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-   -   Whats the going rate for a FULL cement truck? 6/2008 price? (http://www.diychatroom.com/f19/whats-going-rate-full-cement-truck-6-2008-price-21965/)

ehoez 06-07-2008 06:59 PM

Whats the going rate for a FULL cement truck? 6/2008 price?
 
Whats the going rate for a FULL cement truck? June 2008 price?

in your area?



i'm looking to make a 20x50' concrete patio in my backyard, and wanted to know whats the going rate these days with $4 gal fuel / and $5 gal disel.

I'll call around on monday and get my local rates too, and post them.

Thanks guys..

ps. is it 13 or 14yrds in a truck now a days?

concretemasonry 06-07-2008 09:49 PM

The price for a "cement" truck is about $100,000 to $150,000 EMPTY.

Add to that the cost of a driver at about $40.00 per hour (wages, social security and fringe). - In addition to fuel and mantenance.

A good national average for a truck was about 5000 yards per year, but now the national average is probably about 8000 yards per year. Fuel is obviously much higher now. Delivery is one of the highest cost components in ready-mix prices.

Your patio might take one load for a new truck and 2 loads for an old, smaller truck.

Just make sure you order the proper mix for your geographic area and finish it properly with the appropriate control joint spacing. Bad concrete or poorly placed concrete is much more expensive to tear out and replace than it is to place.

If you want the best concrete supplier, talk to the local people that pour concrete. Every area has one concrete supplier that is cheaper than others for good reasons (usually uniformity and service) and he is usually is the smallest supplier.

You can call around your loacal area for prices - that is the easest approach.

Termite 06-08-2008 02:39 AM

A full truck here is 11 yards.

I'd budget for $100/yard. That's a shot from the hip though.

nap 06-08-2008 10:21 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by concretemasonry (Post 128657)
The price for a "cement" truck is about $100,000 to $150,000 EMPTY.

but he asked for the price of a full one. Last I checked, that would add about $1100 to the price you suggested:wink:

Bud Cline 06-08-2008 04:19 PM

Is the reason the guy isn't getting a straight answer is because the contributors so far have no idea?:)

nap 06-08-2008 05:23 PM

he got an answer. Around here it is about $100/yard more or less depending on your status with the concrete company.

last I knew they were hauling 11 yards per load so that makes it $1100.

what else do you want?

prices are in a constant change so what is quoted today may not even be close tomorrow. He has the right idea about calling the supplier.

if you want to figure the slab at 4" and no footers, it would be about 12 1/2 yards. He will need 2 loads. The other problem is this is figuring the trucks that are used around my area. Some areas still use rear dump which do not carry as much. Also, do not know if there are any weight restrictions in OP's area so that may require the use of more smaller loads.

bottom line, nobody gave an exact answer because nobody here can. There are too many variables and not enough info and location specific knowledge.

so, since you wanted to attempt to belittle anybody that has offered any info, remember, you offered absolutely none yourself.

and honestly, concretemasonry did answer the actual question that was asked. To be honest though, I think he is a bit low on the price.

Bud Cline 06-08-2008 06:34 PM

Quote:

so, since you wanted to attempt to belittle anybody that has offered any info, remember, you offered absolutely none yourself.
Jesus Christ......I wasn't attempting to belittle anyone. I said what you said for God's sake. Seems you have a very short fuse for no good reason.

I quit pouring concrete over fifteen years ago and have no idea what it costs these days. In my area nine yards was the truck limit at that time and the cost was $55 per yard. The trucks could carry more but weight restrictions shortened up the loads. There is no way I could answer the guys question and the real answer must be sought locally.:)

So...Is the reason the guy isn't getting a straight answer is because the contributors so far have no idea?

I see now the answer to that is....YES.

nap 06-08-2008 08:24 PM

wrong, we all have an idea, just not the specifics. Even you have said exactly that which is a far cry from:

Quote:

Bud ClineIs the reason the guy isn't getting a straight answer is because the contributors so far have no idea?:)

Quote:

Jesus Christ......I wasn't attempting to belittle anyone. I said what you said for God's sake. Seems you have a very short fuse for no good reason.
btw: you can just call me Lord. Jesus Christ is ssooooo formal and I'm just not that kind of guy.

BigJimmy 06-08-2008 10:06 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by nap (Post 128825)
btw: you can just call me Lord. Jesus Christ is ssooooo formal and I'm just not that kind of guy.

Ok, that made me laugh so hard I have coffee coming out of my left nostril, thank you very much!:laughing:

phillipjohn 06-10-2008 11:47 AM

Hey I thought all concrete trucks were 10 yards!? it differs from state to state?here in fla there all 10 yds

jogr 06-10-2008 11:57 AM

9 yard truck from my local supplier at about $80 per yard. But yours will be different. Some places it's over $150 a yard. Depends on location mix, supplier etc.

Also don't call it cement, it's concrete that you want and you want the right mix. Id suggest you figure out how many yards you want and ask the local plant what mix they recomend for you project, whether it will come on one or two trucks and the cost. They will also need to know what kind of timing you want between the trucks. So figure out how long it will take you to place the first truck.

47_47 06-10-2008 01:17 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by jogr (Post 129249)
9 yard truck from my local supplier at about $80 per yard. But yours will be different. Some places it's over $150 a yard. Depends on location mix, supplier etc.

Id suggest you figure out how many yards you want and ask the local plant what mix they recomend for you project, whether it will come on one or two trucks and the cost. They will also need to know what kind of timing you want between the trucks. So figure out how long it will take you to place the first truck.

Also ask how much time you have to place the concrete before they start charging waiting time. Around here it is 10 minutes plus 3 minutes per yard.

concretemasonry 06-10-2008 02:16 PM

The last posts illustrate the factors affecting the cost of delivered concrete.

Once you are at the job, the only important item is time. You have a very expensive truck tied up delivering an relatively cheap, material, perishable (sand, rock, cement and water), so the meter keeps running. In the real world, it is about $2 per minute after the standard discharge time unless you have a stupid supplier. - Some suppliers load the excess into the initial per yard charge to cover all job site problems.

ehoez 06-10-2008 02:31 PM

LOL funny replies...

but i would like to thank everyone who replied..

including the guy who quoted me the price on buying a brand new truck too. lol

Thanks again..

you guys are right, i'm in the atlanta area i was quoted $99a yrd / 9yr truck max for residentals / + $6 fuel charge and +$3 EPA fee each truck..

concretemasonry 06-10-2008 04:13 PM

ehoez -

Since you are interested in the final detailed cost, check your quantities. Since you wanted a price per load, a good answer is difficult since few jobs are built "by the load". Concrete is a material that is very highly dependant on delivery time and cost (fuel, truck, labor).

Last time I checked, a 20x50 patio at 4" thick would take over 12 yards plus waste, which is two loads. Did you get intormation on the unloading time (wheeling to the back yard, etc.) and the short load charge? A delivery to a good site in a larger truck (if used) could be more economical.

I don't want to rain on your parade, but the unloading time and extra truck load could boost prices. If you are dealing with a supplier that has a very structed pricing policy or a very loose policy, you could be O.K. Only 12 yards is nothing to a company that may sell over 1,000,000 yards per year. Few sell less than 80,000 yards a year.

A contractor would not have a problem with the odd qualtity because of his recurring business and experience. A DIYer could run into the mistake of ordering a 9 yard load and then paying a minimums and extras for a second short load.- It you want to shop, look ahead and have your quantities calculated in advance because the "per truck and per hour charges" get very high when you do not fit into the "up to 9 yard maximum" pricing schedule.


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