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AndyH24 12-17-2010 07:56 PM

bathroom exhaust fan code
 
Is it code that bathroom exhaust fans be vented outdoors? I live in East TN and I hardly ever see this done. Practically none of the houses in my subdivision have any vents from exhaust fans on their roof. I live in a split-foyer home (built in 2001) that has 2 bathrooms upstairs and 1 bathroom in the basement. None of these fans vent outside. They don't even have ductwork connected to them.

Thanks,
Andy

suprvee 12-17-2010 09:05 PM

As far as I know, a bathroom exhaust fan must be vented outside. Though a roof vent isn't necessary. You can vent through the wall and use a dryer vent on the exterior, or vent through the soffit (like mine is).

Gary in WA 12-17-2010 09:08 PM

M1507.2 Recirculation of air. Exhaust air from bathrooms and toilet rooms shall not be recirculated within a residence or to another dwelling unit and shall be exhausted directly to the outdoors. Exhaust air from bathrooms and toilet rooms shall not discharge into an attic, crawl space or other areas inside the building. http://publicecodes.citation.com/ico...007_par001.htm

Gary

AndyH24 12-17-2010 09:11 PM

ok that's what I thought. How come inspectors don't catch this?

Gary in WA 12-17-2010 09:33 PM

Choose one;
unqualified for their position, don't care, retiring soon, don't know, it was Friday, forgot to write it, forgot their pen/pencil, was talking on the phone while inspecting, thinking of something/someone else, was upset with their boss/day, had to use the restroom soon, or I don't know!

Gary

VIPlumber 12-18-2010 12:05 AM

Quote:

or vent through the soffit
I disagree with that suprvee. Venting through the soffit allows the moist air drawn from the bathroom to be drawn back up through the soffit and into the attic, an unconditioned space, that in time will develop mold problems. The only way to vent a bathroom properly is through the roof.

SPS-1 12-18-2010 08:13 AM

M1507.1 General. Where toilet rooms and bathrooms are mechanically ventilated, the ventilation equipment shall be installed in accordance with this section. http://publicecodes.citation.com/ico..._15_sec007.htm

GBR, I read this as "if you vent the bathroom, it must be to the outdoor". Further north, houses are tight (at least they are supposed to be), and I need a second switch on my main floor, so I can turn on my bathroom fan for house ventilation. But in TN, I am not so sure that is the case.

Ron6519 12-18-2010 09:04 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by VIPlumber (Post 552962)
I disagree with that suprvee. Venting through the soffit allows the moist air drawn from the bathroom to be drawn back up through the soffit and into the attic, an unconditioned space, that in time will develop mold problems. The only way to vent a bathroom properly is through the roof.

There's no reason it can't be vented out a side wall of the house, away from the soffits.
Ron

warnerww 12-18-2010 02:37 PM

When I built my cabin the inspector suggested I vent out the wall because ( he said) roof vents don't work well when you have 4 feet of snow on the roof.

Jim F 12-18-2010 03:42 PM

Regardless of where you live, if you have vent fans installed with no ductwork whatsoever, the installer was incompetent. What purpose do they serve if they are not cunducting the air to another area, at least to a ventilated attic or crawl space. Where is all that shower steam going when the fan is turned on? You would be better off not turning them on at all and opening the window or door instead.

suprvee 12-20-2010 08:46 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by VIPlumber (Post 552962)
I disagree with that suprvee. Venting through the soffit allows the moist air drawn from the bathroom to be drawn back up through the soffit and into the attic, an unconditioned space, that in time will develop mold problems. The only way to vent a bathroom properly is through the roof.

You need to use an exhaust vent designed for soffits, they have all the required flaps and collars to prevent moist air backdrafts. I do agree that a roof vent would be a better choice. But for residential use, both setups will work fine. :thumbup:

Ron6519 12-20-2010 05:06 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by suprvee (Post 554129)
You need to use an exhaust vent designed for soffits, they have all the required flaps and collars to prevent moist air backdrafts. I do agree that a roof vent would be a better choice. But for residential use, both setups will work fine. :thumbup:

I don't think this will work. No flap and collar setup will eliminate moist air being sucked up to the attic. At least none I've seen.
Sounds like marketing hoopla.
Ron

oleguy74 12-23-2010 06:27 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Ron6519 (Post 554394)
I don't think this will work. No flap and collar setup will eliminate moist air being sucked up to the attic. At least none I've seen.
Sounds like marketing hoopla.
Ron

how does it do that,when there is a metal duct tube from fan to colar to out side?setup is just like a dryier vent.3"dia vent tube.

Ron6519 12-23-2010 06:32 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by oleguy74 (Post 556206)
how does it do that,when there is a metal duct tube from fan to colar to out side?setup is just like a dryier vent.3"dia vent tube.

Sorry, I don't follow what you're saying.
Ron

oleguy74 12-23-2010 06:42 PM

there is a metal flex tube/duct from fan to vent to outside air.the flapper keeps outside air from comming back into house.unless this duct comes off,no exch to attic.


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