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-   -   Will this header work? (http://www.diychatroom.com/f19/will-header-work-59149/)

sharp 12-13-2009 12:41 AM

Will this header work?
 
I opened a passage way and had some difficulties due to the age of the house and had to make some adjustments. Would like to know if what I did is stable.
On a load bearing wall which runs across the house I opened a passageway. The header is 48 1/2 " and I used 2 2x8 put on edge. The header goes up against the double top plate. No cripple studs. Is this OK.

The edges are on a single jack stud on either side. Is this OK or do I need a double jack?
The king studs are next to the jacks. The problem here is, the existing sole plate on either side could only fit the king studs. I have the jack studs sitting on the subfloor. Will this cause a problem as this is a load bearing wall and the jack studs are carrying the weight with no way to disperse the forces?

Thank you.

user1007 12-13-2009 02:53 AM

Wouldn't want structure for my house holding a bearing wall sitting on only a subfloor. You are playing with fire.

Bob Mariani 12-13-2009 05:20 AM

Is there a second floor that is being supported? If so these should be 2X10's. The single jack stud is okay but solid bearing under the king and jack stud must continue to the footing. This means that you need blocking or a continuous stud under the sole plate. The area between the floor joists must be filled, not allowing the subfloor to support the bearing wall alone.

sharp 12-13-2009 08:07 AM

Thanks. No problem with the 2X10.
I can get one of the jacks on the sole plate, however the other is in a corner by the staircase where to load bearing walls come together. I don't want to touch any thing in this corner. The previous sole plate was cut to the existing king stud. Can I put a 1 1/2 piece on the floor to run with the existing sole plate?
I don't understand what you mean by using the blocking in this situation.

Scuba_Dave 12-13-2009 08:41 AM

What is under the floor ?
Concrete pad ? In that case you have support
Crawl space ? In that case you need to go in the crawl space & see about support in that area down to foundation/support pier etc

MJW 12-13-2009 09:36 AM

Was there are permit pulled before this? I just ask because if it's inspected, you'll have to make sure it's right. We could probably help you much better with some pictures and a little more info.

sharp 12-13-2009 08:13 PM

Thanks for the help. The jack studs sitting on the subfloor are now supported with a sistered 2x4 between the subfloor and the beam running across the basement. Hope this works.
Also on the same header note...
I opened another passageway. This one is a 77". I used a sistered 2x10. This also sits on a single jack stand. This is on the sole plate on both sides.

Is the single jackstud enough for this span or should I use a double?
Thanks.

Gary in WA 12-15-2009 12:19 AM

As Bob said, use blocking the same thickness as the joists below for positive load transfer. An interior wall: http://ftp.resource.org/bsc.ca.gov/t...2_page0376.pdf Notice the NJ ---- number of jacks (trimmers or side supports).


Be safe, Gary

ClemS 12-15-2009 06:32 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by sharp (Post 366287)
Thanks for the help. The jack studs sitting on the subfloor are now supported with a sistered 2x4 between the subfloor and the beam running across the basement. Hope this works.
Also on the same header note...
I opened another passageway. This one is a 77". I used a sistered 2x10. This also sits on a single jack stand. This is on the sole plate on both sides.

Is the single jackstud enough for this span or should I use a double?
Thanks.

anything over 60" should have double jacks. as far as the original post, the blocking you did from the header below to the bottom of the sub-floor is crucial. do the same thing on the other opening regardless of whether it's on the sole plate or not. it this a 1-story or a 2?

sharp 12-15-2009 07:15 AM

It's a 2 story. The work was done on the first floor

Gary in WA 12-15-2009 01:08 PM

The table I gave is the bare minimum to use for safety, taken from the IRC. Please use the tables for the spans, notice they may be interpolated for your exact house span and number of floors. 1 floor supported, 36' span, requires 2 jacks for a 4'5" opening.
Supporting 2 floors, 36' span = 2'5" w. 2 jacks. 36' span = 4'11" and 3 jacks each side. Your 2-2x10's are not enough for the load above for minimum safety.

Be safe, Gary

sharp 12-15-2009 03:29 PM

How do you support 3 2x 12s with a double jack stud?
Won't the header then be coming out from the top and sole plates for flush sheet rock?

Gary in WA 12-15-2009 06:08 PM

You frame the wall wider OR go to a glu-lam, para-lam, LVL, etc. that is an engineered product that will carry the load and fit in your wall. Tell the lumber yard salesman your specs: eg- 7' span, 30' building span, joists above not continuous, interior wall. = 3-1/2" x 7-1/4" LVL with 4" minimum bearing at each end (3-2x4's each side).
Be safe, Gary

ClemS 12-15-2009 08:05 PM

i'd mind the big openings on a two story. anything over 5' wide being big. consult an engineer for proper load distribution. :thumbsup:

sharp 12-15-2009 08:34 PM

After reading this, I think I'm going to bring the span down to 60". With this I will use the 2 2x12 on the triple jacks.

Back to the other load bearing span. The 48". Now I guess to keep things even I will raise the header from the 2x10 to a 2x12. Is one jack enough for this, or would the double be better support. Aesthetically the single will look better when done. But don't want to give up structural integrity.


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