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Old 01-26-2008, 11:39 AM   #1
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Basement Support Column Rust


Hi All. Brand new home but apparently while being built the basement was flooded for a while and now we have rust on the basement support columns.
I was planning of using a steel brush to get the rust off as best as possible and then paint it with Rustoleum. Is this the right way to do it?. But trying a steel brush it would not remove all of the rust. Can I still paint it?

Or is there a better way to fix this? Is there a danger?






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Old 01-26-2008, 12:18 PM   #2
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Basement Support Column Rust


Looks more like surface rust that anything else, yes steel brush it, Rust-Oleum and you should be ok. That IS IF IT IS AS IT LOOKS IN THE PICTURE. It the area at the floorline is all bubbled,corroded,etc that is different story

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Old 01-26-2008, 12:33 PM   #3
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Originally Posted by skymaster View Post
Looks more like surface rust that anything else, yes steel brush it, Rust-Oleum and you should be ok. That IS IF IT IS AS IT LOOKS IN THE PICTURE. It the area at the floorline is all bubbled,corroded,etc that is different story
Thanks. Can some rust still be there when I apply the rust-oleum? Does not seem that I can get it all with the steel brush. Or is another way to do this?

Last edited by phillyd2; 01-26-2008 at 12:42 PM.
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Old 01-26-2008, 04:02 PM   #4
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Basement Support Column Rust


There is a paint that will stop rust and convert it into a paintable surface. Just brush the heck out of it, clean it and paint that puppy. There are lots of brands however I think Rust oleum is probably the best know and easiest to find. Spray is easiest however GET A PC OF CARDBOARD AND HOLD IT BEHIND THE POST WHEN DOING IT keeps overspray away from everything else, ie paint in right hand, cardboard in left behind part of post u r spraying and continue till finished :}:}
good luck
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Old 01-26-2008, 07:13 PM   #5
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Basement Support Column Rust


Here is a "rust-converting" product that we have used and really like: http://www.interstateproducts.com/rustkiller.htm

It did a nice job bringing one of our dump trailers back to "new-looking" condition:

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Old 01-26-2008, 11:21 PM   #6
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Basement Support Column Rust


There are a number of rust neutralizing products on the market. Rustoleum makes one. Wire brush, apply the rust neutralizer, apply a metal primer and then a top coat. Just allow time for drying between each step.
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Old 01-27-2008, 06:07 PM   #7
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Basement Support Column Rust


Thanks all but you have confused me a bit. Is the Rustoleum "Protective Enamel" I bought the same type of rust neutralizing you guys are talking about or do I need to buy something else?
Also, are these steel columns hollow or are they filled with concrete? What I'm after is say the column did rust through would there still be support or will my house come tumbling down?
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Old 01-27-2008, 07:25 PM   #8
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Basement Support Column Rust


A neutralizing product used to be "naval jelly" which converted intact rust to a somewhat useable surface. It would turn it to brown or black as well.

To see if the pipe is hollow (most likely) just rap it with a metal tool or bolt to hear if it pings or thuds. Pinging shows a hollow sound.
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Old 01-27-2008, 08:32 PM   #9
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Basement Support Column Rust


I would be betting on concrete filled columns. All the ones I have installed were. They are real FUN to cut :{. Atlantic could verify this, I dont know of any residental permanant columns that are hollow. Besides giving lots of strength to a column I believe the concrete also slows down rust even tho we r talkin bout it. Your rust is from OUTSIDE in as most all of it is.
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Old 01-27-2008, 11:56 PM   #10
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Basement Support Column Rust


If the column is rusted through in enough area, it needs to be replaced. This is simply a matter of visual inspection after cleaning the area with a wire brush. This is easier if you get a wire wheel and put it into a drill. The process should take less then 30 minutes. If at any time you eat through the metal, stop, and call in someone with experience in replacing the pole. From your description about how the rust got there, it's probably just surface rust.
A protective enamel is just the paint topcoat. To do this correctly you need to understand the process and the sequence needed to complete the process. The Rustoleum rust neutralizer is called, Neutra rust. Rustoleum has a web site. Get on it and read about the products available. Another avenue to consider is the local paint store. Bring the picture and ask for advice on product selection.
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Old 01-28-2008, 08:24 AM   #11
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Basement Support Column Rust


You said it was new. if thats the case take a grinding wheel and remove surface rust, then repaint. my only other concern is the fact that it is embedded in the concrete. In my area we pour a footer under floor in that area and set post on top of floor and anchor with screws. anything embedded in concrete is a risk for moisture problems.
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Old 08-18-2011, 09:56 PM   #12
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Basement Support Column Rust


Not exactly sure what the policy is for resurrecting very old threads, but I have a very similar issue. I have three beams in the basement that appear to be rusting from the inside (see photo). I just moved in, so I'm not sure of any applicable history. Most of these rust deposits are at least four feet off the floor. The basement floor around the base looks fine. It's a floating floor (french drain around the perimeter), so I haven't seen any water on the floor.

During the home inspection, the inspector remarked that it was probably capillary action of water or moisture moving up the beam. He suggested drilling a few holes at the base to remove any suction. Is this a good idea? Will I wind up with water coming out of these holes onto the floor?



Any help is much appreciated. Thanks!
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Old 08-18-2011, 10:15 PM   #13
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Basement Support Column Rust


Quote:
Originally Posted by phillyd2 View Post
Thanks all but you have confused me a bit. Is the Rustoleum "Protective Enamel" I bought the same type of rust neutralizing you guys are talking about or do I need to buy something else?
Also, are these steel columns hollow or are they filled with concrete? What I'm after is say the column did rust through would there still be support or will my house come tumbling down?
That is only surface rust and can be cleaned with a wire brush as mentioned above or you can also use a sanding sponge to make the surface more smother. Apply the appropriate rust inhibiter paint and you should be good.

The column is 3 ’’ in diameter hollow and should be at least 3/16’’ thick. We supply these all the time and the primer we use is a red oxide fast drying primer for metal.
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Old 08-19-2011, 08:04 AM   #14
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Basement Support Column Rust


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Originally Posted by _alphaBeta_ View Post
Not exactly sure what the policy is for resurrecting very old threads, but I have a very similar issue. I have three beams in the basement that appear to be rusting from the inside (see photo). I just moved in, so I'm not sure of any applicable history. Most of these rust deposits are at least four feet off the floor. The basement floor around the base looks fine. It's a floating floor (french drain around the perimeter), so I haven't seen any water on the floor.

During the home inspection, the inspector remarked that it was probably capillary action of water or moisture moving up the beam. He suggested drilling a few holes at the base to remove any suction. Is this a good idea? Will I wind up with water coming out of these holes onto the floor?



Any help is much appreciated. Thanks!
Drilling holes in a support pole is stupid. Not as stupid as the suction remark, but close. I guess his contenttion was that the pole was sucking water up through the solid concrete through some mysterious scientific method. So the pole is actually a big steel straw.
Just follow the advice above to recondition the pole.
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Old 08-19-2011, 09:04 AM   #15
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Basement Support Column Rust


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Originally Posted by Ron6519 View Post
Drilling holes in a support pole is stupid. Not as stupid as the suction remark, but close. I guess his contenttion was that the pole was sucking water up through the solid concrete through some mysterious scientific method. So the pole is actually a big steel straw.
Just follow the advice above to recondition the pole.
Understood.

Out of curiosity, why are the supports rusting that high up though? His explanation made some sense that water is reaching the top of the support on the inside. Certainly no water has reached the outside that high off the floor.

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