Go Back   DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum > DIY Repair > General DIY Discussions

CLICK HERE AND JOIN OUR COMMUNITY TODAY...IT'S FREE!

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 07-13-2007, 03:56 PM   #1
Newbie
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Posts: 3
Rewards Points: 10
Default

Basement door question


My parents are remodeling their basement and it is getting close to done, i took a look and a lot of the doors are somewhat 'hinged' (as in the door frame doesnt make contact with the floor but are only attached to the top/sides) causing some of the doors to be 'squished' and the doors arent closing properly, in addition to the frames are starting to crack. when i asked the contractor about it, i was told that it is standard for doors in basement not to be attached to the floor because it might get humid and damage the doors. is this true? sounds pretty fishy to me. also, the baseboard decoration (i.e. like the crown molding, but along the floor on the wall) arent attached to the floor either. is this just incompetence or is this true? the basement is pretty dry, with A/C running at all times and the contractor also put in carpets (which would kind of contradict what they claim about the door IMO, wouldnt that mold up faster?). this is in forsyth county, GA if that is any help. i am attaching a picture to clarify my description.


thanks
Attached Images
    

number6 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-13-2007, 06:50 PM   #2
Lic. Builder/GC/Remodeler
 
AtlanticWBConst.'s Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2006
Location: New England
Posts: 7,556
Rewards Points: 2,000
Default

Basement door question


His point does make "minor sense" ........... in a large stretch of one's imagination.

What I mean is this: If a basement area is going to be finished off, the first step is to ensure that it is a "conditioned environment". That means that it is insulated from the outside elements. That is has heat for winter(cold), that it is DRY, and does not have unusual amounts of humidity.

A basement that is finished-off as a living space area, should NOT have moisture to the extent that the baseboard needs to sit above the finished flooring. The space would be un-usable. When we finish off basements, we (and experienced Contractors in general) seal off the concrete floor from the finished floor. There are various ways of doing this. Whatever the proper method is that can be used, the point is that it seals off any moisture that may be in the concrete and keeps it away from the area's finished surfaces and materials.

Consider this:
Using the same "reasoning" (hog wash ).... that he gave you, a person could say the same about bathrooms (steam, wet floors from showers and baths, etc) and kitchens (spilled liquids, wet floors from periodic mopping, etc). However, When was the last time you saw baseboard and door casings installed like that in those areas?

We have finished off hundreds upon hundreds of basements. We have gone in and repaired hundreds upon hundreds of water damaged basements.
Leaving a gap like that with the baseboards and door casings - off the finished floor is not going to help one single bit, if you have a moisture problem (or "wicking'' propblem) in your basement.
Let me clarify, In our area, this is not, nor has it ever been a practice. (on the other hand, you are in another area, but it still makes no sense - does it? (See my point about bathroom and kitchens again)


Personally, I think he's full of ''hogwash''. I don't know if he did the install himself or hired someone else who installed it that way. Someone seems to be clueless.


Last edited by AtlanticWBConst.; 07-13-2007 at 07:04 PM.
AtlanticWBConst. is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-13-2007, 07:05 PM   #3
Lic. Builder/GC/Remodeler
 
AtlanticWBConst.'s Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2006
Location: New England
Posts: 7,556
Rewards Points: 2,000
Default

Basement door question


Quote:
Originally Posted by number6 View Post
.... the basement is pretty dry, with A/C running at all times and the contractor also put in carpets (which would kind of contradict what they claim about the door IMO,....).....
Yes, that is most definitely a contradiction.
AtlanticWBConst. is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-13-2007, 07:22 PM   #4
Newbie
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Posts: 3
Rewards Points: 10
Default

Basement door question


Thanks so much for your info. I am a girl so I am totally clueless when it comes to this. My parents are elderly and foreign so they kind of back off when these guys 'claim' things. I live in a different state so I cant deal with these guys face to face. I'm making a special trip before they do the 'punch out' to make sure everything is done properly. Would it be possible to get a sample checklist of things to look at especially? They are getting an inspector and we (I was just there last week) made 3 full rounds in 3 days to try to make a full list of things they havent done properly, but when you are looking at the same thing over and over, you kind of miss some obvious/important things to look for/test out. FYI, it is 2 bed/2 bath + kitchen, laundry room and living area -- if one could point to some web links, that'd be really useful.

