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Old 10-21-2008, 10:54 AM   #1
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Asbestos


I had some 9" x 9" tiles removed from my floor. The company that removed it put a white encapsulant over the floor. You can still see that there is glue from the tiles on the floor, which has been covered with the encapsulent.

Some of the white encapsulant is chipping loose and has a brown fiber on the back. I don't know if that is brown from the wood floor or residue from the tiles.

What is the best course of action?

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Old 10-21-2008, 11:07 PM   #2
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Asbestos


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Originally Posted by Densec View Post
I had some 9" x 9" tiles removed from my floor. The company that removed it put a white encapsulant over the floor. You can still see that there is glue from the tiles on the floor, which has been covered with the encapsulent.

Some of the white encapsulant is chipping loose and has a brown fiber on the back. I don't know if that is brown from the wood floor or residue from the tiles.

What is the best course of action?
I'm no expert, but it seems to me that asbestos is only toxic if you're breathing it in.... I don't think a spec of it on your floor, covered up by yet another floor, is of any concern at all whatsoever.

Again, I'm no expert.

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Old 10-22-2008, 01:43 AM   #3
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Asbestos


I agree with ZeroTX. Asbestos is only a hazard if inhaled. So, don't sand that small spot and snort the dust up your nose with a rolled up $20 bill, and you should be OK. Just leave it as is. Or paint over it with something white to match the rest of the "encapsulant".

PS: Asbestos is not well understood. Did you know that the PARKS in the San Fransisco Bay area have an airborne asbestos fiber count that's 50 times higher than the OSHA would allow in a workplace without the employer providing protective dust masks to the employees?

It's true. Asbestos is one of the most abundant minerals in the Earth's surface, and it's exceedingly abundant in all of California and in the Piedmont area of Virginia. The local gravel pits in California supply the gravel needed to make roads through the parks in the San Fransisco Bay area. This gravel, like all rocks in California have a high asbestos content, and when cars drive over gravel roads in the parks, their tires grind the rocks together creating clowds of dust that has a very high asbestos content.

But, people in the San Fransisco Bay area live long healthy lives as well as the rest of us. So, why don't they all get some form of terminal lung disease? The simple answer is that no one knows. Why some people that have been exposed to asbestos dust gets lung disease and other people don't is just one of those curveballs that Mother Nature throws at us. It's the same thing with everything. Some people can smoke all their lives and die of pneumonia at age 98. Other people smoke their whole life and die of lung cancer at 45. Similarily, asbestos is not "clear cut".
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Old 10-22-2008, 08:01 AM   #4
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Asbestos


Thanks for the comments. I think painting it is probably a good idea. Can you recommend a good sealer or primer? I have Zinsser products and they seem good, like Stain Killer.

Is there a big advantage to oil based over water based?

I guess a painted floor is always going to be a trouble area because of the foot traffic, etc.
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Old 10-22-2008, 01:50 PM   #5
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Asbestos


Do you know if the tile adhesive was tested for asbestos? Many tile mastics contained the big A. Was the removal and encapsulation job done by a certified asbestos abatement contractor? If so, call him back to re-encapsulate it.
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Old 10-22-2008, 09:44 PM   #6
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Originally Posted by Densec View Post
Is there a big advantage to oil based over water based?
Yes. An alkyd or polyurethane floor paint will cure to a much harder film that will stand up well on a floor, whereas a latex "Porch & Floor Enamel" will dry(first) and then cure(second) to a relatively soft film that won't. But, since you'll probably have trouble finding a WHITE floor paint (a very impractical colour for a floor), then you're probably best off to just use a white interior alkyd wall paint that's about the same gloss as the white encapsulant that's there now.

Since what you have now is essentially a white floor, you might want to consider repainting the whole floor with a paint roller. It's only a matter of time before foot traffic marks up that white encapsulant and you start thinking about cleaning the marks off. It'd be easier to clean them off of an alkyd or polyurethane floor paint because if you scrub too hard and scrub the paint right off, you'll see the white underlying layer and stop. Whereas if you scrub the encapsulant too hard, you might start seeing floor tile, in which case you've exposed the tile again.

Last edited by Nestor_Kelebay; 10-22-2008 at 09:49 PM.
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Old 10-24-2008, 06:11 AM   #7
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Asbestos


could someone explain the dangers of asbestos to me?
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Old 10-24-2008, 06:36 AM   #8
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Asbestos


There are tons of web sites devoted to asbestos. Very briefly, asbestos is one of the base elements in the universe. It is found and mined as a mineral, processed and refined. It was used in many common household and construction products. It is an excellent thermal insulation and fireproofing product. As such, it was used extensively in ship construction and fireproofing on steel. Workers heavily exposed began to come down with respiratory issues, lung cancer, mesothelioma and what became known as asbestosis, which is a thickening of the lung walls due to scar tissue. These problems were attributed to asbestos exposure. Asbestos fibres are splintery and have jagged barbs on them. When they get trapped in lung tissue they stick and do not dislodge, much like certain seeds and burrs cling to a persons clothing. The body cannot disolve them, so it encapsulates them. This is what essentially causes the thickening of the lung tissue. If the fibre creates irritation, it could result in lung cancer. Most fibres that are inhaled are also exhaled, but not all. People who smoke are at far greater risk, because the fibers will cling to the residual tars in their lungs. Health effects from exposure can take from 7 to 20 years to surface. Microscopic fibres can remain airborne for long periods of time in a household environment and can be stirred into the air, over and over if not removed. Fibres can be ingested in food and water as well, but that is far less of an issue than inhalation. In the U.S., asbestos was banned from most products, but not all. Where a suitable replacement could not be found, asbestos continues to be used in a few products. Properly handled, asbestos will not bite you. Use common sense if you have deal with it. Tying a handkerchief over your face won't protect you. Sweeping it up with a household vacuum will only load the air with fibers.
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Old 10-24-2008, 06:39 AM   #9
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Asbestos


thanks for the advice, its most appriciated. i will look at some of these web sites.

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