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Old 07-24-2011, 10:06 AM   #16
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Wood panel to concrete block wall


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Originally Posted by jschaben View Post
Not really. Accomplishes your immediate need, apparently with in the budget you have to work with.


1x4's should work fine. No evidence of moisture with the moisture test so I see no need for pressure treated. I don't quite understand a labor differential for using furring strips


No recommendation. I'm not familiar with powered concrete nailers. I'm thinking 1-1/4 to 1-1/2" long. Furring strip is 3/4 and the block webbing is about the same I believe.

No problem here. I'd just nail, not glue the panelling so if you want to upgrade the area later you can fairly easily pull the panelling off and do what needs to be done then reinstall the panelling.
JS, AG said you would need to put plastic behind the furring strips. That is where I thought the additional labor would come from. Also, even though I did the moisture test, I think I'd feel more comfy using pressure treated wood which I don't think they do for concrete strips. Again, I also didn't see much of a price difference online. If I go to HD and see a HUGE price difference, I will consider going with the furring strips.

Gary:

1. Atlanta, GA

2. Solid Wood paneling. I'm not sure what kind of wood, painted. It's less than a half an inch thick, either 1/8 or 1/16. My contractor said its expensive and good paneling.

3. The interior drainage system, as far as I understand it, is that about 1-2 feet were drilled out of the edges of the foundation, gravel was put in surrounded with corrugated plastic pipe which channels the water outside. Our lot is sloped right to left, so it's gravity based.

4. Yes. The furnace is in the basement in a paneled off room just like the panel we are now going to use. The ac unit is outside.

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Old 07-24-2011, 01:10 PM   #17
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Wood panel to concrete block wall


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Originally Posted by sgold33 View Post
JS, AG said you would need to put plastic behind the furring strips. That is where I thought the additional labor would come from. Also, even though I did the moisture test, I think I'd feel more comfy using pressure treated wood which I don't think they do for concrete strips. Again, I also didn't see much of a price difference online. If I go to HD and see a HUGE price difference, I will consider going with the furring strips.

Gary:

1. Atlanta, GA

2. Solid Wood paneling. I'm not sure what kind of wood, painted. It's less than a half an inch thick, either 1/8 or 1/16. My contractor said its expensive and good paneling.

3. The interior drainage system, as far as I understand it, is that about 1-2 feet were drilled out of the edges of the foundation, gravel was put in surrounded with corrugated plastic pipe which channels the water outside. Our lot is sloped right to left, so it's gravity based.

4. Yes. The furnace is in the basement in a paneled off room just like the panel we are now going to use. The ac unit is outside.

Sounds like you have a first class moisture control system. Personally, I don't fhink you really need pressure treated but if you're more comfortable with it, do it by all means. Won't hurt anything either. Good Luck
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Old 07-24-2011, 05:51 PM   #18
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Wood panel to concrete block wall


The foam on the wall is to prevent conditioned basement air from reaching the colder concrete wall and slowly release any moisture to dry to the inside wicking/or vapor through the concrete from the ground. With your system, the latter one is prevented. I would make sure to air seal the paneling to prevent air passing there, pp. 8: http://www.buildingscience.com/docum...lation-systems

You will get convective loops without insulation in the air space behind the wood (3/4”): http://joneakes.com/jons-fixit-database/743

Air seal the bottom and top horizontal 1x’s from the floor slab and ceiling framing. Insulate the rim joists. http://www.buildingscience.com/docum...m-at-rim-joist

Use a sill sealer for a capillary/thermal/air break on the slab. Seal all joints in the paneling; hold it ½” up from the slab. http://www.buildingscience.com/docum...wall-approach/