Again, thanks for the reply !!
number6 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-14-2007, 11:39 PM   #5
Custom Cabinet Maker
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: Netcong NJ
Posts: 1,097
Rewards Points: 500
Default

Basement door question


Atlantic; Hi again please follow me fer a sec; I looked at these photos and read and re-read Number 6's posts. NOTE: She stated that this contractor also installed " THE CARPET! " I do NOT see carpet in these photos, PLUS I am trimmer and IF TRIMMING BEFORE CARPET IS INSTALLED WE DID THIS ALL THE TIME. It prevents problems with draggin doors on plush carpet. I am NOT stickin up fer contractor just stating that there is NO carpet I see :}:}:}

Number 6 is this a permitted job? As in was a permit required and gotten?
If I am wrong and the photos just dont show carpet well and this spacing is above the carpet then IT IS WRONG AND I WOULD BE HAVING THE BUILDING INSPECTOR IN THE ROOM HAVING A CONVERSATION WITH HIM ASAP.Sign nothing and go get an independent Home/Building Inspector to check it all out!
JackM
skymaster is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-15-2007, 07:25 AM   #6
Lic. Builder/GC/Remodeler
 
AtlanticWBConst.'s Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2006
Location: New England
Posts: 7,556
Rewards Points: 2,000
Default

Basement door question


Quote:
Originally Posted by skymaster View Post
NOTE: She stated that this contractor also installed " THE CARPET! " I do NOT see carpet in these photos, PLUS I am trimmer and IF TRIMMING BEFORE CARPET IS INSTALLED WE DID THIS ALL THE TIME. It prevents problems with draggin doors on plush carpet. I am NOT stickin up fer contractor just stating that there is NO carpet I see :}:}:}
Sky,

First off, when we install baseboard in a "to-be-carpeted" area, we always use ''spacers'' to set it up 1/2" off the subfloor. We also speak to the client about their carpet pile choice and pad thickness choice and then adjust the cut of the lower door to accomodate the thickness of the carpet and the carpet pad.

Obviously, the pictures posted are in an area where there is no carpet installed, but has a finished floor. (Evidently, there is carpeting in another area of the remodeled basement)

The poster also stated the important point below, which shows that the guy hired said that the trim work was installed that way because of this lame excuse (not because of carpeting):

"....i was told that it is standard for doors in basement not to be attached to the floor because it might get humid and damage the doors. is this true? sounds pretty fishy to me...."

- He mentioned NOTHING about it being done that way for the purpose of carpeting.

Last edited by AtlanticWBConst.; 07-15-2007 at 08:14 AM. Reason: spelling
AtlanticWBConst. is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-15-2007, 08:01 AM   #7
Lic. Builder/GC/Remodeler
 
AtlanticWBConst.'s Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2006
Location: New England
Posts: 7,556
Rewards Points: 2,000
Default

Basement door question


Quote:
Originally Posted by number6 View Post
....Would it be possible to get a sample checklist of things to look at especially? They are getting an inspector and we (I was just there last week) made 3 full rounds in 3 days to try to make a full list of things they havent done properly, but when you are looking at the same thing over and over, you kind of miss some obvious/important things to look for/test out. FYI, it is 2 bed/2 bath + kitchen, laundry room and living area -- if one could point to some web links, that'd be really useful.
Off the top of my head:

Basements - Make sure that ALL surfaces of doors are painted. That includes the bottoms of doors (often skipped). Most ''economy doors'' are hollow cored with medium density wood pulp inner cores. Because of this, such doors installed in any humid level of a home (especially - more so in basements) can absorb some of the higher humidity molecules in the basement air. They will then swell to the point that doors will no longer shut properly or operate properly. Painting all surfaces helps to seal them completely from any humidity and swelling.

