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Old 08-22-2009, 01:37 PM   #1
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Wood is exposed


We are getting a house built and just recently had the roof put on. The roof system is a simple metal with a double foil bubble wrap under that. My problem is I dont believe we should be able to see the wood (see pictures) down around where the gutters are to be installed. If Im wrong please tell me but shouldnt there have been some flashing material or extended the foil wrap down over the boards before they covered the fascia board ?
Im thinking when the gutters are installed and rain is falling and splashing then the boards will get soaked.




Last edited by Mudball; 08-22-2009 at 01:41 PM.
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Old 08-22-2009, 01:44 PM   #2
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Wood is exposed


I've always seen drip edge on roofs to cover the edge of the roof decking
It then extends down onto the facia board
At least on asphalt roofs

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Old 08-22-2009, 02:35 PM   #3
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Wood is exposed


You had pole barn steel put on a home?
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Old 08-22-2009, 02:46 PM   #4
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Wood is exposed


Thanks Scuba Dave I believe it should be covered as well.
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Old 08-22-2009, 07:32 PM   #5
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Wood is exposed


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You had pole barn steel put on a home?
Steel roofs are becoming more and more common on homes. They last much longer than their asphalt cousins and are also more energy efficient and all around more "green". It really just makes sense.

To answer the original question, yes there should definitely be drip edge installed there. That would is not treated lumber and will rot faster than a brick of cheese on your counter.
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Old 08-23-2009, 05:31 AM   #6
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Wood is exposed


That sounds great. I will be getting with the builder and they will need to get that fixed. Thanks.
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Old 08-23-2009, 08:09 AM   #7
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Wood is exposed


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Steel roofs are becoming more and more common on homes. They last much longer than their asphalt cousins and are also more energy efficient and all around more "green". It really just makes sense.
Actually they don't. With a lifetime asphalt shingle, you have a better warranty than steel.
Steel only has a warranty on the paint.

Pole barns are banned in certain areas around here because of their looks. It amazes me that people will put it on a home.

Energy efficient is BS also because steel transfers heat and shingles don't. I put on this exact same steel, even the same color on a pole barn a few weeks ago. It was VERY hot.

Don't believe everything the media tells ya.
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Old 08-23-2009, 10:16 AM   #8
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Wood is exposed


the steel heats up quickly but they cool quickly also

im not a big believer in exposed fastener roofs on houses

there should a drip edge and a foam closure at the eves
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Old 08-23-2009, 10:50 AM   #9
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Wood is exposed


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Energy efficient is BS also because steel transfers heat and shingles don't. I put on this exact same steel, even the same color on a pole barn a few weeks ago. It was VERY hot.
Asphalt doesn't transfer heat?
Since when?
I know my asphalt roof is hot as heck in direct Southern sun
And the plywood deck underneath is also very hot
Where is all the heat coming from that flows up the rafter vents??

I'm not sure which is more green or energy efficient
Asphalt uses oil bases poducts
But steel takes a lot of energy to make also
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Old 08-23-2009, 11:30 AM   #10
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Wood is exposed


Take up a shingles and feel under it. It's as cool as the air temperature. If everything is working correct, your attic, sheathing, should be close to the air temp outside. Heat builds up because it is an enclosed area with no insulation. The shingles have little effect. The "white shingle" idea by the P-BO paid professor is pure BS.....except that a white roof will reflect heat a little better. Really has more to do with the granules and mat, than the color.

Even I&W will keep it's form if it's not exposed to extreme temps before the shingles are laid. When you come across I&W that boils and sticks to the shingles, it's because it's either too hot in the attic or the I&W itself got too hot before the shingles were laid. We try not to do roofs when the temps get in the 90's. The best roof is actually put on in cold temps...just warm enough/sunny enough to seal the shingles.

You can do the same with a road. When the bust up the tar, the ground underneath is cool.
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Old 08-23-2009, 11:35 AM   #11
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Wood is exposed


Shingles in the sun are hot, top & bottom
I have felt them

My white roof is much cooler then the dark colored roof
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Old 08-23-2009, 11:40 AM   #12
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Wood is exposed


Go feel the underlayment and sheathing under them...... They heat up fast in the sun, so you have to be quick
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Old 08-24-2009, 12:54 AM   #13
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Wood is exposed


To the OP's orginal question -

Yes, there should be a drip edge - and I would suggest one should be used that extends several inches over the roof, not just a inch or so. Costs just a bit more, provides better protection.

And I would suggest there should be bird stop installed as well - this to keep birds and bugs from entering the openings at the edge of the roof created by the raised areas of the panels. The bird stop will match the contour of the metal roof.

I would be very wary of whoever installed this roofing... IMHO.
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Old 08-25-2009, 12:12 PM   #14
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Wood is exposed


It's too late for Mudball since he already paid the big bucks for his steel roof install but for all others thinking about using pole building steel with gasketed nails for their house - DON'T

Leaks around those nails are a common problem. For a pole building it's not a big deal. For a house it is a big deal. If you are going to put a steel roof on your house put on one designed for a house that won't leak.

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