Code requires an accepted v.b. between the concrete and wood furring, or p.t. wood; #7: http://publicecodes.citation.com/ico...9_3_sec017.htm
P.t wood is not waterproof, (be sure to use the proper fasteners)and will have fastener air/vapor leakage points through the Drylock, to what extent is unknown. (Which I would water-proof and add a strip of sill sealer behind to prevent a heat sink directly to the cold concrete) http://www.greenbuildingadvisor.com/...-building-code
http://bct.eco.umass.edu/publication...ns-about-wood/
Air tight is good as it’s required every 10’ across the wall and top and bottom against fire, anyway; http://publicecodes.citation.com/ico...9_3_sec002.htm
I can’t tell if you are in Zone 3 or 4 for your basement insulation requirements: http://publicecodes.citation.com/ico...001_par001.htm
Zone 3= R-5 is suggested, not required- footnote “f”: http://publicecodes.citation.com/ico..._11_sec002.htm
Check with your local AHJ on the furnace supply air (outside or adj. room supplied) to an enclosed room, if gas.
Gary
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Old 07-24-2011, 09:08 PM   #19
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Wood panel to concrete block wall


If you are going to follow the link (GBR) with the air sealing for convective currents then you had best ensure you have no moisture there. Those convective currents are what keep the system dry as stagnant moisture in a cavity may not turn out well for the wood paneling.
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Old 07-28-2011, 10:57 PM   #20
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Wood panel to concrete block wall


Finished walls require fire-blocking at the ceiling level, as do any chases. Every 10' horizontally as well. Do not leave a gap for basement air to "circulate" in a closed wall or ceiling--- against basement fire-codes. The convective loop links showed insulation is needed even with "still" air in a stud bay - even 3/4" deep.

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Old 07-29-2011, 09:54 AM   #21
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Wood panel to concrete block wall


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Finished walls require fire-blocking at the ceiling level, as do any chases. Every 10' horizontally as well. Do not leave a gap for basement air to "circulate" in a closed wall or ceiling--- against basement fire-codes. The convective loop links showed insulation is needed even with "still" air in a stud bay - even 3/4" deep.

Gary
The air space I spoke of would be on the interior side of the insulation, not the exterior. You can fire block the floor joists and allow the wall to breath at the top and bottom. I couldn't find in the code where an air cavity in a wall is against fire code. Wouldn't that make every stud wall in existence against code?
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Old 07-29-2011, 10:04 AM   #22
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Wood panel to concrete block wall


Gray: Typical existing home structure
Pink: Batt or foam insulation at rim joist
Blue: Rigid Foam
Brown: Studs, base trim, and fire blocking
yellow: GWB or alternative finish material

Note the slight gap at the base trim (1/2" max.) and the gap at the corner of the gwb. This allows for air movement within the cavity space. The gap in the gwb could be done with j-channel terminations or a type of vent strip. There is no vapor barrier in this design and the foam would act as a vapor retarder due to its inherent vapor resistance (1.5 perms at 1" [R-5], .75 perms at 2" [R-10]) DOW XPS: http://msdssearch.dow.com/PublishedL...romPage=GetDoc

If you find a part of this to be against code, please let me know which code and relative section. If you feel there is fault elsewhere in this design, I'm all ears.
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Old 07-30-2011, 11:14 AM   #23
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Wood panel to concrete block wall


No openings in fire-barrier wall or ceiling for wood framed structure; http://publicecodes.citation.com/ico...002_par031.htm


You need a full (no holes or slots) thermal barrier (for fire) over the foam board: http://publicecodes.citation.com/ico...016_par003.htm

In renovations, wood paneling even has a “flame spread or smoke” rating, follow the blue high-lighted links: http://publicecodes.citation.com/ico...008_par002.htm
Interior wall covering minimums; http://publicecodes.citation.com/ico...002_par017.htm


Not Code, but good building practice: no fiberglass at rims to let the air inside, needs SPF or rigid w. canned-foam joints; http://www.buildingscience.com/docum...-at-rim-joist/
Notice the “sealant, adhesive or gasket” at the ceiling/top plate joint and the drywall/plates joints at bottom and top of wall, inside, fig. #10: http://www.buildingscience.com/docum...ts?full_view=1
Notice the foam board on top the concrete stem wall, next to the mud sill for insulation and “draftstop”. ADA approach from BSC, to keep indoor air from reaching concrete walls: http://www.buildingscience.com/docum...wall-approach/


OP, you may need 3/8" minimum drywall under the paneling if under 1/4" thickness, as sited in this post.


Gary

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