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-   -   Aluminum or vinyl bathroom vent hose (http://www.diychatroom.com/f2/aluminum-vinyl-bathroom-vent-hose-132038/)

Michaelpro 01-30-2012 10:57 PM

Aluminum or vinyl bathroom vent hose
 
For a bathroom fan, is one preferable to the other? I live in Arkansas so the climate is generally pretty warm. The bathroom is tiny, like 60SF. The run will be no more then 9 feet.

joecaption 01-30-2012 11:00 PM

Both will work fine.

Bob Mariani 01-31-2012 04:41 AM

As joecaption stated, both are fine for a bath fan. Solid pipe is still better. Plastic should never be used for a dryer run, but fine for bath vents.

Just Bill 01-31-2012 07:09 AM

What Bob said, rigid pipe is smooth and has no places to cause turbulence so air flows smoother.

Michaelpro 01-31-2012 07:26 PM

I'm going to go with a flexible vinyl for a couple of reasons. First the run is really short and the flexible will be easier for a novice like me to work with. Second, the idiots who built this house never vented the bathroom. When I started renovating the bathroom I pulled the fan out and it doesn't go anywhere. I got up in the attic and there is no venting for the fan whatsoever. For forty years without being vented I was shocked to find very little molding around the insulation. The bathroom is small, and I guess that is the main reason there isn't molding.

My house has a couple of Whirlybirds in the roof. Would it be acceptable to just run the vent up to it and secure it? I know it isn't the proper way to vent, but I really don't want to mess with the roof and there isn't a way to vent out a wall. I would think that venting it at all would be better than the way it was before.

What do you think?

Gary in WA 01-31-2012 11:44 PM

I would never run it to a whirlybird. Out the gable, if there is one: http://www.diychatroom.com/f2/anothe...estion-131253/

Gary

Michaelpro 02-01-2012 12:23 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by GBR in WA (Post 840991)
I would never run it to a whirlybird. Out the gable, if there is one: http://www.diychatroom.com/f2/anothe...estion-131253/

Gary

Alas I have a hip roof so no gables for me. I might possibly be able to run it to the vents that come out under the eves of the house, but that would entail some serious crawling haha.

If you don't mind me asking, why wouldn't you run it up to a whirlybird?

Thanks for your suggestions!

pete0403 02-01-2012 02:28 AM

IMO I think the whirlybird would be trying to suck air out of your bathroom...on extra windy days it would probably make your damper rattle. That would be annoying.

Gary in WA 02-01-2012 09:35 PM

Pete said it! You would also be blowing wet air against the fan turbine when it wasn't windy enough to turn it, a little extra water there to give rust if any nicks or screws not galvanized enough. Could freeze locking the turbine until warmer weather, depends on climate.

Vent to the soffit and some moist air will come back and mold the attic framing- that is the location of the attic intakes- remember.

Gary

Michaelpro 02-02-2012 02:03 PM

Thanks guys.

You have a good point about the whirlybird sucking from the vent all of the time. I didn't think about that. Since I don't have the experience to vent through the roof I am going to vent to the vicinity of the whirlybird....for now. I'll do it properly in the near future.

Considering it was never vented in the first place I think this will still be better.

There was also no mold, which is strange. Maybe the vent didn't work in the first place haha.

Jim F 02-02-2012 10:14 PM

Venting through the roof is probably your best option. I know that sounds daunting but, with a little research you could probably do it. Failing that, maybe hire a pro to put the roof vent where you want it.

Your next best option is throught the side wall if you have an exterior wall in your bathroom. Venting out the eve vent is a bad plan. People do it but those are designed to draw air in and up through, in your case, the whirlybirds.

The lack of mold in your attic suggests that the moisture was being adaquately vented out before but it is still not the recommended way. Bathroom ventillation becomes more of a concern if you have people in the house that like to take long showers like teenagers.

pete0403 02-05-2012 11:49 AM

Since we're on venting to the roof, I have a question I've always wondered about and one that might help Michael when he puts a roof vent in (not sure how cold it gets in AR).

When the warm moist air goes up the pipe to the roof vent in the winter, what stops condensation from forming and running back down to the fan?

Can you put enough insulation wrap around it to prevent condensation in northern climates?

Michaelpro 02-05-2012 01:59 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by pete0403 (Post 845042)
Since we're on venting to the roof, I have a question I've always wondered about and one that might help Michael when he puts a roof vent in (not sure how cold it gets in AR).

When the warm moist air goes up the pipe to the roof vent in the winter, what stops condensation from forming and running back down to the fan?

Can you put enough insulation wrap around it to prevent condensation in northern climates?

I was wondering the same thing. I would think that if the pipe was rigid enough and the flow was fast enough you wouldn't really have to worry about it.
Something vinyl like I used would also conduct heat and cold less than aluminum. The temperature difference would be so dramatic that material type probably doesn't matter anyways.

Jim F 02-06-2012 08:25 PM

I have all vinyl parts to my roof vent. No condensation problems but you do have to kep the snow from covering it up in winter.


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