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-   -   window caulk (http://www.diychatroom.com/f19/window-caulk-14333/)

arichard21 12-12-2007 01:05 PM

window caulk
 
we had windows installed... just basic drop in replacments. now the caulking around them is cracked, and almost everyone is drafty. any idea why?

Sammy 12-12-2007 01:17 PM

Wrong caulk, too cold/wet etc.

Could be a few things.

Are they still under the installers warranty?

Cole 12-12-2007 01:41 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by kelly_b (Post 80094)
Just re-caulk?
Are you sure the the drafting problem is because of the cracked caulking and nothing some other source?

Bingo, I think you are onto something!

AtlanticWBConst. 12-12-2007 04:53 PM

If they are replacement windows (inserts), then it sounds like the wrong caulk was used....or maybe the windows are just plain Crap-Ola ?

kgphoto 12-12-2007 09:51 PM

Caulking is the last line of defense, not the primary. You got junk product installed in a junk manner.

kiwi54 12-12-2007 10:28 PM

Wow...three in a row.....cheap windows, cheap installation, cheap caulk. You better hope the warranty holds up... :whistling2: ...if you gotta draft, you gotta gap......one window, understandable, all windows, nu-uh.....call the folks that did you a huge favor by keeping your cost within budget.

arichard21 12-13-2007 06:23 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Sammy (Post 80093)
Wrong caulk, too cold/wet etc.

Could be a few things.

Are they still under the installers warranty?

yes, the contractor had to guarentee all his work for 1 year (it was paid for by a grant and that is their stipulation)

Quote:

Originally Posted by kelly_b (Post 80094)
Just re-caulk?
Are you sure the the drafting problem is because of the cracked caulking and nothing some other source?

Quote:

Originally Posted by kiwi54 (Post 80218)
Wow...three in a row.....cheap windows, cheap installation, cheap caulk. You better hope the warranty holds up... :whistling2: ...if you gotta draft, you gotta gap......one window, understandable, all windows, nu-uh.....call the folks that did you a huge favor by keeping your cost within budget.


well, i did some checking last night. not ALL of the windows are drafty, but alot are. and it seems that the ones that are drafty are the ones where the caulk has the biggest cracks in it. what else could i check for to determine if it is something else?

i do not know the quality of the windows, but i know they are NOT premuim grade. we had installed 2 of them a few years ago, and they are alot better quality then the ones the contractor put in.

Sammy 12-13-2007 07:34 AM

I would check all of your paperwork for a brand name or model number that might allow you to i.d. the window brand as far as quality. Some brands will have their name etched in the corner of the glass in real small letters.

Check the window frames to see if they are still tightly secured and the shases themsevles to see if you notice any obvious gaps from things lossening, out of square etc.

As previously stated, caulk is a last line of defense between you and the elements. It will only normally fail due to wrong type, poor installation [dirt water etc.] or too much movement for the caulk to take.

The main thing would be to pursue the warranty with the contractor while its still covered. Keep good notes with dates, times, items discussed, promised follow ups, etc in case things get ugly later.

kgphoto 12-13-2007 10:07 AM

Additionally, there really shouldn't be large gaps and the right amount and correct placement of fasteners should hold it tight to the building.

Basically slip in and glue windows are bad. There should be insulation in the spaces so even if there were gaps, air would have a hard time moving by.

Then there should be flashing that creates both air and water baffles to prevent air and water from getting buy and rotting your framing and siding.

If this was on stucco, it should have been ground down so it is a flat and parallel plane.

kiwi54 12-13-2007 05:14 PM

kgphoto is correct, in many cases when installing replacement windows, there may be gaps. You might now notice drafts you didn't have before. You do need insulation around all windows to cut down on draft. I usually use a canned, expanding foam insulation specially designed for doors and windows. I'm not suggesting you do this, I DO suggest you go back to the people who installed the windows, tell them the problem and have them inspect. Look for all of the items you have seen on this thread, insulation, flashing, water baffles and correct caulk. Have them rectify the situation.


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