Go Back   DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum > DIY Repair > General DIY Discussions

CLICK HERE AND JOIN OUR COMMUNITY TODAY...IT'S FREE!

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 01-09-2009, 10:13 AM   #1
Newbie
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Posts: 5
Rewards Points: 10
Default

Addition looks like it is on a deck...lack of a better term


Hi,

What is is called when an addition is on the 2nd story, but the addition is up on stilts....I have no idea how to describe this. Here is a picture I found online: http://images.google.com/imgres?imgu...%3Den%26sa%3DN

It appears that the deck was converted into an interior space.

After I figure out the proper terminology, I want to learn more about the pros and cons of this type of addition.

Thanks!
Melissa

Melissa1 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-09-2009, 10:19 AM   #2
Master General ReEngineer
 
Bondo's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: Chaumont River, Ny.
Posts: 3,717
Rewards Points: 2,068
Default

Addition looks like it is on a deck...lack of a better term


Ayuh,...

That's just an addition built on a Post,+ Pier foundation...

Bondo is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 01-09-2009, 10:51 AM   #3
Registered User
 
Termite's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Posts: 6,520
Rewards Points: 2,000
Default

Addition looks like it is on a deck...lack of a better term


The piers that would support a deck will typically be inadequate for support of a habitable living space. It is certainly possible to build an addition this way, but much larger piers and bearing structure would be required. An engineer is needed to determine the correct pier size. So, you normally can't throw a roof and walls on what was an exterior deck and expect it to perform structurally.

Personally, I see few advantages to this configuration. Insulating the floor adequately is very important, and any plumbing in the room is a real challenge. Personally, I'd opt for a slab on grade with trench footings instead...Much warmer and less cheesy of a design. If grade is too low, go with a poured footing/foundation and framed floor over a crawlspace.
Termite is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-09-2009, 10:52 AM   #4
Lic. Builder/GC/Remodeler
 
AtlanticWBConst.'s Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2006
Location: New England
Posts: 7,556
Rewards Points: 2,000
Default

Addition looks like it is on a deck...lack of a better term


That's an addition built on pier footings (as already stated).

Some of the Pros:
Save on costs of excavation work, soil removal, form-work, and amount of concrete. Less cost overall to do, than a full foundation addition.


Some of the cons:
Enclosed room's flooring, may not be as stable as a full enclosed foundation (May affect tile work).
Space underneath is somewhat open to the elements. In the case of any plumbing there; even closed and insulated, pipes can freeze.
Some don't like the look of a room attached to the house without a foundation like the rest of the house has.
Joist area underneath should be closed-off if Pressure Treated lumber or other non-resistant lumber is not used.

The majority of room additions built on pier footings are designed to be used as 3-season rooms. Such purpose means that they may not have any electrical, they have no insulation,
no Low-e rated windows, and no source of heat.

If two floor levels are to be added, as opposed to a single floor room addition, standard pier footings will not necessarily support the added load.
AtlanticWBConst. is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-09-2009, 11:22 AM   #5
Newbie
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Posts: 5
Rewards Points: 10
Default

Addition looks like it is on a deck...lack of a better term


Thanks for the responses.

I would NOT be doing an addition on an existing deck, it would be a new structure. It would extend out only 7.5 feet. There would be a bathtub (no sink or toilet) but the plumbing would run an interior wall, not the floor.

I can do a regular foundation running from the basement, but I have many major systems it would disrubt, such as my above ground main sewer line (very old house), an outside grinder pump, and my basement water drainage system. I suspect that altering these major systems will cost a ton of money for 7.5 feet. Not to mention, I do not need, nor want the extra 7.5 feet in the basement.

Of course, I don't want something that is not structurally sound or good for the long term. I also would definitly need this for a 4 season room as it is adding closet space and a larger bath onto my MBR.

i would love to hear anyone else's input/thoughts.
Melissa1 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-09-2009, 12:45 PM   #6
Registered User
 
Termite's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Posts: 6,520
Rewards Points: 2,000
Default

Addition looks like it is on a deck...lack of a better term


If you're installing a bathtub, your tub's drain plumbing will in fact have to be in the floor. There's no way around that.
Termite is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-09-2009, 02:24 PM   #7
Newbie
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Posts: 5
Rewards Points: 10
Default

Addition looks like it is on a deck...lack of a better term


Quote:
Originally Posted by thekctermite View Post
If you're installing a bathtub, your tub's drain plumbing will in fact have to be in the floor. There's no way around that.
Of course, but the potential freezing issue (I'm in the south, so it can happen, but not as likely as in other areas) is minimized since it is drain pipe and not a supply line? No?
Melissa1 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-09-2009, 02:34 PM   #8
Registered User
 
Termite's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Posts: 6,520
Rewards Points: 2,000
Default

Addition looks like it is on a deck...lack of a better term


Your trap always has water in it. The remainder of the pipe will drain dry. The trap will freeze quite easily and block the drain, probably break it as well. There are electrical tape products that can be used to heat pipes.
Termite is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-09-2009, 02:44 PM   #9
Newbie
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Posts: 5
Rewards Points: 10
Default

Addition looks like it is on a deck...lack of a better term


Quote:
Originally Posted by thekctermite View Post
Your trap always has water in it. The remainder of the pipe will drain dry. The trap will freeze quite easily and block the drain, probably break it as well. There are electrical tape products that can be used to heat pipes.
Got it, so basically because of the smaller volume of water, it is actually probably more likely to freeze if it got so cold.

Thanks!
Melissa1 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-10-2009, 10:01 AM   #10
Master General ReEngineer
 
Bondo's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: Chaumont River, Ny.
Posts: 3,717
Rewards Points: 2,068
Default

Addition looks like it is on a deck...lack of a better term


Quote:
Originally Posted by Melissa1 View Post
Got it, so basically because of the smaller volume of water, it is actually probably more likely to freeze if it got so cold.

