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Old 01-01-2012, 11:55 AM   #1
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I am doing research on wood stoves. My structure has a vaulted ceiling (16'). I have noticed that some wood stoves advertise that they work well with a high ceiling. what is the feature on the wood stove that accommodates this?
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Old 01-01-2012, 04:26 PM   #2
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The feature which you need is a ceiling fan or more likely a fleet of ceiling fans.
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Old 01-01-2012, 05:26 PM   #3
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Probably an integrated fan?
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Old 01-01-2012, 06:25 PM   #4
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All wood stove manufacturers like to advertise that their wood stoves incorporate "improved", "revolutionary", "super efficient", you name it features. Fact is they all burn wood, and they all have to meet EPA standards, at least if they are legitimate products. The only way I know of to meet EPA standards is to incorporate either a secondary air burner, or a catalytic converter, neither of which improves overall efficiency, but they do reduce soot and smoke emissions.

I happen to have a Jotul, pretty expensive, nicely made, probably last 30 years or more. It comes with a built in blower, which would not do you much good with 16 foot ceilings, as previously noted you need a big ceiling fan, maybe a Big Ass Fan (that is a company, they make large fans, I don't have one but then again I don't have 16 foot ceilings).

The physics of burning wood constrains efficiency. As long as you have an airtight, and virtually all stoves these days are airtight, you cannot get much more than 40 percent overall efficiency, I don't care what the manufacturers say. So take your pick, there are lots of good stoves out there, generally you pay a lot more for a well known name brand that is built to last, but I have never seen one that actually has any special features that would make it work better with 16 foot ceilings than another, except some have a little bigger fan than others.
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Old 01-01-2012, 06:32 PM   #5
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Do you also have a source of free or cheap hardwood, a place to store it that's not right up againt the house so as not to attract termites? And no a garage does not count unless you want to start bringing bugs in that close to the house.
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Old 01-01-2012, 07:52 PM   #6
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My studio has 12' high walls (6" studs) with a vaulted ceiling, the highest point (middle) is 16'. Pitch is 10x12. The structure is 24x36' with a half loft. I have not put pluming, electrical or insulation in yet (i am taking my sweet time). It has awesome cedar siding and I stained every board with sickens (in between rain storms). What would be a good size wood stove to get? I live in Northern Minnesota with a hefty supply of firewood in plain view. My brother just gave me an appreciated lecture on the value of having a wood-shed (near future project). Also my structure is set up with radiant floor heating (its on a concrete slab). do I need to build up the area under the stove? I was thinking I may just need to lay ceramic tile.
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Old 01-01-2012, 08:56 PM   #7
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Your numbers don't make sense. If you have 12-ft walls and a 10/12 roof, the highest point would be a lot higher than 16 ft. But in any case, you should consult a wood stove dealer in your area to determine the proper size of stove to get.
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Old 01-01-2012, 09:25 PM   #8
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I was born around Redwing, MN. I still speak Minnesotan. At times.

I agree. Your numbers make no sense.

And are you approaching the concept of wood stove cooking and heating from a not well thought, insurable, and practical standpoint?

You do plan to chimney or otherwise vent this thing right? I am thinking inspectors and permits are in your future.

Last edited by user1007; 01-01-2012 at 09:34 PM.
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Old 01-01-2012, 09:29 PM   #9
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Yes I have an appointment for later this month. I just like information. thanks for your time, I will get my tape measure out again. the roof pitch is 10x12 the trusses are vaulted, maybe that is why its not making sense, or maybe the 16' was where the wood stove pipe was exiting the structure. I have dealt with a few frustrated carpenters. My project is unique. I need the high point because I paint murals and sometimes they are that tall. I will be creating a frame (wood) then apply canvas then paint then detach the canvas, roll it up and deliver.
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Old 01-01-2012, 09:46 PM   #10
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You can have a small fire in a big stove. If you want to combine the thing with your radiant heat, you may get one of those US Stove jobs sold at the big box stores as add-on forced air furnaces. Get one with a water sleeve to run your radiant. You can still run the blower on it. This might be a good combination. At the beginning and end of the season, you can just fire the thing up and not bother with the radiant. Your radiant may take hours or days to fully get cooking depending on your heat sink.

There are also outside furnaces which you may look into. I think they may even manufacture some up there.

