 PM

Seen everything from rope, bungee straps, ratchet straps, 14/2 wire, big twist tie things, to fancy built in clamps.

epson 10-08-2012 11:14 PM

You can use this: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Wm346_ZDunM

I myself have always used rope to tie down.

AtlanticWBConst. 10-09-2012 05:39 AM

Bungy cords will generally work with most typical ladders and extension ladders.

Larger and heavier extension ladders and things like pump-jacks are safer/secure with ratcheted tie-downs (especially due to their length = and the tendancy for them to sway & see-saw on the highway).

The key point is downward tying (very, very tightly) = you want the ladder tied as tightly as possible with downward force using the bungy (or other tie-down methods).

Tip: Always protect your eyes & face when undoing tightly secured bungies. I cannot tell you how many times I have seen people hit in the face with the end of bungy that is being unhooked.

JasperST 10-09-2012 06:54 AM

I use the rubber bungies but double up on them, just in case one breaks. I inspect them too because they will start cracking as they age.
Motorcycle ratcheting tie downs for the big stuff (plastic coated hooks).

kwikfishron 10-09-2012 06:55 AM

Whether it's lumber a ladder or Granny's rocker if it's on my rack it's secured with ratchet straps.

I wouldn't trust bungies in a wreck.

JasperST 10-09-2012 08:20 AM

If a wreck is severe enough to break four stout rubber straps on a relatively light piece of equipment then there are going to be much bigger problems.

kwikfishron 10-09-2012 06:27 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by JasperST (Post 1027163)
If a wreck is severe enough to break four stout rubber straps on a relatively light piece of equipment then there are going to be much bigger problems.

I agree, and all the more reason for one less flying projectile.

Davejss 10-09-2012 07:52 PM

I'm a twisted cable fan. A few feet of 14/2 and quick twist makes a fast, secure, simple tie down.

JasperST 10-09-2012 08:50 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by kwikfishron (Post 1027558)
I agree, and all the more reason for one less flying projectile.

Do you secure everything in your car and truck? There are number of things that can go flying in a wreck, including my dogs. I'm not strapping down everything every time I take anything on the road, period.

Chris Sweeney 10-10-2012 07:14 AM

Wow, thanks guys, all the suggestions and points you guys make are great. I guess I'll stick with the tie downs for now. I'd hate to get in a wreck and have my ladders all come flying off, potentially causing all sorts of other accidents. Those Hook-Um Dano ladder locks look awesome too, but for $65 a pop, I might just stick with the tie downs.

biggles 10-10-2012 08:13 AM

with the ladder set on the rack couple of L brackets bolted into the rails...one above the passanger side (if the ladder is on that side) to stop foward motion.then for side to side add one each about a foot or so down(front/back) the rack to stop sliding....about 1/2" off the ladder,and if possible a second bend 2"-3" on the side L bracket will hold it down.i'v done this on a 250Ford van for years and had total confidence on that rack...strip of armaflex on the rack rails will stop that tapping that will drive you crazy while driving...:censored: lenghts of solid wire are the best tie down set up


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