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-   -   Wood Shed Construction- Town wants concrete pad? (http://www.diychatroom.com/f19/wood-shed-construction-town-wants-concrete-pad-75545/)

TJ_in_IL 07-06-2010 03:39 PM

Wood Shed Construction- Town wants concrete pad?
 
I am interested in building a shed kit from the local big box store. The town wants it built on a 4" thick concrete pad, so that the wood floor does not cause a fire hazzard (soaking up gas). A metal floor shed or plastic shed is ok without. I am in the process of fighting this, and seeing if I can still get the wood shed and line the floor with FRP (Fiberglass Reinforced Panel), which meets IBC and BOCA codes for fire resistive material.
My argument is this... the shed costs me $400, the 8 x12 concrete pad will be 2-3x that. A plastic shed is crap. Not secure, warps and falls apart in a few years, and metal will rust. I can provide photos to the building department of Village Trustee's own plastic sheds that are falling apart, and held together with rope, duct tape and tarps.
Am I wrong in the argument against the concrete pad? Any advise or input appreciated.

TJ

oh'mike 07-06-2010 03:48 PM

Good luck:laughing:

Sorry to say this but you are tilting at windmills here.

Codes are written by politicians.

You are hoping to use logic and common sense.(this is our government)

This is Illinois.:whistling2:-----Mike----

Troglodyte 07-06-2010 03:51 PM

You may not wrong in your argument that the plastic sheds are crap. But that isn't what they are saying either. They are saying wood floors are a fire hazard, whether or not plastic sheds are crap is irrelevent.

I would definitely ask them if you can lay down a fire resistant floor to bypass the concrete pad if you don't want that pad, the worst they can do is turn you down.

You could also ask them if you could have a cinder block edge for the structure to sit on, with crushed compacted gravel as a floor.

TJ_in_IL 07-06-2010 03:59 PM

as quoted from the code:
"Sheds and other accessory structures, other than garages and other buildings designed to house or store motor vehicles, shall be soundly constructed upon four-inch thick concrete pads cushioned on a compacted gravel base of not less than four inches thick, unless the floor of a shed shall be an integrated structural component of a pre-fabricated shed, in which case the floor shall be constructed of structural plastic, structural steel or fiberglass so that it cannot absorb and retain gasoline or other flammable materials and thereby increase the risk of fire or explosion. No shed or other accessory structure shall be constructed or maintained with a dirt or gravel floor."

gmhammes 07-06-2010 04:09 PM

Interesting... In my neighborhood, everyone has wood sheds and i am pretty NONE of them have slabs down for them. In fact i just saw 2 delivered the other day with booms and no concrete was poured.

Willie T 07-06-2010 05:09 PM

1 Attachment(s)
Yep. You just might be doing this.....

Tom Struble 07-06-2010 05:21 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by TJ_in_IL (Post 466072)
as quoted from the code:
"Sheds and other accessory structures, other than garages and other buildings designed to house or store motor vehicles, shall be soundly constructed upon four-inch thick concrete pads cushioned on a compacted gravel base of not less than four inches thick, unless the floor of a shed shall be an integrated structural component of a pre-fabricated shed, in which case the floor shall be constructed of structural plastic, structural steel or fiberglass so that it cannot absorb and retain gasoline or other flammable materials and thereby increase the risk of fire or explosion. No shed or other accessory structure shall be constructed or maintained with a dirt or gravel floor."


i did not know about the gravel floor:huh:

bob22 07-06-2010 07:24 PM

My town wants to have all sheds anchored to the ground. I had to send them an email with a picture of the concrete anchors I was going to use to see if they were acceptable. For fun, ask them how much up-force the anchors have to be able to withstand. That gets them in a tizzy.

TJ_in_IL 07-06-2010 07:32 PM

Well, it looks like I will be going in front of the board for a variance to the code, based on the points I made to them. They said that I could not use the FRP because it is not an integral part of the structure. I sent them a copy of the specs for the shed, showing the wood floor is part of the truss system, and removal would take a re-engineering of the structure, plus the cost of the pad. I also asked how this is different than any of the other sheds that were recently constructed in town, or asked if I would have to construct a plastic shed, just like one that a Village Trustee has falling down. That is when they suggested the variance request. Wish me luck. TJ

joed 07-06-2010 08:15 PM

Your talking Illinois. They still enforce use of conduit for ALL electrical in Chicago.

gmhammes 07-07-2010 09:55 AM

Good luck!

forresth 07-08-2010 09:19 PM

so is gravel OK for a garage?. toss in a cheap motorbike if it is.

I think I'd buy or build a trailer before going through all that crap, then pull off the axle , for storage wouldn't want the springs to sag or the tires to flatspot) after it gets registerd. :whistling2:

concretemasonry 07-08-2010 10:20 PM

Construction requirements and other limitations are becoming more common because of the recent history of small sheds falling apart or being blown into other structures (especially in tornado prone locations). The local requirement can always trump a minimal state code, which is nothing new since a local code must have minimal requirements the same as a state code but are allowed to be more strict. Local zoning has always controlled the land use and type/size of structures. Even municipalities are recognizing that being cheap is not too smart and standards are being tightened.

Some of requirements of being satisfactorily anchored are becoming more common and the code requirements are being applied for a smaller footprint than previously. At one time 144 sf was a common limit but history has caused this to being reduced to 120 or 96 sf in many areas. I know of an area where the limit was 120 sf, so people went to from 8' high to 10' high because the cost increase was minimal in comparison to the utility being increased. - Now there is a height limitation because of the increased height exposed to the wind.

You may not think a small shed on gravel is just fine until your neighbors hits your home broadside. Then it is between you insurance company (and future premiums) against the neighbor's insurance or worse yet it is an act of God where nobody wins since God has never been served or lost a case.

Dick

BigGuy01 07-15-2011 01:11 PM

Cost of sand, gravel, and bags of cement... and then some rebar if you really want it to last quite some time, will only cost you around $200 for that large of a pad. If not cheaper.

1 part gravel for 2 parts of sand, and one part cement. Add water to proper consistancy, you have concrete. :thumbsup:

vsheetz 07-15-2011 02:02 PM

Agree - the cost to do the concrete pad should not be that high. If I were building a nice shed, I would put it on a concrete pad anyway. The time and effort to fight this could be redirected and probably better utilized to creating the concrete slab.

IMHO..


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