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Old 01-22-2009, 04:37 PM   #1
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I have a single story house with a full basement . But i hava a problem with to many steel support posts holding up four 2x10's screwed glued and bolted together. Their are two 2x10's per side with a strip of 3/4 plywood in the bolt area's . I agree this is nice but it cuts up the floor area since the basement was never intended to have living space . So what i would like to do is remove two steel posts which would have an open span of 19 feet which also holds up 30 feet of 2x10 floor joist 15 feet per side spaced on 12 inch centers . I went to Better Header and used their calculator and it says i need a W8@40 for this span seems like alot of beam but maybe not that is why i'am asking for some advise .

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Old 01-22-2009, 05:00 PM   #2
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IMHO safest and quickest answer is to get an engineer, maybe even your building dept, to check and size it. Remember you will have to bild temps to support everything while you change it out.

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Old 01-22-2009, 05:09 PM   #3
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You should spend the couple hundred and get an engineer to work this problem out for you. When you pull a permit, the town is going to ask for that anyway (a signed and sealed drawing).
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Old 01-22-2009, 06:10 PM   #4
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Any reputable lumber yard could size you a beam for what you need.

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Old 01-22-2009, 06:46 PM   #5
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I do not plan on removing what i have already in place i want to add the support underneath the 2x10's . Ya i figured as much that i have to support the joist's while doing the change over . I was trying not to get an engineer involved or the buiding department if i didn't have too .
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Old 01-22-2009, 08:14 PM   #6
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I do not plan on removing what i have already in place i want to add the support underneath the 2x10's . Ya i figured as much that i have to support the joist's while doing the change over . I was trying not to get an engineer involved or the buiding department if i didn't have too .
If you want to do the job correctly, you are going to need to get an engineer involved. A 19' span is a long span for a main basement beam. An 8" beam may be able to structurally support the span, but deflection may become an issue. Someone really needs to run the calculation to determine what is right.
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Old 01-22-2009, 10:17 PM   #7
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Do yourself a favor and get a structural engineer to size it for you. Lumberyard "designers" can size wood beams, but won't be any help with steel. A couple hundred bucks for an engineer will be money well spent.

Do yourself another favor and get a permit. Why on earth would you avoid doing that? Having a professional review your plan and double-checking your work...Advocating for YOU...Is smart. If you actually plan on doing it right you have absolutely nothing to hide. Furthermore, if and when you sell the home you'll wish you'd pulled a permit and paid for an engineer's blessing because the buyer and their inspector will most certainly ask for your documentation.

You'll find that most responsible people on this site will stop helping you as soon as you voice your intention to do work illegally.
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Old 01-23-2009, 06:07 PM   #8
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Well i asked for the advise and it seems mutual on the engineer . I guess it is alittle more in depth then i thought . Okay i have to find an engineer so where would a good place be to start to find one . Never had to deal with an engineer before so what should i ask or look for in a engineer to see if they can help me out ? Thanks
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Old 01-23-2009, 06:50 PM   #9
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Well i asked for the advise and it seems mutual on the engineer . I guess it is alittle more in depth then i thought . Okay i have to find an engineer so where would a good place be to start to find one . Never had to deal with an engineer before so what should i ask or look for in a engineer to see if they can help me out ? Thanks
I'd check your local yellow pages for a "structural engineer"
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Old 01-23-2009, 06:59 PM   #10
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As with anyone, make sure he's insured, and he has a license. Yellow pages are a great place to start. Make sure they do residential work. I do this work all the time for home owners. The engineer should come out, check out your situation, and get you going pretty quick.
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Old 01-23-2009, 08:07 PM   #11
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The local chapter of the HBA (homebuilders association) is a great way to locate an engineer that does small jobs like this. If you look up structural engineers in the phonebook you'll be chasing your tail because most or many of them won't do small jobs like yours. Many design bridges, some do towers, some do skyscrapers, and some do homes...But the phonebook won't tell you who's who. The HBA rep should be able to direct you to an engineer that normally does what you need.

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