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amakarevic 12-21-2011 10:45 PM

window installation in brick+framing wall
 
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my house wall is two layers of brick (roughly 9" thick) and the inside i have regular 2x4 framing with drywall. i just got a new window to install and replace an old one. the old setup was 100 yrs old with just a brick wall and then plaster directly on the brick. my window is 6.5" deep so, looking from the outside, i will have a 6.5" recession (9 brick + 4 framing/drywall - 6.5 window). all the how-to manuals instruct installing a window in a regular just framing rough opening. i was wondering if there are any good instruction manuals for doing this type of installation.

check the simple illustration

thanks

AGWhitehouse 12-21-2011 11:15 PM

Essentially you will be installing a "replacement" window. It should not have any flanges that are associated with "new construction" windows. Shim and anchor it within the wood framing and caulk the perimeter at the exterior to the brick. Ensure that the brick sill is sloped at least 15 degrees away from the window to shed any moisture from wind driven rains. It may be worth while to provide base flashing beneath the window to ensure water tightness if caulking is not installed properly or prematurely fails. Here's a video of a replacement. Notice he left the flange on, but note that the window is narrower than the brick opening allowing for the flanges to remain.

http://www.ronhazelton.com/projects/...n_a_brick_wall

amakarevic 12-22-2011 02:13 AM

thanks a bunch. do you think i can get away without reaching the window from the outside? i can reach out the window from the inside, with someone holding me maybe. but i cannot have proper access from the outside because it is on the 2nd floor but effectively 3rd floor because the ground under it is the patio for the basement (so basement, 1st floor and then this, and my 1st floor is almost 9 ft high). i can't access it with a ladder either because the patio is too narrow to set a ladder that high (would need a 30 ft ladder and the patio is only about 3 ft wide)

joecaption 12-22-2011 02:46 AM

That new window reall should have been ordered with a wider jam to make your install much easyer.
You did buy a new constrution flat jam window, right. A new constrution window will have a sloping sill on the outside.
It's far more important on this one to have the window sitting far enough outside so the sill is resting on the outside brick sill about 1" at least.
Your picture is showing it flush with the inside sheetrock, it does not have to be. Jam extentions can be made out of sheetrock or more commonly clear pine so the window can be further out.

AGWhitehouse 12-22-2011 07:23 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by amakarevic (Post 800116)
do you think i can get away without reaching the window from the outside?

Most definately. I recommend tying off to something solid though. Relying on the grip of a friend isn't near as safe as a rope tied to something solid. A 3-story fall will not be fun...

amakarevic 12-22-2011 05:41 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by joecaption (Post 800120)
It's far more important on this one to have the window sitting far enough outside so the sill is resting on the outside brick sill about 1" at least.
Your picture is showing it flush with the inside sheetrock, it does not have to be. Jam extentions can be made out of sheetrock or more commonly clear pine so the window can be further out.

Hmmm.... i'd like it to be flush with either outside or inside wall for the pure reason of simplicity and elegance -- also there is less work to be done making the transition to the recession on only one side than doing it from both sides. it seems a helluva lot easier making it flush with drywall inside and it be recessed into the brick on the outside.

thoughts?

thanks

joecaption 12-22-2011 05:49 PM

By doing it your way there's a real good chance of water getting in the wall causing all kind of problums.
Jam extentions are done all the time and most companys would have even made and shiped them with the window if you had of told them the wall thickness.

AGWhitehouse 12-22-2011 10:03 PM

amaka, what joe is trying to say, I think, is that the exterior face of the window should overhang the interior face of the brick by at least 1" to ensure proper caulking embeddment and adhesion which will ensure proper water mitigation. Here is a typical window in a brick wall section. http://www.maconline.org/tech/resdet4.jpg

note how the window sits on top of the brick just a little bit (minimum of 1").

amakarevic 12-24-2011 01:55 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by AGWhitehouse (Post 800851)
amaka, what joe is trying to say, I think, is that the exterior face of the window should overhang the interior face of the brick by at least 1" to ensure proper caulking embeddment and adhesion which will ensure proper water mitigation.

well i will have close to 2.5" of that overhand if the jamb is 6.5" and the inside of the window is flush with drywall. i say close and not equal (6.5-3.5-.05) because i am factoring in some small spacing between the brick and framing. does this make sense?

thanks

AGWhitehouse 12-24-2011 03:37 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by amakarevic (Post 802064)
well i will have close to 2.5" of that overhand if the jamb is 6.5" and the inside of the window is flush with drywall. i say close and not equal (6.5-3.5-.05) because i am factoring in some small spacing between the brick and framing. does this make sense?

thanks

Yes, Just try to make sure the window is supported by and anchored to the wood framing an not the brick veneer.


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