Thanks!

Ayuh,...

Actually,... It's the fact that it's Standing Water,... ei; Not Moving...
It has ittle to do with the Volume involved...
Bondo is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 01-28-2010, 11:28 PM   #11
Newbie
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Alabama
Posts: 1
Rewards Points: 10
Default

Addition looks like it is on a deck...lack of a better term


Hi,
My name is Dorothy and I am new to this forum and your pics are the same ideal i have for remodeling on my Deck. I would like to turn my deck into a room but I got this rediculous price for doing this 20,000.00 dollars. I don't think this is a good price. Have you had an estimate done for something like this. If so, I would like to know how much. My room would be a 16 x 16 if this information help. I don't know a lot about pricing for a room but I think this is a bit much. Anyone, that can help me please. I would like 4 windows and a standard door.

Thank you,
Dorothy
dweathington is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-29-2010, 12:10 AM   #12
Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: South of Boston, MA
Posts: 17,248
Rewards Points: 2,000
Default

Addition looks like it is on a deck...lack of a better term


Quote:
Originally Posted by dweathington View Post
Hi,
My name is Dorothy and I am new to this forum and your pics are the same ideal i have for remodeling on my Deck. I would like to turn my deck into a room but I got this rediculous price for doing this 20,000.00 dollars. I don't think this is a good price. Have you had an estimate done for something like this. If so, I would like to know how much. My room would be a 16 x 16 if this information help. I don't know a lot about pricing for a room but I think this is a bit much. Anyone, that can help me please. I would like 4 windows and a standard door.

Thank you,
Dorothy
Pricing varies by area & specific job
This is a DIY site, not a pricing site
Get several local estimates & checxk references
Scuba_Dave is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-29-2010, 10:38 AM   #13
Lic. Builder/GC/Remodeler
 
AtlanticWBConst.'s Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2006
Location: New England
Posts: 7,556
Rewards Points: 2,000
Default

Addition looks like it is on a deck...lack of a better term


Quote:
Originally Posted by dweathington View Post
Hi,
My name is Dorothy and I am new to this forum and your pics are the same ideal i have for remodeling on my Deck. I would like to turn my deck into a room but I got this rediculous price for doing this 20,000.00 dollars. I don't think this is a good price. Have you had an estimate done for something like this. If so, I would like to know how much. My room would be a 16 x 16 if this information help. I don't know a lot about pricing for a room but I think this is a bit much. Anyone, that can help me please. I would like 4 windows and a standard door.

Thank you,
Dorothy
$20K sounds very reasonable to me. I am not sure what you are basing your price comparision, and evaluation to?

Have you had something like this done before, in the last several years?

Realize that just because there is a deck there, does not mean the cost will be cut in half.

FWIW - We have done quite a few of these.

There is a lot of work involved, much more than simply slapping-up 4 walls and a roof. Realize that the $20K is made up of a lot of smaller project cost numbers. Example:

- The existing home's roof needs to be tied into the new roof = more work & money = home's roof materials removed/demolition, and added materials for the home's roof itself.
- The new room's siding and wall, must be tied into the existing home's exterior walls & siding = demolition, and added materials for the home itself.
- Low-e doors and windows are not cheap.
- Insulation
- If you want to have heat & electrical, that can add $3K-$4K, if your current home system requires upgrading to do that, it can add more.
- Drywall
- Painting
- Exterior finishes (siding & trim)
- Permits & fees
- City/town inspections = time = $
- Modification of the entryway into the new room from the home (if planned)
- Required drawings for permit
- Interior trimwork
- Trash haul out
- Flooring materials
- Roofing materials
- Gutters?
- Exterior entry stairs and concrete stair pad (if planned)
- Attached deck? = $$
- Etc, etc, etc....

A room has a lot more weight that needs to be supported, than a deck. Sometimes, it is even better to rip the deck down, and start over by creating the pier footings and structure that is better suited, and stronger to support the new room (walls, floor, roof, additional roof weight (snow loads), sheetrock, windows, etc)

When I apply for a permit for such a project, I have to provide a complete set of structural framing plans to the building Dept (floor, roof, ceiling, 3 walls, and any beam calculations). I charge for the time involved to produce/create such detailed plans. It is part of the scope of the project.

FWIW - I now do a breakdown of the entire projects using smaller numbers, that equal out to the final large numbers. I do this, so that my potential Clients can see where the final price has derived from.
I also lay out the entire sequence of what is to take place, so that Home Owner's can see the large amount of work and multiple phases that are involved to start & complete such a project.
AtlanticWBConst. is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-29-2010, 11:11 AM   #14
Old School
 
Willie T's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: St. Petersburg, FL Minds of moderate caliber ordinarily condemn everything which is beyond them.
Posts: 3,634
Rewards Points: 2,000
Default

Addition looks like it is on a deck...lack of a better term


$20k seems very reasonable. It would run an additional 25% or more here.

__________________
"True eloquence consists in saying all that is necessary, and only that which is."
François Duc de La Rochefoucauld
Willie T
Willie T is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Post detail for raised covered deck jogr Building & Construction 3 05-16-2009 08:46 AM
Home Addition's foundation question? chai3341 Building & Construction 13 01-02-2009 12:46 AM
The Bioswale, french drain, deck, drainage dilemma (long) seabright_sc Building & Construction 2 01-05-2008 04:37 PM
Deck at seasonal camp site... Spike99 Project Showcase 0 12-24-2007 04:09 PM
What size deck is 'good' for our situation? curls00 Carpentry 20 09-08-2007 08:12 PM




Top of Page | View New Posts

Copyright © 2003-2014 Escalate Media. All Rights Reserved.