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Old 02-12-2011, 12:23 AM   #31
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Windows Leaking Nightmare


Here in So. Cal there are not many that install a head flashing for vinyl windows. I'm, not saying that you should not but I think that if properly flashed with *****ethane or something equivalent you should be O.K.

I do however like to install a sill pan as Tom said previously. If it is new construction you can install the pan so that it lets moisture slip between the stucco and the Grade 'D' paper (two layers). If retrofitted which is what I assume than just as Tom said is spot on.
I have some special tricks I personally like to use when installing retro vinyl windows.

Andy.

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Old 02-12-2011, 12:43 AM   #32
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deeonline, I merged your threads to give prior info posted and pictures....

Page #8 for a good head flashing; http://www.mtcc1170.com/images/BCRainScreen.pdf

Gary
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Old 02-12-2011, 08:28 AM   #33
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Thanks for keeping us updated.. If you have a chance, post some pictures of what you find when you remove some additional stucco and a window, and we may have some additional suggestions.
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Old 02-12-2011, 12:28 PM   #34
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The posters on this thread know more about stucco than I ever will. From what I've read here though, it sounds like this was constructed improper from day one. As such it's hard to believe that this problem has manifested itself in just the last five months, since your purchase. I think the previous owners would have to have been fully aware of the situation and failed to disclose the information. IMHO, you may very well have legal recourse to require the seller to effect proper repairs.
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Old 02-12-2011, 07:14 PM   #35
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Did you check the joints in the parapet above the windows?
If there are no "standing S joints" or something to prevent water from syphoning into the parapet metal joints, the water will wick into the parapet, down the wall, and into window frames.
No amount of caulking will permanently cure it, the metal joints move and expand too much.
Water will climb 1/2 inches to syphon behind a metal joint or cracked caulking.
Wind will make the water "climb" even higher.
If the parapet is good, you may have to go to a "rain screen" system with a drainage plane behind the masonary stucco.
Good luck.
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Old 02-12-2011, 07:19 PM   #36
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Also, I don't recommend elastomeric coatings.
They make a vapor barrier on the outside skin of the building, and cause condensation in the cold weather. It's ok to have the vapor barrier on the outside only in climates where it is never cold outside, but air conditioning is used extensively inside, so the cold side of the wall is always inside.
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Old 02-13-2011, 11:06 AM   #37
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Thanks tomstruble. I am going to be making a beveled sill with a back dam to guide the water outside. As far as the WRB goes, I'll be using liquid WRB from StoCorp (Sto GoldCoat) instead of paper.
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Old 02-13-2011, 11:15 AM   #38
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GBR in WA View Post
deeonline, I merged your threads to give prior info posted and pictures....

Page #8 for a good head flashing; http://www.mtcc1170.com/images/BCRainScreen.pdf

Gary
Hi Gary. I was under impression that I need a separate thread for a different question. Not sure why my thread about Head Flashing got merged into my original thread re: leaking windows. Is it because they are somewhat related? In my opinion it would be much more clear to everyone to keep these topics separately. If you could please shed some light on the forum policy I would very much appreciate it. I want to make sure I stay compliant with it. Thanks!
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Old 02-13-2011, 05:17 PM   #39
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Just wanted to make sure that you are aware that GoldCoat is intended to be used as part of Sto's StoGuard system, not as a stand alone WRB, and also that the system does not have code approval in all areas.
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Old 02-13-2011, 10:52 PM   #40
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Michael Thomas View Post
Just wanted to make sure that you are aware that GoldCoat is intended to be used as part of Sto's StoGuard system, not as a stand alone WRB, and also that the system does not have code approval in all areas.
Thanks for the heads-up, Michael. Yes, I will be using the Sto GoldCoat as part of the Sto PowerWall NExt system and this system does have approval from city of Los Angeles (thank god, for a change I see something approved here). I like Sto's approach much better than re-wrapping the house in paper again. I am also going to be using a 3/16 drainage mat to create necessary bond breaker between the WRB and the stucco. I think it's going to come out really nice.
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Old 02-13-2011, 11:11 PM   #41
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Originally Posted by JKosiki View Post
Also, I don't recommend elastomeric coatings.
They make a vapor barrier on the outside skin of the building, and cause condensation in the cold weather. It's ok to have the vapor barrier on the outside only in climates where it is never cold outside, but air conditioning is used extensively inside, so the cold side of the wall is always inside.
There are elastomeric coatings that are water permeable which allow water vapor to escape from inside to outside and not the other way around. However, I do not like any coating except clear seal on top of finished stucco. I like the look of stucco as is.
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Old 02-13-2011, 11:44 PM   #42
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AndyGump View Post
Here in So. Cal there are not many that install a head flashing for vinyl windows. I'm, not saying that you should not but I think that if properly flashed with *****ethane or something equivalent you should be O.K.

I do however like to install a sill pan as Tom said previously. If it is new construction you can install the pan so that it lets moisture slip between the stucco and the Grade 'D' paper (two layers). If retrofitted which is what I assume than just as Tom said is spot on.
I have some special tricks I personally like to use when installing retro vinyl windows.

Andy.

We will need to see these ''tricks'' before you leave Andy

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