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-   -   window into an existing wall (http://www.diychatroom.com/f19/window-into-existing-wall-130283/)

bamaranch 01-16-2012 07:45 PM

window into an existing wall
 
My new ambition is to insert a window into a currently long (23 feet) windowless wall. I'd like to put one of these numbers in there:

http://www.houzz.com/window-over-bed There's nothing good to look at thru there (which is why the original builders decided against it) but I think a high but long window like this would work well.

The question I have is: Gee, how on earth would I remove six feet of supportive studs. (A temporary support wall isn't an option as it's a vaulted ceiling.)

Any ideas appreciated. I'm stripping the skin off my exterior to put up new siding soon, and feel like the time is right.

coupe 01-16-2012 08:47 PM

I think if it was me, if I wanted that window in there? I'd build a 2x8 strong back or box beam and fasten it with lag bolts to ceiling joists as close to the eve as possible, then after tearing off exterior skin built a double 2x12 header wit 1/2 plywood sandwiched between, cut my opening and put king studs in with double jack studs holding it up. should carry the load.

jklingel 01-16-2012 09:00 PM

Do you have snow loads now, too? It would be advisable to get someone qualified to look at the place/span and calculate the size of header. Then, a temp support, like mentioned above, sounds good.

mae-ling 01-17-2012 12:30 AM

This can be very dangerous and if you are not an advanced diy person I would suggest you not try it yourself.


Here is how I Install a header when putting it into an existing wall.
1.Remove drywall in area window is to go, perhaps even from wall to wall if it is not too much wider as this gives a better ability to make it look right.
2. Put in King studs (full length)and trimmer studs (the ones to go under the edges of the header.)
3. Make up the header. Usually double 2x10 but does depend on your load.
4. Cut the nails top and bottom and pehaps the nails that hold on the sheeting on the studs that are where the header will go and turn them sideways, so they are flat against the outside sheeting. DO NOT REMOVE THEM!!!!!

As I understand your ceiling is vaulted Cut the studs off at the top height of the header one at a time and turn them sideways and shim them tight at the bottom plate.


5. Slip the header up into place and slide it in the amount it will go 2" on 2x4 studs 4" on 2x6 studs
6. Now remove the studs you turned sideways. You may need to cut them to get them out but usually they will come.
7. Push your beam all the way in and secure with nails or screws.
8. build the bottom of your opening.
9. cut out opening and whatever you need to do with whatever siding you have.
10. Re-drywall or patch.


Easier to do then explain.

woodworkbykirk 01-17-2012 09:28 PM

mai-ling is right. i was actually doing this today for 3 windows.

situationally the prep can change depending on if the wall has joists bearing on it plus a wall above it or just a floor ribbon and another floor.. if there are floor joists you will have to put up a temperary wall

when you go to cut the studs out so to allow for the new header i find its best to start the cut with a circular saw as this will help make the finish cut with a recip that much easier and straighter. however this is typically a little more involved and isnt really a diyer task

AndyGump 01-18-2012 01:53 AM

You state that it is a vaulted ceiling, that would mean that you have a ridge beam and that means that the gable end you want to put the window in is the load path for one end of the ridge beam.

You are going to have to be careful about sizing the header for this as it will probably have to be apart of the load path for the ridge.

Once you have determined the proper sized header, one way I have done this kind of work was to install a temp "header" above the location the permanent header will be.

Take off drywall to expose the work area inside.

I bolted a 2 x 12 through the siding on the outside into the studs just above the header location.

This can be done on the inside too.

Then I (no sh!t) cut the new window with header out with a chain saw, or you can use a sawz-all.

Install new header with all the proper kings and trimmers, casing and trim, drywall and siding.

Remove the temp header, works great.

Andy.

abracaboom 01-18-2012 03:12 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by mae-ling (Post 825354)
This can be very dangerous and if you are not an advanced diy person I would suggest you not try it yourself.


Here is how I Install a header when putting it into an existing wall.
1.Remove drywall in area window is to go, perhaps even from wall to wall if it is not too much wider as this gives a better ability to make it look right.
2. Put in King studs (full length)and trimmer studs (the ones to go under the edges of the header.)
3. Make up the header. Usually double 2x10 but does depend on your load.
4. Cut the nails top and bottom and pehaps the nails that hold on the sheeting on the studs that are where the header will go and turn them sideways, so they are flat against the outside sheeting. DO NOT REMOVE THEM!!!!!

As I understand your ceiling is vaulted Cut the studs off at the top height of the header one at a time and turn them sideways and shim them tight at the bottom plate.


5. Slip the header up into place and slide it in the amount it will go 2" on 2x4 studs 4" on 2x6 studs
6. Now remove the studs you turned sideways. You may need to cut them to get them out but usually they will come.
7. Push your beam all the way in and secure with nails or screws.
8. build the bottom of your opening.
9. cut out opening and whatever you need to do with whatever siding you have.
10. Re-drywall or patch.


Easier to do then explain.

Nice trick!

mae-ling 01-18-2012 08:18 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by AndyGump (Post 826489)
You state that it is a vaulted ceiling, that would mean that you have a ridge beam and that means that the gable end you want to put the window in is the load path for one end of the ridge beam.


Andy.

Good point! although not always true. Around here a lot of scissor trusses are used.

bamaranch 01-21-2012 09:00 AM

great ideas in here. Love your trick mae-ling.

PS - my ceiling is vaulted, but I'm not putting the window in the gable end (so it's not under the ridge beam load). The window is to go into one of the wide walls so there is much less load. Nevertheless, there is a load, the vaulted trusses without wall support would likely sag into the room (like a piece of paper folding around the ridge beam) if I ignore support needs.

I think mae-ling's idea could work.

Coupe, also valid idea. Unfortunately I have no eaves. One of the things I hate about my house is the no-eave colonial style it has. So as soon as you get to the exterior wall there's nothing but a gutter above it. Maybe an inch and a half of roof showing.

Gary in WA 01-21-2012 05:18 PM

I'd first check with your local building department, you may be in the 90-100mph wind frame for parts of Alabama;http://publicecodes.citation.com/ico...001_par004.htm

May require king stud/jack hold-downs against uplift, and header to top plates straps unless you dis/reassemble the plates, pp.12-16; http://www.awc.org/pdf/WFCM_90-B-Guide.pdf

Gary


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