Sounds like a great project. Everyone likes to have their own studio/workshop like you have.
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Old 01-01-2012, 09:52 PM   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by studio_arts View Post
Yes I have an appointment for later this month. I just like information. thanks for your time, I will get my tape measure out again. the roof pitch is 10x12 the trusses are vaulted, maybe that is why its not making sense, or maybe the 16' was where the wood stove pipe was exiting the structure. I have dealt with a few frustrated carpenters. My project is unique. I need the high point because I paint murals and sometimes they are that tall. I will be creating a frame (wood) then apply canvas then paint then detach the canvas, roll it up and deliver.
I've worked with galleries all my life and can deal with most artists.

I hope you are painting acrylics in this environment? Not oils around a woodburning stove? Even with acrylics you are not going to have these tapestries flowing around burning flames right? I am not asking if you are an idiot, just wondering if you could be a distracted artist.

And just maybe I may have an ex in my past that is one of handful of international art critics respected. She became the first director of education for a certain US museum that had the courage to build a space for oversized pieces. In Spain as it turns out.

I respect you for what you are attempting. As real artist? You must respect that your place of translation needs to be mobile or all you have tried will be chalked up to madness.

Dare send photos of the sketches and space?
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Old 01-01-2012, 10:18 PM   #12
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If I can figure out how to attach a photo on this site within a reasonable amount of time, I will. I would rather work with oils but the drying time is always a factor plus the fumes are unhealthy, so I paint using oils outside. For Interior murals and paintings inside my (partially finished) studio I use acrylic. I build the walls for the canvas out of plywood and smooth out the gaps (where the boards meet) with plaster, then sand it smooth. It would be great to be able to use my studio during the colder months since in Northern Minnesota that is at least half the year. Sometimes I am an idiot, or at least my posts on DIY make me sound like one, I need to get my information straight before asking a question. I uploaded art, I will need to do some searching for my studio pics.
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Old 01-01-2012, 11:52 PM   #13
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I would vote that you give consideration to a gasification boiler, as I suspect you are going to need some btu's in your neck of the woods. THE FIRST thing you need to do is a heat loss analysis. You can do this yourself very easily, using one of the online calculators. Once you know your heat loss, you will know what btu boiler to use. It ain't rocket science, and sizing is not as critical, IMO, with a gasification boiler and a storage tank. You'll run whatever size you have a WOT until you heat your storage tank, then heat off of it. A great place to read is hearth.com; that is what they do there, and guys/gals will post their entire schematics, etc. Radiant floor heat? If not in the floor, you can still install it in the walls and (perhaps) the ceiling. Also, if it is not too late, give thought to more insulation all around, and read about insulation other than fiberglass batts, if you are not boned up on that, too. Good luck w/ the shop!
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Old 01-02-2012, 05:39 AM   #14
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Quote:
Also my structure is set up with radiant floor heating (its on a concrete slab).
Ayuh,.... So put in an outdoor wood boiler,....

You can keep the wood, bark, mud, 'n bugs, Outdoors...
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Old 01-02-2012, 08:31 AM   #15
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An outdoor wood boiler is fine if you have the house heating set up for hot water, and you want to fire the beast up in the winter while going outside. If you just want a wood stove that produces hot air, there are all sorts of models out there. There are cast iron, ceramic, plate steel etc. Go to a local dealer and discuss the pros and cons, or check out some of the on line heating forums for some interesting discussion.

I bought a wood stove about three years ago, as I mentioned it was a Jotul, which is on the more expensive end. I got it because it was good looking, and seemed to be well made, and should last. Not for the efficiency, which as I stated is not going to vary much from stove to stove. We looked at a lot of models, some cast iron, some plate steel, some ceramic, you should do the same. We also looked at pellet stoves, but decided against them because of the relatively high cost of pellets vs. solid wood, and there was a pellet shortage that year.

I purchase whole trees by the grapple load. Two years ago I split nine cords by hand with a maul, I don't recommend it, but I was not travelling much at work that year, so I thought the exercise would do me good. A log splitter might be a better plan. I do enjoy heating with wood, very pleasant to look at the fire, so you may want to consider purchasing a stove with a large glass (actually most of them are ceramic) front so you can look at the flames, if that is important to you.
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