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Old 11-09-2010, 06:31 PM   #16
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Window stool and framing


I don't think they are very expensive. It's a lot of trouble to make them, 'cause usually they come with some sort of detail on the edge which looks nice. Just more work. Glad you have found a solution. good luck!

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Old 11-09-2010, 09:22 PM   #17
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Window stool and framing


Quote:
Originally Posted by Joe1. View Post
Oh just one last thing, does it pay to make the stool myself, since it's going to be flush and all? And if so, what size/kind wood would you use?
Joe
I'd say look for an off the shelf piece you like first. If you can't find one then make your own. To make your own you'll need some tools though. In making mine I use a table saw, miter saw, jig saw, and a router. It is possible to make my stool without a router. I only use it to round off an edge which I have done with a sander but the router gives a more even profile in less time.

I know home depot carries stool specifically notched to fit the 400 series windows. You can also buy 400 series extensions jam witch would have the notch already done and then you could rip to width and route whatever profile you want.
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Old 11-10-2010, 12:01 AM   #18
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Window stool and framing


Hi guys,

Thanks for the replies. I decided to buy a pre-made stool piece (9' long). It's a simple bull nose with a slight step at the bottom, so I can take a razer blade and cut the step and sand it to make the returns pretty easily. It's just a generic stool from a mill shop, so there's no notch to fit into the dado or anything.

The only thing is I'm not crazy about the thickness of it, it's a 5/8 piece. I figured this size would be okay, as my casings are only 3/4 thick at their ends and 2.5 inches wide (the dormers are pretty small, so there's not much width to deal with). Anyway, when I tried to put one up today, using some 2x4 blocks temporarily, I had trouble keeping the stool from getting out of alignment. It kept tilting forward on me. I noticed that the bottom of the stool was resting in the middle of the dado on the 400 series windows, rather than resting on both sides of it. In other words, I set the reveal to be 3/16", so with the 5/8 stool, I can't straddle the dado on top and bottom and get a nice platform to butt up against. Am I supposed to leave a larger reveal on the bottom?

Moopey, how did you deal with the reveal on the 400's? How much reveal did you leave on the stool to window frame? I wanted to keep it the same all the way around, but if I drop it lower, the stool will cover the dado evenly, which should be better for nailing to the window, etc. Is it customary to leave the reveal larger on the bottom with these 400 series-style frames?

Joe

Last edited by Joe1.; 11-10-2010 at 12:04 AM.
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Old 11-10-2010, 12:33 AM   #19
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Window stool and framing


Moopey, looking again at your pictures, it looks like you did leave the reveal larger on the bottom. Is that the case? If so, is that the norm, or just personal preference?

Thanks,

Joe
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Old 11-10-2010, 10:12 AM   #20
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Window stool and framing


My stool for the 400 series had the back notched to fit in the dado. Because of this, I didn't choose what size reveal I wanted on the bottom. I chose a smaller reveal on the other sides just to match my other windows.

The nice thing about having the stool notched to fit in the dado is that it helps to keep the back aligned. To also aid in this, I usually install the stool and the apron at the same time. I first line up the stool and nail the wings on either side that over hang the wall. This keeps the stool from falling. I then position the apron and push it up underneath the stool with constant up pressure. Make sure the stool is where you want it and then put a couple nails in the apron. Once the apron is secure I nail the stool from the top down into apron. This usually secures the stool so if you were to pressure on the edge it shouldn't move.
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Old 11-10-2010, 03:32 PM   #21
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Window stool and framing


Yeah, the notch on the back must make it nicer to put in. But I called my local Home Depot, and the guy said they don't carry the made to fit sills anymore--whether he's correct or not, we just picked a generic up at our local mill shop.

I went with the 5/8 because the casings are only 2.5 inches wide, and the window and wall area itself is small. So I figured the 5/4 sill would be too thick. I don't know; I have it though now.

Anyway, Moopey, had you not gotten the stool you got, would you have simply matched the reveal to the side casings' reveal?

I've been going over this book online, and it shows (what seems to be) and 400 Anderson, and on the bottom it looks like he left a large reveal, almost 1/2 inch, and in the article itself he says he made the sill. Here's a link to the book: http://books.google.com/books?id=iEQ...casing&f=false

The window picture I'm refering to is on page 71.

How I'm installing mine is the way that guy did it, with 2x4 blocks to hold it up, as I may nail one or two up into the casing from underneath first. Or I may screw it up to the side casing.

I've heard that many toe nail into the window frame itself, but that makes me a little nervous. Did you do that, or only down into the stool and through the horns on the sides?

Joe
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Old 11-14-2010, 03:31 PM   #22
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I usually nail into the window. I try to avoid it if I can but sometimes its necessary. I usually use a shorter length nail when I do just to be safe.
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Old 11-15-2010, 06:36 AM   #23
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Hi, just thought I would mention that I just use curtain valances only with my blinds, I don't use the side panels. The valances cover the hardware at the top. I just have a regular curtain rod installed across the top piece of window trim, when you put the valance on over the blinds, all you see are the thin sides of the blinds. The thicker bottom piece on the blinds rest right above the window stool and doesn't stick out because the stool extends out farther.
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Old 11-21-2010, 10:35 PM   #24
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Window stool and framing


Hi guys,

Thanks for the replies. The window casings and stool/aprons are done. They came out pretty good. I had trouble keeping my stools dead flat, since I think the Anderson window frame is slightly angled (that guy in Home Depot who said they don't carry the premade stools better have been correct!). I was able to make them slightly straighter by cutting the bottom of the dado lip back a little, so they're flusher. I think this eased the angle, but the top area still had a slight angle.

I faced nailed upside down into the casings (a 6 and 4d nail on each side), toed four or so 4d nails into the window frame itself, and then I nailed a few 4d down into the apron. I used construction adhesive, plenty of it, on all the surfaces, so it is pretty sturdy feeling, even though with these windows the stool doesn't have much to rest on (my casing material not being very thick--customer's 1-minute decision). And with the angle of the stool, from being toe nailed into the slightly angled frame, there was a slight space between the stool and apron. So the glue helped make up for any of these little problems.

Anyway, maybe I'll get some pictures of the windows to show you guys.

Like I said the trim choice is not the best, and the stools should have been thicker (I put 5/8 bull-nosed), but it came out okay overall.

Now I'm onto the flooring.

Thanks again,

Joe
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Old 11-21-2010, 10:54 PM   #25
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Window stool and framing


Good to hear everything worked out ok. i'd like to see some photos when you get them.

-Derek-

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