Electrical outlets - Make sure that the holes were not over-cut when drywalling.

Wood Trim-work -Nail holes should be puttied properly. Seams and joints should be tight, or puttied.

Electrical - Check all switches for function. Look for electrical inspection rough and finished sign off's.

Framing - Use a level to check for Plumb on walls and door jambs.
Also, did he use Pressure Treated lumber, or other "resistant" lumber on the bottom plates of the framed walls (the bottom that touches the concrete floor)?

Flooring - Did he use some kind of moisture barrier between the finished floor and the concrete floor pad? Poly or water proof paint? other?

Moisture - If he is as concerend about "moisture" as he claimed to be, did he use a "Moisture meter" to test the basement areas (concrete flooring too) prior to start of work. )Example: Moisture content of the concrete. Did he inquire about any moisture issues in the past with the owners, prior to start, as well? (It's the first question we ask when doing a basement remodeling estimate)

Insulation - What did he use? If he was that concerned about "Moisture" in the basement, he would have installed rigid foam board insulation on the lower 12" of the stud cavities, with batt style insulation above it.

Drywall - IMPORTANT - Use a bright light (halogen work light, if possible) and go around shining it along the wall/ceiling surfaces at an angle - across the surfaces (like the way the the moon is lit at night and you can see the craters). Do it like that and you will be able to see how good of a job was done. That is my standard "tool" for checking our own drywall work (and I ALWAYS find isues).

Paint - Were the walls properly primed before coating? Were they properly sanded between paint coats, so that the surfaces are smooth (no painted-over dust specs, etc...)

Access panels - Did he make sure to leave access to important utility shut offs or other areas?
Is there the proper sized area around the electrical panel. Code dictates that if a panel is "closed-off" (example: a closet) that there is enough room for a fireman to access the area in the event of an emergency. I believe it's 30" by 30" (?)

Furnace - Did he install proper venting; either an outside fresh air intake or vents in walls, doors to the new living area, that allows the the required amount of exchange air for the unit. The furnace should not be closed off without access to the proper amount of exchange air.
http://www.blueflame.org/datasheets/combustair.html
http://www.rewedmonton.ca/content_view2?CONTENT_ID=351

Heating - Did he install the proper amount of heat for the square footage of the remodeled living environment?

Permits - Did he pull the right permits and have all the proper inspections and sign off's done with records of it? (electrical, plumbing, building permits)

Licensing and Registration - Does he have an "up to date" license, and is he properly registered with the town/state - to do the work that was performed?

Bathroom (shower/tub) - If there was one put in, did he install the required exhaust venting in the area (for moisture)?

http://www.infoforbuilding.com/Punchlist_N.html

Last edited by AtlanticWBConst.; 07-15-2007 at 08:13 AM. Reason: Grammer
AtlanticWBConst. is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-17-2007, 03:54 PM   #8
Newbie
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Posts: 3
Rewards Points: 10
Default

Basement door question


Thanks so much for all the responses. The list will be especially useful. The pictures i posted is of the bathroom/kitchen, where carpet was not installed, it was easier to put the camera down on an uncarpeted area to get a shot to clarify what i meant by the door not being installed on the floor. sorry for the confusion. almost all other rooms have carpet installed. Once again, thanks for all the suggestions.

number6 is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Do I need a HVAC return vent in basement? westing HVAC 13 04-03-2014 02:43 AM
Basement - need to bust up about 1 ft deeper FallenAngel Building & Construction 7 08-15-2007 10:09 AM
Sub Basement Walkout - Please Help pgs_28 Building & Construction 11 08-12-2007 10:55 PM
Noob question for basement finish electrical dtmbizzle Electrical 16 07-11-2007 08:08 AM
Wet Basement being fixed (pics) harleysilo Remodeling 2 01-23-2007 09:09 AM




Top of Page | View New Posts

Copyright © 2003-2014 Escalate Media. All Rights Reserved.