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-   -   Base Moulding Question (http://www.diychatroom.com/f2/base-moulding-question-61544/)

diykc 01-10-2010 08:27 PM

Base Moulding Question
 
What is the best way to handle a butt joint in base moulding? 45 both pieces and overlap or just butt one piece against the next?

Also, how much gap should I leave? We are putting in a thick freesia and 1/2" looks to be about right with the test pieces I've tacked up.

jlhaslip 01-10-2010 08:55 PM

Depends on the profile of the base mouldings. Some of them are difficult to cope cut.
45 miter cuts should work, although on some corners, you may need to cut 44 or 46 degree angles to get a good fit. Or something in between.

diykc 01-10-2010 09:25 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by jlhaslip (Post 380499)
Depends on the profile of the base mouldings. Some of them are difficult to cope cut.
45 miter cuts should work, although on some corners, you may need to cut 44 or 46 degree angles to get a good fit. Or something in between.


Thanks JL, what I'm asking is where I have a long run and have to splice pieces together, is it better to 45 each end or just butt them together. I have 4 long runs like this.

jlhaslip 01-10-2010 09:46 PM

Scarf joints are usually cut in joining pieces mid-span.
Cut them at 22 1/2 or 30 degrees, stain/paint the ends in case of shrinkage. Nail both pieces near the joint.
Best way is to nail the first piece hard. Cut and nail the joint and work the nailing to the far end.

*edit*

A scarf joint is a matching angled cut on two pieces that join in the middle.
The angle is not critical as long as the matching pieces get the same cut.

bjbatlanta 01-11-2010 09:49 AM

I generally 45 and glue them to keep from separating....

hyunelan2 01-11-2010 11:01 AM

I scarf the joint at 45*, and typically put a trim-nail right through both pieces, into the wall, at the joint (if it is not delicate molding that may crack/splinter). Since I use white trim, a quick fill with latex caulk, and touch-up with the same white paint I used for the trim makes the joints virtually disappear.

Helmet 01-11-2010 09:02 PM

The caulking mentioned above is the key. Most joints are just painted over but with a little caulking smeared into the space you have to look really hard to find the joint after you have painted it.

diykc 01-13-2010 09:01 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by hyunelan2 (Post 380761)
I scarf the joint at 45*, and typically put a trim-nail right through both pieces, into the wall, at the joint (if it is not delicate molding that may crack/splinter). Since I use white trim, a quick fill with latex caulk, and touch-up with the same white paint I used for the trim makes the joints virtually disappear.


Thank you! I like it. I nailed closed to each end but I like the idea of pinning them together at the joint and caulk was already in the plans!! :thumbsup:

ARI001 01-13-2010 09:09 AM

A scarf joint is typically used in production grade trim jobs. Forty-five degrees is typical, reinforced with glue. If done correctly caulk is not necessary but a light sanding of the joint may be. The "best way" to join the two lengths is by doweling them together essentially making one reinforced full length piece. This is usually specified in "high end" trim applications.


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