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-   -   3D Glue-On Wall Panels? (http://www.diychatroom.com/f2/3d-glue-wall-panels-145266/)

Bonster 05-29-2012 07:12 PM

3D Glue-On Wall Panels?
 
Anyone ever installed 3D glue-on wall panels like these?

http://i.imgur.com/iMF7Z.jpg

I'm thinking about using them on a section of a wall that used to be covered with wood paneling. Whoever took the paneling off left the gobs of glue behind, which I believe may be a real pain to remove. Instead of trying to dissolve and/or scrape off the glue, sand down the wall, prime and paint, I'm wondering if putting something like those panels up might be easier -- and perhaps create an attractive accent wall.

But I have my doubts that installing them is as easy as the company claims, so am wondering if any of you have experience with them. And at about $100 per box (which covers just under 28 s.f.) (includes shipping), it's certainly more expensive than painting.

Maybe textured vinyl wallpaper would be a better idea?

ComputerMagic 05-29-2012 07:39 PM

glue on wall panel
 
i havent done those, but i did do textured vinyl wallpaper and i would recommend against that. it is *so* delicate! every little thing dings it and it constantly looks like cr*p.

its in my hallway/foyer and im sorry its there. it always went up after paneling removed and i had the same glue problem.

i've been hunting for something more durable for this hallways for a while.

Joe.

ThatDaveGuy 05-30-2012 06:50 AM

Those may look all sporty in the pic but don't you think they'll be a PITA to keep clean? Along with the price........ I'd tear the wall out and put up fresh drywall, back to normal wall status

joecaption 05-30-2012 06:56 AM

I'm with Dave on this one.
Simple DIY job to remove sheetrock and put back up.

Bonster 05-30-2012 11:17 AM

Thanks Joe (ComputerMagic) for the tip about the wallpaper. For some reason I was thinking the textured vinyl stuff would be more sturdy, not delicate. :mad:

Quote:

don't you think they'll be a PITA to keep clean
This is for an income property we're in the process of buying. I thought the panels would create a "Wow!" effect but didn't even think about cleaning 'em -- but that's a good point, Dave! If the tenants don't maintain (clean) the wall, it'll eventually look like crap.

Replacing the sheetrock seems like more work than covering it up, but that's why I'm asking about this here -- to get advice from folks who know what's involved!

Speaking of removing and putting back up -- is it possible to cut out the sheetrock, then turn it around and replace it with the other side (without the glue) facing the room? (If that sounds dumb, please be gentle... I'm a clueless blonde.) I'm guessing that taking the sheetrock out will damage it and make it "unreusable," but figured it couldn't hurt to ask.

Thank you, guys!

ThatDaveGuy 05-30-2012 12:17 PM

I understand the "what's the easiest way?" reflex, but seriously, drywall isn't that difficult, and in the long run will probably be the most cost-effective and give the best results.

I have the same problem in our house, some dingbat wall project from owners past left the drywall wrecked with glue and nail holes. Replacing it was the only good choice, plus having the walls open allowed me to rewire/add outlets and insulate exterior walls.

Ask around, I'd be willing to bet someone in your circle of friends has experience with sheetrock to lend a hand and advice.

Bonster 05-30-2012 12:25 PM

Thanks Dave!

This is an exterior wall of what used to be a garage... it probably does need insulation!

hand drive 09-27-2012 09:17 AM

Depending on how much wall space there is another option is to sand down the high spots of the rough wall and put a skim coat of drywall mud on the wall. Tearing down and replacing the entire drywall entails dealing with the other walls where the torn down wall meets them in the corners. In other words you will most likely have to paint three walls instead of just the one wall that the drywall was replaced because the new inside corner will need drywall mud that spreads out to both walls.

notmrjohn 09-27-2012 10:42 AM

" cut out the sheetrock, then turn it around" As gently as I can, there is nothing gentle about taking out drywall. And the backside has a different paper face, rougher and softer, and edges aren't tapered for mud. Almost impossible to remove without damage. Usually you just knock a few holes in it and rip it off in chunks, Great for releaving pent up frustrations. New sheet rock easy to apply, taping and mudding not too hard. Dry wall man in and out in few hours not counting dry, but Diyer just spends lots more time.
I dunno what that 3-D wall is made of, looks fragile for rental property. And $100 to cover about 3 foot wide?

Depending on size, location, pattern of "globs" knock off, sand, scrape, Goof Off, etc really big ones, and break long linear patterns. Patch any exposed gypsum, missing tape, and holes. Prime coat wall, apply really heavy, tough, high relief texture, paint wall.

hand drive 09-27-2012 12:22 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by notmrjohn (Post 1018392)
" cut out the sheetrock, then turn it around" As gently as I can, there is nothing gentle about taking out drywall. And the backside has a different paper face, rougher and softer, and edges aren't tapered for mud. Almost impossible to remove without damage. Usually you just knock a few holes in it and rip it off in chunks, Great for releaving pent up frustrations. New sheet rock easy to apply, taping and mudding not too hard. Dry wall man in and out in few hours not counting dry, but Diyer just spends lots more time.
I dunno what that 3-D wall is made of, looks fragile for rental property. And $100 to cover about 3 foot wide?

Depending on size, location, pattern of "globs" knock off, sand, scrape, Goof Off, etc really big ones, and break long linear patterns. Patch any exposed gypsum, missing tape, and holes. Prime coat wall, apply really heavy, tough, high relief texture, paint wall.

Every wall in Texas has texture on it! Is that the solution to everything there? :wink:

notmrjohn 09-27-2012 04:07 PM

"Every wall in Texas......" It adds texture to our lives. Buut you may be right, especially in build um fast developments. Why spend time on tape and mud, one coat, its gonna be textured anyway. Thick pop corn ceilings too. If this wasn't rental, a multi-color glazed heavy texture job.

Last addition I built had walls, ceiling, smooth as glass, gloss white paint, couldn't see seam or screw patch one. Dry wall man was superior. spent over a week, twice a day, one maybe two hours morning and evening, he also panted. Massive hail storm punctured roof few months ago, severe rain damage. Took three weeks for that drywall man to have opening in schedule, even with owner offering bonus pay.


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